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Full text of "The Heritage Lodge no. 730, A.F. & A.M., G.R.C. : proceedings 1982-1983"

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ftije heritage lobge $0,730 



INSTITUTED 
Sept. 21, 1977 

WORSHIPFUL MASTER 
W.Bro. G.E. Zwicker 
^99 O'Connel Road, 
Peterborough, Ont . , 
K9J 4E1 

Res. (705) 7*0-2113 
Bus. (705) 7^5-^803 




CONSTITUTED 

Sept. 23, 1978 

SEC 'Y 8c EDITOR 
R. W.Bro. J. Pos 
10 Mayfield Ave. , 
Guelph, Ont. , 
NIG 2L8 

Res. (519) 821-^995 
Bus. (519) 824-4120 



Vol.o, No.l 



Cambridge, Ontario, Canada 



lept. 1982 



Please Note: 



The opinions expressed by the authors, reviewers 
and other participants in the papers and discussions in- 
cluded in these Proceedings are not necessarily those of 
The Heritage Lodge. 



SUMMONS 

Dear Sirs and Brethren: 

By order of the Worshipful Master, W.Bro. George E. 
Zwicker, you are hereby summoned to attend the Twenty- 
Fifth Regular Meeting of The Heritage Lodge No. 730, G.R. 
C., to be held in the Preston-Hespeler Masonic Temple 
located at the North-East corner of the intersection of 
Highways 401 and 24 on:- 

WEDNESDAY EVENING, NOVEMBER 17th, 1982, at 7 : 30 p.m. 

prompt for the purpose of introducing and transacting such 
business as may be regularly brought before the Lodge. Two 
very important events will take place at this historic 
meeting. First, the Installation and Investiture Ceremon- 
ies will be conducted by M. W.Bro. N.R. Richards, Charter 
Member and the first I. P.M. of the Lodge, who will be the 
Installing Master and who will be assisted by a large 
number of prominent Masons from the jurisdiction. The 
Master Elect on this important occasion is R. W.Bro. Balfour 
LeGresley, and we shall be looking forward to a large 
attendance of Members and Visitors. 

Second, as this is also the occasion for our 
Official Inspection, the Lodge will be receiving R. W.Bro. 
Rev. W. Gray Rivers, D.D.G.M., Waterloo District, Charter 
Member and the first Chaplain of our Lodge and who has 
continued to serve that office with reverence and distin- 
ction to this year. 



Favourable reports having been received on the appli- 
cations for affiliation from the following Brethren, the 
Worshipful Master has declared that a Ballot will be taken 
at this meeting :- 

1. Ralph Martin Brubacher, P.D.D.G.M.; 62 Centre Street, 
Elmira; Age 57', Contractor; recommended by R.W.Bro. 
Gary Powell and R.W.Bro. Ed Drew. 

2. Wayne Earl Elgie, P.D.D.G.M.; ^9 Skyline Drive, Dundas ; 
Age 44; Supervisory Assistant; recommended by V.W.Bro. 
Laverne Dawdy and R.W.Bro, Balfour LeGresley. 

3. Durward I. Greenwood, P.D.D.G.M.; Box 189, Grand Valley; 
Age 56; Contractor; recommended by V.W.Bro. Ernest J. 
Brown and R.W.Bro. J. Pos. 

4. W. Earl Rawson, P.D.D.G.M.; Goderich; Age 63; Retired 
Merchant; recommended by V.W.Bro. Ernest J. Brown and 
R.W.Bro. J. Pos. 

5. Ford Nelson Rupert, P.G.R.; 71 Cedar St., Kapuskasing; 
Age 72; Retired School Principal; recommended by R.W. 
Bro. Ronald E. Groshaw and R.W.Bro. W.T. Greenhough. 

6. Victor Douglas Alyea, P.M.; R.R. #2, Hillier; Age 36; 
Elementary School Teacher; recommended by W.Bro. John 
M. Jinks and W.Bro. Allan Dempsey. 

7. Alfred J. Bendle, W.M.; 179 Olive Ave., Willowdale; 
Age 5&i Printer; recommended by R.W.Bro. M. Kinnee 
and W.Bro. John Boersma. 

8. Gordon Arnold Gross, W.M.; 379 Hinton Ave., Ottawa; 
Age 59 f Geologist; recommended by R.W.Bro. J. Pos and 
R.W. Bro . Wm . Lowe . 

9. Kenneth Grant Halbert, P.M.; 7015 Paisley Ave., Niagara 
Falls; Age 45; Clerk; recommended by R.W.Bro. Wm. Lowe 
and Bro. Malcolm McKissack. 

10. Leonard Harrison, P.M.; 248 Royal Orchard Blvd., 
Thornhill; Age 55 i recommended by R.W.Bro. Ed Drew 
and R.W.Bro. Frank Bruce. 

11. Arthur Saxton, P.M.; 29 Traymoor Ave., Kingston; Age 
72; recommended by W.Bro. Harold B. Sills and W.Bro. 
Donald R. Thornton. 

12. Ronald Bennett Stuart Brown, M.M. ; 6360 Ash Street, 
Niagara Falls; Age 52; recommended by R.W.Bro. Wm. 
Lowe and W.Bro. Walter Scott. 

13. Reginald G. Carter, M.M. ; 11A Hunness Road, Toronto; 
Age 51 » Supervisor; recommended by W.Bro. H.J. 
Armstrong and V.W.Bro. K.H. Clark. 

14. Bruce M. Grimbleby, M.M.; 58 Scarborough Heights Blvd., 
Scarborough; recommended by R.W.Bro. Ed Drew and 
W.Bro. Wm. J. Boston. 

15. Stephen Harvey Maizels, M.M. ; 4454 Bathurst Street, 
Downsview; Age 39. Development Consultant; recommended 
by R.W.Bro. Ed Drew and R.W.Bro. Ronald E. Groshaw. 



- 3 - 

16. Richard Charles Slee, M.M. ; 3 Dartmouth Cresc, 

Toronto; Age 28; Public Administrator; recommended by 
W.Bro. H.J. Armstrong and V.W.Bro. K.H. Clark. 

17- George E. Appleyard, M.M.; 321, W. 2nd Street, Hamilton; 
Age oO; Electrician; recommended by W.Bro. David S. 
Amis and V.W.Bro. Laverne Dawdy. 

18. Robert William Donald Wilson, M.M. ; P.O. Box 146, 
Massey; Age 45; recommended by W.Bro. Terrance J. 
Thorn and R. W.Bro. Walter E. Schaefer. (School Teacher) 

19- Edward Mowat Jaques, M.M.; 618 Main Street, Port Dover; 
Age 78; Pharmacist; recommended by R. W.Bro. Rev. Gray 
Rivers and R. W.Bro. Henry G. Edgar. 

20. Thomas Roy Davies, M.M.; 784 Gladstone Drive, Woodstock; 
Age 45; Teacher; recommended by W.Bro. Earl W. 
Gillespie and V.W.Bro. Gordon Wilker. 

21. Warren Otto Mulack, P.D.D.G.M.; 119 Hyland Drive, 
Sudbury; Age 68; recommended by W.Bro. G. Chambers and 
W.Bro. Terrance J. Thorn. 

22. William James Searson, P.M.; P.O. Box Ayr; Age 68; 
Gentleman; recommended by R. W.Bro. Rev. W. Gray Rivers 
and W.Bro. Donald B. Kaufman. 

23. Victor Govan, M.M.; 81 Tarbart Terrace, London; Age 58; 
Merchant; recommended by R. W.Bro. Ed Carson and R. W.Bro. 
Norman Camp. 

24. Norman Lacasse, M.M.; 604 Thede Drive, Box 1120, Port 
Elgin; Age 68; Retired; recommended by R. W.Bro. Roy 
Weatherdon and R. W.Bro. Balfour LeGresley. 

25. Frank Richardson, W.M. ; 437 Thede Drive, Box 987. Port 
Elgin; Age 35; Stationary Engineer; recommended by 

R. W.Bro. Roy Weatherdon and R. W.Bro. Ed Drew. 



GENERAL PURPOSE COMMITTEE 

Also, you are reminded by R. W.Bro. Balfour LeGresley, 
Chairman, General Purpose Committee, that the next meeting 
will be held in Preston-Hespeler Masonic Temple on:- 

WEDNESDAY EVENING, OCTOBER 20th, 1982, at 7 : 30 P-m. 

sharp for purpose of transacting and discussing the lodge 
business. All Lodge Officers and Chairmen of Standing and 
Appointed Committees are urgently requested and obligated 
to attend; all other members are especially welcome. 

PLEASE NOTE: To assist in expediting the business and in 
improving the efficiency of the deliberations, it is imper- 
itive that each Committee Chairman or his designate and any 
other mason presenting material for discussion should submit 
their reports in writing. 

Sincerely and fraternally, 
R. W.Bro. J. Pos, Lodge Sec'y 



- ,4 - 

TWENTY-FOURTH REGULAR MEETING 

The Twenty-Fourth Regular Meeting of The Heritage 
Lodge No. 730, G.R.C., was held in the Preston-Hespeler 
Masonic Temple Cambridge, Wednesday, September 15th, 1982, 
with 9 Officers, 31 other Members and 21 Visitors for a 
total of 61 Masons as per Lodge Register. 

OPEN THE LODGE 

The Lodge was opened in the First Degree at 7:40 
p.m. by the Worshipful Master, W.Bro. George E. Zwicker, 
who welcomed the Brethren and assured them that they 
would receive profit and pleasure this evening. He then 
called on V. W.Bro. Laverne Ferguson to act as Director 
of Ceremonies and to present our distinguished visitors. 

RECEIVING VISITORS 

At this time, V. W.Bro. Ferguson was admitted to 
present R. W.Bro. Rev. W. Gray Rivers, D.D.G.M. , Waterloo 
District and R. W.Bro. Henry G. Edgar, D.D.G.M., Hamilton 
A District, who were received with grand honours, and 
extended their best wishes to the Brethren. 

The Worshipful Master also acknowledged other Grand 
Lodge Officers and newly elected and appointed members 
of the Board of General Purposes. He also requested a 
list of names of all The Heritage Lodge Members who 
attained Grand Lodge Rank this year. 

CONFIRMING LODGE MINUTES 

It was regularly moved by R. W.Bro. Balfour LeGresley, 
seconded by V. W.Bro. Wilfred Greenhough, that the minutes 
of the Twenty-Third Regular Meeting of the Lodge held in 
the Peterborough Masonic Temple, 415 Rubidge Street, 
Peterborough, May 15, 1982, which were printed in the 
Lodge Proceedings, Vol. 5, No. 4, and distributed to all 
the members of the Lodge, be accepted as circulated. 
Motion carried. 

CORRESPONDENCE 

Letters were received as follows: 

1. From M. W.Bro. R.E. Davie s, Grand Secretary, dated 

May 19, 1982, bringing to our attention the numerous 
inclusions of the word (The) before the words 
'Heritage Lodge', when quoting from a letter received 
from the Grand Secretary as printed in our Lodge 
Proceedings, March, Vol. 5, No. 3, page 10. Your 
Secretary responded by letter of May 25th, apologizing 
for having inserted the word 'The* in brackets along 
with an explanation of our concern and enquired if 
the Grand Lodge Committee on Warrants might review 
the matter to everyone's satisfaction. 



2. From Glenson T. Jones, Lodge Archivist, dated May 
24, 1982, requesting a list of the literature papers, 
records, books and other documents which are, or 
should be, under the care of the lodge archivist. 

3. From W.Bro. Charles R. Griffiths, member of The 
Heritage Lodge, dated May 26, 1982, informing the 
Lodge that he has in his possession a Pictorial 
History of the Grand Chapter of Royal Arch Masons 
of Canada in the Province of Ontario. The History 
was published to celebrate the 75th Anniversary of 
the Grand Chapter at the Royal Connaught Hotel, 
Hamilton, February 24, 193 2. Broth Griffiths would 
be happy to donate it to our Lodge if we are inter- 
ested. 

4. From Ernest G. Cosh, Secretuary/Treasurer of the 
Preston-New Hope Masonic Holding Corporation, dated 
May 28, 1982, advising that the new hall rental 
officer will be Mr. John B. Midgley, 46 Fishermill 
Road, Cambridge, (519) 658-2146. 

5. From Amos J. Loveday Jr., Chief Curator, the Ohio 
Historial Society, dated June 25, 1982, responding 
to a request for information concerning the recon- 
struction of a historic lodge room at the Ohio 
Village; which is a site operated by The Ohio 
Historical Society. Mr. Loveday enclosed a reprint 
of an article in the Columbus Dispatch Magazine as 
well as cost information. He also informs us that 
the Grand Lodge of Ohio funded the project as well 
as a second lodge hall "New England #4" in Worthing- 
ton, Ohio, which was built around 1820, and operated 
by the Grand Lodge of Ohio as a historic building. 

6. From Robert F. Gordon, dated July 2, 1982, bringing 
to our attention that at our May Regular Meeting 

in Peterborough, R. W.Bro. John Auckland, Sovereign 
Master, Allied Masonic Degrees was admitted with a 
number of members of Capital City Council 154, as 
printined in our last Proceedings; however, there 
were only two members from 154 and the majority were 
members of Kawartha Council No. 143, Peterborough. 

7. From W.Bro. Gordon A. Durnford, dated July 6th, 
1982, requesting a demit from The Heritage Lodge. 

8. From R. W.Bro. Charles A Sankey, Charter Member of 
The Heritage Lodge, dated July 25, 198 2, giving 
references, as printed in the Grand Lodge Fraternal 
Reviews of reports on masonic restoration projects 

in three States of the United States of America. 
For anyone wishing to review the information, it 
is referenced as follows: 

NEW HAMPSHIRE - 

Their Proceedings of 1977 in our 1979 G.L. Proceedings 
" 1978 » - 1980 " 



- 6 - 

Their Proceedings of 1979 in our 1981 Fraternal Reviews 
" " 1981 " " 1982 

MONTANA - 

Their Proceedings of 1976 in our 1978 G.L. Proceedings 
« « " 1979 " "1981 w " 

" 1980 " " 1982 Fraternal Reviews 

OHIO - 



Their Proceedings of 1977 in our 1979 G.L. Proceedings 

9. From Mrs. J.V. Ellis, Archivist, Missisquoi 

Historical Society, Stanbridge East, Quebec, dated 
August 11, 1982, giving the inscription on the tomb 
stone of Sir John Johnson, along with a photo copy 
of a historical report giving the details and 
reasons for the relocation of the tomb stone. (This 
was a follow-up to my visit to their facilities this 
past August) . 

10. From G. Kennedy, Secretary/Treasurer, The Worshipful 
Masters', Past Masters 1 and Wardens' Association of 
Waterloo District, dated August 13, 1982, announcing 
the Fall Meeting to be held September 30th, 1982, in 
the Preston-New Hope Masonic Temple at 8:00 p.m. Also 
included was a copy of the Inter-Lodge Visitation 
Schedule. (The Heritage Lodge was not included in 
the schedule and no reasons given) . 

11. From H. Stewart Greavette, Charter Member, dated 
August 16, 1982, with comments on the hand carved 
officers chairs which are to be disposed as a result 
of building renovations. 

12. From the Office of the Grand Secretary, received 
during the second week in August, 1982, with an 
enclosure being a pictorial notice from Robert A 
Hinshaw, Grand Secretary, Grand Lodge of Ohio, 
announcing the Grand Reopening of The Grand Lodge 
of Ohio Museum on September 19, 1982, at 2:30 p.m. 
in Worthington. 

13. From R.W.Bro. Charles A Sankey, Charter Member, dated 
August 23, 1982, enclosing a copy of correspondence 
from Charles Lorimer, Grand Secretary of the Grand 
Lodge of British Columbia giving the names and 
addresses of three Lodges in British Columbia licensed 
as Lodges of Instruction, Education and Research, 
with emphasis on Education and Instruction. 

14. From R.W.Bro. Ernest Delvin, Secretary of Rennais- 
sance Lodge No. 119, Grand Lodge of Quebec, dated 
August 28, 1982, thanking us most sincerley for 
copies of our Lodge By Laws, Five Year Progress 
Report and the loan of my personal copy of the 
Historical Record of the formation of our Lodge. 



This was delivered 'in person' on a recent trip 
through Montreal. The Masons in the Province of 
Quebec are in the process of organizing a Research 
Lodge in the city of Montreal to be designated 
"Eureka No. 1". 

15. From R.W. Bro. Frank J. Bruce, Chairman of the 
Committee on Masonic Information, dated August 31, 
1982, enclosing copies of two reviews of V.W.Bro. 
Vogan's paper to be presented at our Regular Septem- 
ber Meeting. 

16. From A. J. Harriman, Secretary, Preston-New Hope 
Masonic Holding Corporation, received Sept. 8, 198 2, 
advising the Lodge that our rent payment for the 
year 1982-83 will amount to $383.00. Also included 
was a new list of Officers and Directors of the 
Corporation for 1982-83. 

17. From R.W. Bro. R.E. Hargraeves, Charter Member, dated 
September 11, 1982, enclosing payment for dues and 
requesting a demit. 

18. From W.Bro. Donald B. Kaufman, Charter Member, 
dated September 15, 1982, indicating a correction 
in the D.D.G.M.'s official trestle board which had 
listed the Installation Ceremony for Cambridge Lodge 
No. 728 as Oct. 22, 1982. The correct date for the 
Installation and Investiture Ceremonies for Cambridge 
Lodge No. 728, is October 29, 1982. Please note 
this correction, and plan to attend. 

MOTION RE: CORRESPONDENCE 

It was regularly moved by R.W. Bro. Ed Drew and 
seconded by V.W.Bro. Randall Langs, that the correspondence 
be received, processed and filed in accordance with 
Lodge practice. Motion carried. 

PASSING ACCOUNTS 

The following accounts amounting to $2,490.03, and 
covering the period since the last Regular Meeting, dated 
May 15, 1982, to September 15, 1982, were presented: 

Secretary's Account: 

Postage, May Proceedings $200.03 

Honorarium, 6 months 175. 00 $ 375.03 

Mrs. Karen Perry, Fergus: 

Typing, May Proceedings and 

Summons 45.00 

Instant Print, Guelph: 

Printing, 550 copies May Summons 22.86 



- 8 - 

House of Print, Guelph: 

Printing, 550 copies @ 32 pg., 

May Proceedings $ 353.00 

Guelph Printing Services, Guelph: 

2000 Manila envelopes and printing 152.66 

Waterloo Masonic District Association, 
Cambridge: 
Annual Lodge dues 12.00 

Grand Lodge, Hamilton: 

Semi-annual returns $500.75 

To commute Life Memberships 200.00 700.75 

Senior Steward's Account: 

Refreshments, Sept. Mtg. 1982 11.73 

TOTAL $2,490.03 

MOTION RE: ACCOUNTS 

It was regularly moved by R.W.Bro. Edsel Steen, 
seconded by W.Bro. Frank Dunn, that the accounts be paid. 
Motion carried. 

RECEIVING PETITIONS 

Applications for membership by Affiliation were 
received from the following: 

1. BRUBACHER, Ralph Martin, P.D.D.G.M., 62 Centre St., 
Elmira, Ontario; Age 57; Contractor; member of Glen- 
rose Lodge No. 628, G.R.C.; recommended by R.W.Bro. 
Gary Powell and R.W.Bro. Ed Drew. 

2. ELGIE, Wayne Earl, P.D.D.G.M.; 49 Skyline Dr., 
Dundas, Ontario; Age 44; Supervisory Assistant; 
member of Ancient Landmarks Lodge No. 654, G.R.C.; 
recommended by V. W.Bro. Laverne Dawdy and R.W.Bro. 
Balfour LeGresley. 

3. GREENWOOD, Durward I., P.D.D.G.M.; Box 189, Grand 
Valley, Ontario; Age 56; Contractor; member of 
Scott Lodge No. 421, G.R.C.; recommended by V. W.Bro. 
Ernest J. Brown and R.W.Bro. Jack Pos. 

4. RAWSON, W. Earl, P.D.D.G.M.; Goderich, Ontario; Age 
63; Retired Merchant; member of Maitland Lodge No. 
33, G.R.C.; recommended by V. W.Bro. Ernest J. Brown 
and R.W.Bro. Jack Pos. 

5. RUPERT, Ford Nelson, P.G.R.; 71 Cedar St., Kapuska- 
sing, Ont.; Age 72; Retired School Principal; member 
of Spruce Falls Lodge No. 648, G.R.C.; recommended 

by R.W.Bro. R.E. Groshaw and R.W.Bro. W.T. Greenhough 



- 9 - 

6. ALYEA, Victor Douglas, P.M.; R.R. #2, Hillier, 
Ontario; Age 36; Elementary School Teacher; member 
of Consecon Lodge No. 50, G.R.C.; recommended by 
W.Bro. John M. Jinks and W.Bro. W. Allan Dempsey. 

7. BENDLE, Alfred J., W.M. ; 179 Olive Ave., Willowdale, 
Ontario; Age 56; Printer; member of Vaughan Lodge 
No. 54, G.R.C.; recommended by R. W.Bro. M. Kinnee 
and W.Bro. John Boersma. 

8. GROSS, Gordon Arnold, W.M. ; 379 Hinton Ave., Ottawa, 
Ontario; Age 59; Geologist; member of The Builders 
Lodge No. 177, G.R.C.; recommended by V. W.Bro. Jack 
Pos and R. W.Bro. Wm. Lowe. 

9. HALBERT, Kenneth Grant, P.M.; 7015 Paisley Ave., 
Niagara Falls, Ont. ; Age 45; Clerk; member of Myrtle 
Lodge No. 337, G.R.C.; recommended by R. W.Bro. Wm. 
Lowe and Bro. Malcolm McKissack. 

10. HARRISON, Leonard, P.M.; 248 Royal Orchard Blvd., 
Thornhill, Ontario; Age 55; T.T.C. Operator; member 
of Doric Lodge No. 316, G.R.C.; recommended by R.W. 
Bro. Ed Drew and R.W. Bro. Frank Bruce. 

11. SAXTON, Arthur, P.M.; 29 Traymoor Ave., Kingston, 
Ontario; Age 72; Retired; member of Minden Lodge 
No. 253, G.R.C.; recommended by W.Bro. Harold B. 
Sills and W.Bro. Donald R. Thornton. 

12. BROWN, Ronald Bennett Stuart, M.M. ; 6360 Ash Street, 
Niagara Falls, Ont.; Age 52; Stationary Engineer; 
member of Adoniram Lodge No. 573, G.R.C.; recommended 
by R.W. Bro. Wm. Lowe and W.Bro. Walter Scott. 

13. CARTER, Reginald G. , M.M.; 11A Hunness Road, Toronto, 
Ontario; Age 51; Supervisor; member of The Anthony 
Sayer Lodge No. 640, G.R.C.; recommended by W.Bro. 
H.J. Armstrong and V. W.Bro. K.H. Clark. 

14. GRIMBLEBY, Bruce M. , M.M. ; 58 Scarborough Heights 
Blvd., Scarborough, Ontario; Age 36; Assistant 
Manager; member of John Ross Robertson Lodge No. 545, 
G.R.C.; recommended by R.W. Bro. Ed Drew and W.Bro. 
Wm. J. Boston. 

15. MAIZELS, Stephen Harvey, M.M. ; 4454 Bathurst Street, 
Downsview, Ontario; Age 39; Development Consultant; 
member of Palestine Lodge No. 559, G.R.C.; recommended 
by R.W. Bro. Ed Drew and R.W. Bro. Ronald E. Groshaw. 

16. SLEE, Richard Charles, M.M. ; 3 Dartmouth Crescent, 
Toronto, Ont.; Age 28; Public Administrator; member 
of The Anthony Sayer Lodge No. 640, G.R.C.; recom- 
mended by W.Bro. H.J. Armstrong and V. W.Bro. Kenneth 
H. Clark. 



- 10 - 

17. APPLEYARD, George E. , M.M. ; 321, W. 2nd Street, 
Hamilton, Ontario; Age 60; Electrician; member of 
The Barton Lodge No. 6, G.R.C.; recommended by W. 
Bro. David S. Amis and V.W.Bro. Laverne Dawdy. 

18. WILSON, Robert William Donald, M.M. ; 0.0. Box 146, 
Massey, Ontario; Age 45; School Teacher; member of 
Espanola Lodge No. 527, G.R.C.; recommended by W. 
Bro. Terrance J. Thorn and R.W.Bro. Walter E. 
Schaefer. 

19. JAQUES, Edward Mowat, M.M. ; 618 Main Street, Port 
Dover, Ont. ; Age 78; Pharmacist; member of Erie 
Lodge No. 149, G.R.C.; recommended by R.W.Bro. Gray 
Rivers and R.W.Bro. Henry G. Edgar. 

20. DAVIES, Thomas Roy, M.M. ; 784 Gladstone Drive, 
Woodstock, Ontario; Age 45; Teacher; member of King 
Solomon Lodge No. 43, G.R.C.; recommended by W. Bro. 
Earl W. Gillespie and V.W.Bro. Gordon Wilker. 

21. MULACK, Warren Otto, P.D.D.G.M.; 119 Hyland Drive, 
Sudbury, Ontario; Age 68; member of Espanola Lodge 
No. 527, G.R.C.; recommended by W.Bro. G. Chambers 
and W. Bro. Terrance Thorn. 

22. SEARSON, William James, P.M.; P.O. Box Ayr, Ontario; 
Age 68; Gentleman; member of Ayr Lodge No. 172, G.R.C 
recommended by R.W.Bro. Gray Rivers and W.Bro. Donald 
B. Kaufman. 

23. GOVAN, Victor, M.M. ; 81 Tarbart Terrace, London, 
Ont.; Age 58; Merchant; member of Corinthian Lodge 
No. 330, G.R.C; recommended by R.W.Bro. Ed Carson 
and R.W.Bro. Norman Camp. 

24. LACASSE, Norman, M.M. ; 604 Thede Drive, Box 1120, 
Port Elgin, Ont.; Age 68; Retired; member of St. 
Lawrence Lodge No. 131, G.R.C; recommended by R.W. 
Bro. Roy Weatherdon and R.W.Bro. Balfour LeGresely. 

25. RICHARDSON, Frank, W.M. ; 437 Thede Drive, Box 987, 
Port Elgin, Ont.; Age 35; Stationary Engineer; member 
of Port Elgin Lodge No. 429, G.R.C; recommended by 
R.W.Bro. Roy Weatherdon and R.W.Bro. Ed Drew. 

An application for subscription to the Lodge Proceed- 
ings was also received from: William H. Stemper , M.M. ; 
593 Park Avenue, New York City, New York; Age 35; Priest/ 
Administrator; member of Kane Lodge, No. 454, Grand Lodge 
of Ohio. 

MOTION RE: PETITIONS 

It was regularly moved by R.W.Bro. Ed Drew, seconded 
by V.W.Bro. Randall Langs, that the Applications be 
received and processed in accordance with Lodge practice. 
Motion carried. 



- 11 - 

READING NAMES OF BRETHREN IN ARREARS OF DUES 

The Secretary reported twelve members in arrears for 
1981-82 and five for 1980-81-82. The Brethren were 
reminded of the serious consequences of being suspended 
for non-payment of dues. Even though this lodge is a 
Historical/Research Lodge, nontheless it is Constituted 
as a Regular Lodge and suspension from The Heritage Lodge 
automatically results in suspension in all lodges (Section 
210, Constitution of the Grand Lodge), and the member 
so suspended is deprived of all his Masonic rights and 
privileges (Section 207) . 

The Worshipful Master instructed the Secretary to 
send the customary notification and consequences to the 
five members more than 12 months in arrears and strong 
statements to the remainder. 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES 

1. COMMITTEE OF GENERAL PURPOSES - R.W. Bro. Balfour 
LeGresley, Chairman, reported on the Meeting of the 
Committee held on August 25, 1982, with 13 members present, 

REPORTS 

MEMBERSHIP - R.W.Bro. Ed Ralph, Chairman; indicated that 
during the fund raising campaign for the H.O.M.E. project, 
less emphasis would be placed on recruitment. However, we 
should continue to periodically mention, in the Lodge 
Proceedings the work of other organizations and research 
lodges such as Quatuor Coronati, Masonic Museums and the 
Philalethes Society. 

MASONIC INFORMATION - R.W.Bro. Frank Bruce, Chairman; 
the September program is in place. There is no paper 
for the November Meeting when the Installation and 
Investiture Ceremonies are held and this is also the 
Official visit of the D.D.G.M. M.W.Bro. Eric Nancekivell 
will present a paper for the March, 1983 meeting. Plans 
are underway for a lecture on Freemasonry in Toronto Area 
and possibly 4 mini papers for a meeting in the spring 
or fall of 1983. The question of Lodge visitations was 
also discussed, and it was suggested that Lodges be 
encouraged to make use of the H.O.M.E. Project represen- 
tatives in their Districts. Also papers already presented 
in The Heritage Lodge may be read in other Lodges if they 
wish. 

MASONIC MUSEUM - R.W.Bro. J. Pos, Chairman. With the 
major emphasis on the Lodge Room Restoration Project, the 
Chairman clarified the objectives and indicated that three 
separate task force groups had been appointed their respec- 
tive reports are as follows: 



- 12 - 

The Masonic Heritage Corporation - W.Bro. Ron Cooper 
advised that the H.O.M.E. project now had legal status 
under the newly incorporated body titled "The Masonic 
Heritage Corporation" which will allow us to enter into 
legal contract with the Metropolitan Toronto and Region 
Conservation Authority. The Lodge Secretary was instructed 
to proceed in obtaining a corporate seal. The Organiza- 
tional By-Laws still have to be prepared. The M.T.R.C.A. 
lawyers on behalf of the Black Creek Pioneer Village are 
currently reviewing the proposed agreement. It is 
recommended that Membership in the Corporation come from 
The Heritage Lodge membership by election to a Board of 
Directors. The Directors will choose their own President 
and Executive Officers. Consistency will be maintained 
between the Corporate By-Laws and the Lodge By-Laws. 

The H.O.M.E. Project - R. W.Bro. Ed Drew and his Task 
Force have met 11 times. Forty-three District representa- 
tives have been appointed (see page kQ of these proceedings) 
and each issued with a kit of materials with complete 
instructions. Letters have been sent to all D.D.G.M.'s, 
Lodge Secretaries and District Representatives. Fund 
raising will 30on be underway now that the new masonic 
year has commenced. 

Expediting - W.Bro. Alan Hogg outlined their main task as 
lodge room furnishings, providing guides and organizing 
use of the lodge room. The building will be moved this 
fall, but the layout of the building has not yet been 
presented, nor have plans been initiated for the corner 
stone laying ceremony. 

CENTRAL DATA BANK - W.Bro. James Major emphasized the 
need to develop a consciousness about preservation of 
masonic artifacts. Special projects could include: 
microfilming, picture record, and cataloguing 100 year 
or more histories. 

PUBLICATIONS - A draft copy of the revised "Invitational 
Pamphlet" was circulated for comment. Members were 
requested to send their comments to the Publications 
Committee or the Lodge Secretary. 

No reports were received from Library, Reception, 
Historian or Freemason Editor. 

A number of items were discussed under correspondence 
and general business: The Lodge By-Laws may be finalized 
by the November Regular Meeting. Year-end Committee 
Reports are not being submitted. R. W.Bro. Frank Bruce 
and M. W.Bro. Wm. K. Bailey will propose a suitable Five 
Year Heritage Recognition Award and Criteria for next 
meeting. A Special Committee is to be appointed to look 
into publishing the 116 Canadian Masonic Research Associa- 
tion booklets into a single volume. Planning is still in 
progress for the Masonic Music Program and ritual music 
recording. A one or two man committee to resolve the 






- 13 - 

"gavel mystery" is to be appointed to liaison with the 
Lodge Secretary. The Public Museum Search will end this 
fall and R.W.Bro. Ed Ralph will submit a final report 
in January, 1983. The high cost of printing and mailing 
Lodge Proceedings and Summonses is to be reviwed. 

TREASURER'S REPORT - R.W.Bro. Gary Powell presented a 
summary of the 'Cost of Operation' for each year since 
1976 and a projected budget for 1982-83. If current 
costs continue to increase, it may be necessary to 
increase the annual lodge dues. 

NEW OFFICES - Because of heavy loads and new responsibil- 
ities, new officers will have to be appointed for the 
following offices: Historian, Chaplain, Librarian, 
Assistant Secretary, Junior Steward and Tyler. Prepara- 
tion and selection of officers was discussed but no 
recommendations resulted. 

RECIPROCAL COMMUNICATIONS - Exchange of information and 
published material with other Historical/Research Lodges 
through the Grand Secretary's Office initially was 
approved in principle. 

NEXT MEETING - To be held in the Hespeler-Preston Masonic 
Temple, October 20, 1982, at 7:30 p.m. 

2. H.O.M.E. PROJECT - R.W.Bro. Ed Drew, Chairman, pre- 
sented a supplementary update of the fund raising committee 
whose membership includes Ed Ralph (V. Chairman) , Gord 
Brittain (Secretary) , James Major (Treasurer) , Alan Hogg, 
Paul Curry and Bert Wiggins. M.W.Bro. Howard 0. Polk, 
Grand Master, is the Honorary Chairman of the Project. 
The H.O.M.E. logo, which graphically illustrates the 
purpose, was designed by Alan Hogg. Printing for the 
Project is being done by the M.T.R.C.A.; this includes: 
letterheads, envelopes, acknowledgement cards, information 
brochures and large posters. 

The Official start for the campaign was held during 
the 127th Grand Lodge Communication in Toronto. A luncheon 
business meeting was held in the Ballroom of the Royal York 
Hotel, where more than 250 Masons were given an outline of 
the project. Campaign kits were supplied to each District 
Representative, with instructions from Paul Curry and 
James Major. A short costumed sketch was presented to the 
audience by Bert Wiggins assisted by Neil Helm, Peter 
Taylor, George Hinchcliff, John Silvera and Charles 
Jennings. 

The Deputy Grand Master, R.W.Bro. Ronald E. Groshaw 
(one of the originators of the Project) , spoke enthusiast- 
ically about the overall endeavour. Following the luncheon, 
an audio slide program was presented by Jack Pos. The 
slide show, prepared by Bro. Pos, has been duplicated and 
8 copies (available to the District Representatives) have 
been placed at strategic locations in the jurisdiction. 



- 14 - 

In concluding, R.W.Bro. Drew stated that mailings 
have been sent to all D.D.G.M.'s and to all Lodge 
Secretaries enlisting their support in this major 
endeavour . 

MOTION RE: COMMITTEE REPORTS 

The Report of the General Purpose Committee was 
accepted for adoption on a motion by R.W.Bro. LeGresley 
and R.W.Bro. Drew. 

GENERAL BUSINESS 

The Worshipful Master extended apologies from R.W. 
Bro. Robert Throop and R.W.Bro. Charles F. Grimwood. 

Life Membership Certificates for the following 
members are available from the Secretary: R.W.Bros. 
Wm. Pellow and Henry G. Edgar; V.W.Bros. Alfred Harrington 
and Albert Lee; and W.Bros. James Napier, Robert J.L. 
Butler, Glenson T. Jones and Aage Bjerkness. 

The following Brethren have yet to pick up their 
bound copies of the first five years of Lodge Proceedings. 
We are very fortunate in obtaining a very professional 
product of excellent quality. The cost is $25.00. If 
the books are not obtained by the Regular Meeting on 
November 17th, they will be sold to others who are anxious 
to obtain a personal copy. Those outstanding are as 
follows: Wm. Bocatynec, W.Bolton, G.D. Cameron, A.J. 
Cohoe, W. Alan Dempsey, R.F. Gordon, D. Grinton, R.R. 
Harrison, Alan Hogg, W.E. McLeod and R.J. Varley. Pick 
up your copy from the Secretary. 

The Secretary has requested that any member who is 
asked to speak at lodge meetings, especially in connection 
with the H.O.M.E. Project, should give the particulars: 
TOPIC, PERSON, PLACE, DATE, OCCASION AND HOST LODGE OR 
DISTRICT to the Secretary so that recognition and acknow- 
ledgement may be included in the Lodge Proceedings. 

MOTION RE: CORPORATE SEAL 

It was regularly moved by R.W.Bro. Ed Drew, seconded 
by R.W.Bro. David Bradley that the design for The Masonic 
Heritage Corporation, as submitted by R.W.Bro. Jack Pos 
and reproduced on the back of the agenda sheet of which 
every member had a copy be accepted and the Secretary 
instructed to proceed with the purchase of the Corporate 
Seal. Motion carried. 

Following some discussion on methods of reducing the 
printing cost of the Lodge Proceedings, the Secretary was 
instructed by the Worshipful Master on behalf of the Lodge 
to use his own discretion. 



- 15 - 



ELECTION 



At this time the Worshipful Master called on R.W. 
Bro. Warren Mulack, W.Bro. Frank Richardson and Bro. 
Norman Lacasse to act as Scrutineers and to report on 
the results of the election. 

The Worshipful Master then requested that all Lodge 
Members stand for the official count and to receive the 
election ballots. 

While the ballots were being counted, R.W. Bro. Gray 
Rivers outlined some difficulties he had encountered in 
getting the 20 required passengers for the group rate in 
connection with the Specail Flight to the Canary Islands 
and London, England, where our own R.W. Bro. Wallace E. 
McLeod is to be Installed on November 11, 198 2, as Worship- 
ful Master of Quatuor Coronati Lodge No. 2076. Anyone 
who is interested in attending this historic occasion is 
urgently requested to get in touch with R.W. Bro. Rivers, 
8 Kirby Ave., Dundas, Ontario. 

REPORT OF THE SCRUTINEERS 

Following the report of the Scrutineers, W.Bro. 
George E. Zwicker, Worshipful Master declared: 

R.W. Bro. Balfour LeGresley, Worshipful Master - Elect 

R.W. Bro. David C. Bradley, Senior Warden - Elect 

R.W. Bro. C. Edwin Drew, Junior Warden - Elect 

R.W. Bro. Jack Pos, Secretary - Elect 

R.W. Bro. Gary J. Powell, Treasurer - Elect 

for the ensuing twleve months. 

The Worshipful Master then ordered the ballots 
destroyed and thanked the Scruitineers for their assistance 
which was supported by the applause of the Brethren present, 

NOMINATIONS 

The positions of Tyler and Auditors were filled by 
acclimation as follows: 

Tyler - R.W. Bro. Greenhough nominated by R.W.Bros. 

Ed Drew and Edsel Steen 
Auditors - W.Bro. Norman E. Taylor and R.W. Bro. 

Kenneth G. Bartlett nominated by V. W.Bro. 

L. Ferguson and R.W. Bro. Gary Powell. 

There being no further nominations, the Worshipful 
Master declared the above duly elected. 

BALLOT 

Following a favourable collective ballot, the Worship- 
ful Master declared the following Brethren eligible for 



- 16 - 

membership in The Heritage Lodge No. 730, G.R.C., by 
affiliation and requested that each new member affix his 
signature to the Lodge Register at their earliest 
opportunity in token of submission to the Lodge By-Laws: 
R.W.Bros; Paul Alfred Curry and George F.W.' Inrig; V.W. 
Bro. Norman H. Bell; W.Bros.: Arthur Glenn Lewis 
Blanchard, Robert G. Chappell, Elmer Reeve Davies and 
Norman James Souter; and Bros.: John W.D. Broughton, 
Eric Howard Lakien, Heinrich Robert Schaefer, Roger 
Bruce Stroud and Herbert Bruce Tink. 

PAPER PRESENTATION 

The Worshipful Master called on R.W.Bro. Frank Bruce 
to proceed with the main feature of the evening. Follow- 
ing a brief review of the normal procedure for paper 
presentations and an appeal for authors of papers, R.W. 
Bro. Bruce introduced our Guest Speaker, V.W. Bro. G.H. 
Vogan. Brother Vogan was born on a farm in Huron County 
in 1904. Appointed Vice Principal of an Elementary 
School in St. Thomas in 1926, and was appointed Supervisor 
of Education in the St. Thomas District in 1963. He 
resigned as Chairman of the Municipal School Board in 1978 
His masonic career began in 1934, when he was Initiated 
into St. Thomas Lodge No. 44. He was Installed as 
Worshipful Master of his mother lodge in 1943; became a 
member of Moore Sovereign Consistry in 1948 when he 
received his 32°. He was appointed Grand Director of 
Ceremonies in 1951 and in 1952 was appointed Grand 
Representative of the Grand Lodge of Panama near the Grand 
Lodge of Canada in the Province of Ontario. 



HISTORY OF MASONRY IN ST. THOMAS 

(1818 - 1981) 

by 

V. W. Bro. G. H. Vogan 

When V.W. Bro. Ferguson approached me concerning the 
preparation of a paper on "Masonry in the St. Thomas Area" 
to be presented to Heritage Lodge, I rather reluctantly 
acceded to his request. After all, who could deny any 
request by "Fergie"? 

I started out by attempting an historical synopsis of 
Masonry in the whole district. I soon encountered problems 
when researching accurate information from the records. 
Some of the lodge records were incomplete and others were 
unavailable. I then decided to confine my report to "The 
History of Masonry in St. Thomas" where I found all of 
the records complete and available. 



- 17 - 

I realize that this will, of necessity, be somewhat 
more restrictive and, undoubtedly, have a preponderance 
of local flavor; but I am sure it contains a number of 
items which should be of historical interest to Masons 
across the Province. 

The oldest lodge in the St. Thomas District happens 
to be my mother lodge, St. Thomas No. 44, known throughout 
the district as "Old 44". While it cannot begin to compare 
in antiquity with such lodges as Niagara No. 2 or Ancient 
St. John's No. 3 at Kingston, it nevertheless ranks among 
the older lodges in the Province, having been constituted 
two years prior to the Grand Lodge of Canada in the Province 
of Ontario. 

However, 44 's predecessor lodge in St. Thomas dates 
back some thirty-five years previous to that. Shortly 
after Colonel Thomas Talbot arrived back in Upper Canada 
from Ireland in 1803, for the purpose of establishing a 
settlement on the north shore of Lake Erie, he acquired 
the services of a government land surveyor by the name of 
Mahlon Burwell. Burwell was a Colonel in the Militia 
and both he and Colonel Talbot served under General Brock 
in the war of 1812. Burwell' s family, originally from 
New Jersey, had settled in the Niagara District and Mahlon 
had joined Bertie Lodge #9 at Fort Erie. 

When conditions had quieted down somewhat after the 
war, Burwell decided to attempt to establish a Lodge in 
St. Thomas. In October 1817, he, along with several 
other brethren from the St. Thomas area, applied to the 
Grand Lodge of Niagara for a charter. Now we go back 
another twenty- five years to the year 1792. 

In that year, the British Fraternal Society of the 
Royal York Craft, A.F. & A.M. , in London, issued a 
Decree appointing William Jarvis, Secretary of the 
Province of Upper Canada, as Provincial Grand Master. 
(At that time there were two incompatible Grand Lodges 
operating in England: the "Moderns" and the "Ancients". 
The British Fraternal Society was the headquarters of the 
"Ancients". ) 

Jarvis evidently was moreinterested and concerned 
with the affairs of State than with the affairs of 
Masonry. There may have been two very good reasons for 
that. First, he had just recently been sent out from 
England to assume the office of Secretary of the newly- 
created Province of Upper Canada. (This, no doubt, 
carried with it a fairly heavy responsibility.) 
Secondly, he had been initiated in a Lodge in England only 
one month before receiving his appointment as Grand 
Master. So, in all probability, he did not realize the 
importance of significance of the position. 



- 18 - 

For whatever reason, he evidently took no action for 
three years. Then, in 1795, he began to issue warrants 
for Lodges in the area. According to the book "Whence 
Come We?", this was contrary to his Mandate. The book 
states that his mandate authorized him to issue dispensa- 
tions only. I have had an opportunity to see a copy of 
the original document by which Jarvis was appointed 
Provincial Grand Master. I examined it very carefully 
and perused it thoroughly. It very definitely states: 
"with the authority to issue warrants and dispensations 
for lodges to worthy Brethren in the Province". 

Two years laters, in 1797, when the seat of government 
was moved from Niagara-on-the-Lake to York, Jarvis moved 
his office to York and took his Masonic Warrant with him. 

The brethren in the Niagara District carried on the 
work of Grand Lodge, processing applications and petitions 
for charters. They even prepared warrants for Lodges 
which were sent to Jarvis at York for his signature. 
He evidently procrastinated to such an extent that in the 
year 1802 the Brethren in the Niagara District became 
so frustrated that they declared their independence and 
elected Bro. George Forsyth as Provincial Grand Master. 
Thus emerged the Schismatic Grand Lodge of Niagara. 
(The details of this split may be found in the book "Whence 
Come We?") 

I assume that most, if not all, of the brethren of 
Heritage Lodge will have read this book, so I purposely 
refrained from using excerpts from it to avoid unneces- 
sary repetition. However, I did use it as a source of 
reference for several items later on. 

It was to this Schismatic Grand Lodge at Niagara 
that Burwell and his St. Thomas Brethren sent a peitition 
for a charter in the fall of 1817. In the spring of 1818 
a charter was issued, under the seal of the Grand Lodge 
of Niagara and signed by the Provincial Grand Master, M. 
W.Bro. Robert Kerr, for a Lodge in St. Thomas denominated 
St. Thomas Lodge #30. The charter contained the names of 
nine Worthy Brethren, three of whom were assigned to the 
three Principal Offices of the Lodge: 

Mahlon Burwell: W.M. 
Gilman Willson: S.W. 
Joseph D. Fields: J.W. 

There is a slight discrepancy in the report of this 
Lodge in the book "Whence Come We?". The book states 
that the Lodge was first noted on August 12, 1818, and 
not mentioned after 1821." The facts are: the charter 
is dated March 20, 1818; the first meeting was held 
November 5, 1818, and the last meeting on July 6, 1822. 
What did happen on August 12, 1818 was than Daniel Rapelje, 
the first citizen of St. Thomas, sold a parcel of land 
to the officers of St. Thomas Lodge #30 and their succes- 



- 19 - 

sors, for the sum of seven pounds, ten shillings. (A 
copy of this deed is preserved in the archives of our 
Lodge.) There is no record of any Lodge rooms having 
been built on this lot. 

Between November 5, 1818 and July 6, 1822, thirteen 
meetings of this Lodge were held. It is interesting to 
note that the initiation fee was ten shillings for the 
First Degree, and fifteen shillings for each of the Second 
and Third Degrees. 

This was the last Charter issued by the Schismatic 
Grand Lodge at Niagara and - it is still in existence. 
In fact, it is the only original charter of any of the 
St. Thomas Lodges which still does exist. All the others 
were lost when a disastrous fire destroyed the Masonic 
Temple in January 1951. 

This Charter is in the possession of Mr. Donald 
Anderson, owner of Anderson's Department Store in St. 
Thomas. He told me that it was given to him for safe- 
keeping by his maternal grandfather, who was a grandson 
of one of the members of St. Thomas Lodge #30 when it 
disbanded in 1822. His name was Dr. Elijah Duncombe. He 
was a brother to Dr. Charles Duncombe, both of whom had 
a medical practice in St. Thomas in the early part of 
the nineteenth century. During that period Dr. Charles 
Duncombe was active in Masonry in the London area. He 
was the first Worshipful Master of Mount Moriah Lodge #20 
in Westminster in the year 1820. 

When an attempt was made in London in 1836 to 
reorganize a Provincial Grand Lodge, Dr. Charles Duncombe 
was elected Provincial Grand Master. However, there is 
no record of him having been installed because the follow- 
ing year he became deeply involved in the McKenzie Rebel- 
lion of 1837. He was forced to flee the country in 
disguise, under the cover of darkness. Although he 
lived to the age of 75, he never again returned to Canada. 

In 1904 to 1905, the late V.W.Bro. Dr. George Kennedy 
had the foresight to take steps to preserve the minutes 
of the meetings of this early Lodge. Unfortunately, the 
minutes of only four of the thirteen meetings were 
sufficiently legible to be preserved in their entirety. 
But he was able to save parts of the minutes of the other 
nine meetings. He pasted them in a scrapbook and sealed 
them with transparent plastic. They are still quite 
legible. I would like to refer to the minutes of two of 
these meetings: 

(1) On July 29, 1819, the Lodge initiated its first 
candidate: Bro. George Lee. 

(2) On July 6, 18 22, an emergent meeting was called. 
I quote from the minutes of that meeting : 

"St. Thomas Lodge of Friendship met at the Lodge 
Room at Br. Joseph Smith's on Saturday, July 6, 



- 20 - 

1822 and opened in the third degree, it being a 
Lodge of Emergency, to inquire into the unmasonic 
conduct of Br. Geo. Lee". It is noted that only 
two of the regular officers were in their chairs 
... It was moved and carried unanimously that 
Br. Geo. Lee ... be expelled from this Lodge 
for unmasonic conduct, that is to say, in the 
first place his leaving Brs. Joseph Smith and 
Horace Foster in bonds for his appearance to 
court on a Charge of Murder second, his defrauding 
Br. H.D. Lee in a certain Bond for a Deed of 
Land and furthermore his carrying away a sum of 
money belonging to the Lodge and leaving . . . 
other Brs. in the Lurch." 

This must have been a terrible shock to the Brethren 
of the Lodge - to have their very first candidate, who 
had been initiated only three years previously, turn out 
to be such a scoundrel. It was a fatal blow to Masonry 
in the community. As a result, Lodge activities were 
forthwith suspended and were not revived again in St. 
Thomas until thirty-one years later. 

On March 30, 1853, the Grand Lodge of Ireland issued 
a Warrant for a Lodge denominated St. Thomas Lodge No. 
232 G.I.R. The Warrant is duly signed by Most Wor. Bro. 
The Duke of Leinster, Grand Master of Ireland, and Bro. 
Fowler, Deputy Grand Secretary. The first recorded meet- 
ing of this Lodge was held on June 24, 1853. Officers 
of St. John's Lodge No. 209 in Londong (constitututed 
in 1841) and Middlesex Lodge No. 211 in Port Stanley 
(constituted in 1851) , both under Charters of the Grand 
Lodge of Ireland, and the officers of St. George's Lodge 
895 on the English Register, assisted at the installation 
of its ("232"s) officers. 

Two years later, in October 18 55, when the founding 
convention was held in Hamilton, St. Thomas Lodge sent 
representatives armed with a resolution from the Lodge 
supporting, in principle, the idea of forming a Grand 
Lodge of Canada. As you no doubt are aware, on that 
occasion only thirty Lodges agreed to unite to form the 
Grand Lodge of Canada. Of the thirty founding Lodges, 
eleven were operating under an Irish Charter and St. Thomas 
Lodge #232 was one of the eleven. 

The following year in April 18 56, a new Charter was 
issued by the Grand Lodge of Canada to replace the Irish 
Charter. It was numbered 21 on the registry of Grand 
Lodge. 

Two years after that when the two Grand Lodges 
finally united or, I suppose, more properly speaking, 
when the Ancient Grand Lodge of Canada affiliated with 
the recently organized Grand Lodge of Canada, there was a 
duplication of some of the Lodge numbers. Many of the 
Lodges were renumbered and St. Thomas #21 was renumbered 
#44. 



- 21 - 

In I860, 44' s jurisdiction covered an extensive area 
and during the next few years applications for membership 
were received from such places as Delaware, Shedden, 
Fingal, Aylmer, Dutton, Port Bruce, Vienna, Belmont and 
Sparta. 

During the 1860's and ' 7 0's, Masonry flourished in 
the St. Thomas area to such an extent that 44 was 
receiving on the average of 6 to 8 applications per month. 
Although they were holding Emergent meetings almost on 
a weekly basis they were unable to cope with all the 
degree work. So the members from the outlying centres 
were encouraged and assisted in applying to Grand Lodge 
for Charters to start Lodges in their respective centres. 
Most of these Lodges are still in existence but a few 
were short-lived. (It was in connection with a couple 
of these latter that I was unable to locate anyone with 
any knowledge of the Lodge records.) 

When the new Lodges were constituted, the members 
took their demits from 44 with the result that the 
membership dropped from around 90 in 1863 to about 40 in 
1870. By 1876, however, it had increased again to about 
70. 

At the regular meeting of 44 on June 5, 1873, a 
petition was approved and sent to Grand Lodge requesting 
the formation of another Lodge in St. Thomas. As a 
result, Grand Lodge issued a Charter in July 1874 for 
St. David's Lodge #302. 

In the year 1876, an Independent Grand Lodge Register 
of Ontario was organized in London. It proceeded to 
issue warrants for the formation of Lodges in the area, 
including one in St. Thomas designated Delta Lodge #4 
G.R.O. This Lodge succeeded in enlisting a number of 
prominent citizens who did not realize, of course, that 
they were joining a "clandestine" Lodge. Evidently, some 
members of 44 must have been involved because in the 
minutes of St. Thomas Lodge on March 2, 1877, it refers 
to a letter from Grand Lodge giving the names of "Brothers 
taking part in the recent seditious movement in London". 
A short time after that, the whole movement collapsed. 
At a meeting of 44 on March 3, 1881, twenty-three of the 
former Delta members were balloted on. Twenty were 
accepted and three rejected. 

In 1877, St. Thomas Lodge #44 sponsored another 
Lodge in St. Thomas known as Elgin Lodge #349. For some 
reason, it remained in operation for only eleven years 
and in 1888 surrendered its Charter. 

In 1918, St. Thomas Lodge #44 applied to Grand Lodge 
for "Centennial Recognition" on the basis that most of 
the Charter members of the first Lodge under the Irish 
Charter in 1853 had been members of St. Thomas Lodge #30 
when it suspended operations in 1822; and that the 



- 22 - 

intervening period was merely a hiatus in the Lodge 
operations. The application was rejected on the grounds 
that the original Charter for St. Thomas Lodge #30 was 
issued by a Schismatic Grand Lodge and therefore could 
not be recognized by the Grand Lodge of Canada. 

However, according to the minutes, they proceeded 
to hold Centennial Celebrations on their own; and in 
honour of the occasion, they petitioned Grand Lodge for 
yet another Lodge in the City. As a result, on September 
25, 1919, Talbot Lodge #546 was constituted. 

In 1953, we applied again for Centennial Recognition 
and, of course, on that occasion it was granted. I recall 
during our Centennial Celebration that some of the older 
members, who had been members in 1918, boasted that 
St. Thomas Lodge was the only Lodge in the Province to 
celebrate its Centennial on two occasions, 3 5 years apart. 

At the present time, all three Lodges - St. Thomas 
#44, St. David's #302 and Talbot #546 - are flourishing 
and all hold their meetings in the Masonic Temple. 

I am indebted for much of the foregoing information 
to the late V.W.Bro. Dr. George Kennedy. Dr. Kennedy was 
Master of 44 in 1903. In 1973 at the Lodge Installation 
in January, he occupied the Master's chair for a time - 
three score years and ten after being installed. Later 
that month a banquet was held in his honor, when the 
Grand Master, M.W.Bro. W.K. Bailey, attended, along with 
two past Grand Masters and several Grand Lodge officers. 
On that occasion, Dr. Kennedy was presented with an 
Honorary Life Membership by the Master of each Lodge 
in the District. 

Dr. Kennedy had been a member and officer in the 
Royal Arch for many years but left it till his later 
years to join the Scottish Rite. He received his 32nd 
Degree in Hamilton on November 9, 1974 when he was 99 
years of age. In 1976, at the age of one hundred, he 
attended another reunion of Moore Sovereign Consistory. 
Dr. Kennedy remained quite active, attending Lodge 
regularly, until his sudden death only a short time 
before his 75th anniversary as a Past Master. In conver- 
sation with Dr. Kennedy in 1973, he told me that he had 
been personally acquainted with Wor. Bro. Cor lis, first 
Master of St. David's Lodge 302 in 1873 and that he had 
known every master of that lodge since that time, and 
further that he had been personally acquainted with almost 
every Master of St. Thomas Lodge "44" and its predessor 
"232", since its inception in 1853. 

One cannot help but be amazed at the fortitude, 
stamina, and endurance of some of our Brethren in the 
early days of Masonry in the Province. For example, 
Mahlon Burwell, Master of the first Masonic Lodge in St. 
Thomas in 1818 was: a Colonel in the Militia; a land 



-.23 - 

surveyor for the Government from 1809-1840; M.P. for 
Middlesex and Oxford for 16 years; later represented the 
Town of London in the Legislature of Upper Canada 1836- 
1840 - during the years of the Rebellion; Registrar for 
Middlesex District and the Town of London from 1812 
until his death in 1846; Justice of the Peace; Chairman 
of the First Court of Quarter Sessions in London District; 
and a trustee on the School Board for the district of 
Watson's Corners for a number of years. 

Of course, we are all aware that our own first Grand 
Master, William Mercer Wilson, besides his many other 
duties and responsibilities, filled that high office for 
ten terms between 1855 and 1874, having no less than 
seven different Deputy Grand Masters serve under him. 

Brethren, we owe a great debt of gratitude to those 
early Masons who worked so diligently and tirelessly to 
lay the foundation resulting in the present state of the 
Craft. 

REVIEWS 

1. By V.W.Bro. L. Ferguson, member of St. David's Lodge 
No. 302, G.R.C., and a member of The Heritage Lodge 
No. 730. 

Worshipful Master and Brethren - First may I say I 
appreciate the fact that V.Wor.Bro. Vogan accepted the 
challenge to write this paper and second I thank Rt.Wor. 
Bro. Bruce for inviting me to review it. 

I felt sure when I approached Bro. Vogan that he 
would review our History in depth and inreading his pre- 
sentation and hearing of some of these and other events 
of our History he has done just that to my satisfaction 
and I hope yours. 

I have not reviewed his dates as presented but I am 
more than sure theat these are correct, and Burwell, 
Talbot Rapelje, Jarvis and Wilson and others are ever 
mentioned names in our History in St. Thomas and area. 

How unfortunate that many records were lost by fire 
in 1952 of which I well remember. Later that same year 
I was initiated into Masonry so I am comparitively young 
in Masonry when refering to dates as are shown in this 
paper, yet how fortunate we are that those mentioned are 
preserved and legible. 

I note with some concern and great interest that 
the Schismatic Charter mentioned in the paper, is in the 
posession of a Mr. Donald Anderson (whom I know well 
personally) but a non Mason. Can we as Masons gain 
possession of this outstanding Historical Document in 
this generation to be included in the archives of Masonry 
in St. Thomas or for the Grand Lodge of Canada in the 



- 24 - 

Province of Ontario. 

Brother Vogan has expressed respect for the dedication 
of Bro. Masons of many years ago; in conclusion may I 
add my respects and include the name of V.W.Bro. George 
T. Kennedy whom, we in the St. Thomas area have looked 
upon as Mr. Mason. Thank you Worshipful Master. 

V.Wor.Bro. L. Ferguson 

2. By R.W.Bro. Donald J. Emerick, member of Star of East 
Lodge No. 422, G.R.C., and a member of The Heritage 
Lodge No. 730. 

What's in a title? Some titles are humorous, others 
convey a feeling of intrigue, while others transmit to 
us love for a subject, place or interest. A title can 
also imbed in us a sense of curiosity. V.W.Bro. Vogan 
is to be congratulated for transmitting to us his love 
for Masonry in St. Thomas and also for creating the 
curiosity to draw our attention to this paper. 

Unfortunately V.W. Vogan could not be permitted to 
give us a year by year account because if even half of 
those years has as much to offer as the years between 
March 20, 1818 and July 6, 1822, we undoubtably would be 
on the edges of our seats awaiting the next happening 
in St. Thomas. 

I congratulate V.W.Bro. Vogan for his talk on the 
history of St. Thomas Masonry. He has researched his 
subject and presented the facts to us in a very capable 
manner. I did find some of the jumping back and forth 
in dates and places hard to fooolow at times but however, 
through his explanations these dates and places were set 
straight. 

It is also pleasing to note that after having read 
this history that Masonry in most districts and old lodges 
had many interesting happenings in their beginning which 
we as modern day Masons do not see or hear of when new 
lodges are started today. 

In closing I have one question, that being: If the 
original charter for St. Thomas 44 is in the possession 
of Mr. Donald Anderson could the lodge not obtain either 
it or a copy for their archives as it is history? 

Again my congratulations to you V.W.Bro. Vogan. We 
shall look forward to an update or expansion on this 
history. 

3. By W.Bro. Donald L. Cosens, member of St. David's 
Lodge No. 302, G.R.C., and a member of The Heritage 
Lodge No. 7 30. 



- 25 - 

V.Wor.Bro. Vogan is to be highly commended for his 
efforts in the research and preparation of this paper 
"History of Masonry in St. Thomas (1818-1881)". What 
a difficult task to undertake, and to present such a 
comprehensive topic in less than one hour is remarkable. 
To my knowledge, only once before has such a presentation 
been made — that by Wor. Bro. J.S. Robertson, a past 
master of Bro. Vogan 1 s mother Lodge "Old 44", at the 
regular meeting, April 4, 1913, on the occasion of the 
celebration of 100 years of Masonry in St. Thomas. 

I think that Bro. Vogan has given us, and future 
historians, much to work with, particularly in the St. 
Thomas area, this present work will be an invaluable 
starting point for a more extensive history. 

In reviewing I shall comment primarily on omissions — 
my primary criticism of this paper would have to be the 
omission of references. My task would have been many 
times easier with added footnotes. Any seriously 
interested person, now or later, would thank the writer 
many times over for source notes. I should think that 
this Lodge, and in particular, the Program Committee 
would insist on footnotes with references on almost all 
research papers presented. 

The subject, "Masonry in St. Thomas (1818-1981)" is 
somewhat misleading. I happen to belong to a lodge other 
than the one Bro. Vogan hails from, namely, St. David's 
302, and while our history does not go back as far as 
"Old 44", we do have 109 years behind us — a mere youngster, 
I suppose! With only four lines in this paper we are 
relegated to history! There is also another thriving 
lodge in St. Thomas, Talbot 546. Now in its 64th year 
and still growing, it too has an illustrious background. 
This presentation appears to me, to be the story of St. 
Thomas Lodge 44. 

Bro. Vogan states that all the records of the St. 
Thomas lodges are "complete and available". Presumably, 
he again means St. Thomas Lodge 44. Certainly most of 
the records of St. David's Lodge and Talbot Lodge do not 
go back prior to the Masonic Temple fire of 1951, when 
all of the minute books and most of the registers of 
these two lodges were burned. St. David's does have, 
fortunately its first register of members dating from 1873. 

Mahlon Burwell as stated, had joined Bertie Lodge 
#9 at Fort Erie. This was apparently the tenth lodge 
under the First Provincial Grand Lodge at Niagara. An 
interesting sidelight to Burwell 's early Masonic life is, 
I believe, worth relating. Burwell had been received 
into membership in the Quakers, or Friends, as they 
called themselves, on November 5, 1800. By 1804, he had 
joined the Mason's. The minutes of the Meeting (of 
Friends) of December 5th, states, "Mahlon Burwell - joined 



- 26 - 

Freemasons Society - frequents their lodges, and holds 
forth strange doctrines in denying that supernatural 
light that's placed within us. He makes use of the 
compliments of the world, and teaches his scholars the 
same — . " . On May 1, 1805, a committee formed to investi- 
gate the Mahlon Burwell case, reported to the Meeting 
that " — they believe further labor would be useless, some 
of them having had several opportunities with him without 
any prospect of his being reclaimed." An "Essay of 
Disownment" was prepared against Burwell and read at the 
Meeting of June 5, 1805. A copy of this "Essay" was 
to have been duly served on Burwell, and he was informed 
of his "right to appeal and repent." On July 3, 1805, it 
is noted, "Testimony against Mahlon Burwell delivered." 
No further mention of Burwell is made in these records. 1 
He later joined the Church of England. 2 He was an ambiti- 
ous individual and his cause would be more easily achieved 
with membership in the Established Church. 3 

We now go back to the last decade of the 18th Century 
and the establishment of the First Provincial Grand Lodge 
under William Jarvis. "The British Fraternal Society of 
the Royal York Craft" — this designation is not familiar 
to me. Was it so designated on the "Decree" that appointed 
Jarvis? I had always been under the impression that the 
appointment came from the "Grand Lodge of England (Antients) 

It seems remarkable, although every source seems to 
confirm the fact, that Jarvis had only been initiated a 
month prior to his appointment as Provincial Grand Master. 
Did Jarvis ever receive his second and third degree? 
Further research in England might be enlightening. 

At this point in the paper it might have been 
appropriate to mention a previous lodge that operated 
possibly within a few miles of what is today the city of 
St. Thomas. It is not likely the lodge was situated at 
a greater distance than 15 miles from the first lodge 
(1818) in the village of St. Thomas. The lodge that I 
refer to was No. 14. The warrant of said lodge was 
issued in 1799 6 by R.W.Bro. Jarvis. It was first known 
as "No. 14, Southwold" and later as "No. 14, Howard". 7 
The lodge was also called the "Lodge on the Thames" and 
was said to have originally been a branch of Zion Lodge 
No. 10, Detroit. Zion Lodge records contain many refer- 
ences to brethren of No. 14.8 M.W.Bro. John Ross Robertson 
in his "History of Freemasonry states, " — The exact 
location of the lodge was on the London road. It met at 
Lee's tavern, which was on Lot. 26, north, on Talbot Road 
East, Southwold." 9 Robertson mentions several brethren as 
members of this lodge including Dr. (John) Rolph. 10 This 
is unlikely as Dr. Rolph was only seven years of age at 
the turn of the 19th Century. 11 Jacob Lee is given as a 
member 12 and the fact that they met at Lee's tavern would 
indicate a possible connection with the later St. Thomas 
Lodge No. 30. At least four members of the Lee family 
were members of No. 30. Bro. James Flemming was the 
master of No. 14 in 1799. 13 Flemming was reputedly the 



- 27 - 

first white settler in what is present-day Elgin County, 
having located in the Township of Aldborough, on the 
River Thames in 17 96.14 no mention of Lodge No. 14 
appears after 1805.15 

We now come to the Schismatic lodge — St. Thomas Lodge 
No. 30. Bro. Vogan states that Burwell and other brethren 
sent their petition for a charter in the fall of 1817. 
What is the source for this date? 

I should here state that I have recently had an 
opportunity to examine the charter of St. Thomas Lodge 
No. 30 and would like to comment on this historic treasure. 
At the top in very large letters appears the designation 
"UPPER CANADA". There is no reference to "The Grand Lodge 
of Niagara" but simply the "Provincial Grand Lodge", the 
implication being (and this is my interpretation) that 
it would have been styled the "Provincial Grand Lodge of 
Upper Canada". The charter is under seal, but the seal 
is broken and it cannot be ascertained of what grand lodge 
this seal would be. It is signed by Robert Kerr, Provin- 
cial Grand Master, but their is no indication as to 
whether he styled himself "Most Worshipful" or "Right 
Worshipful". 

I have a copy of the original warrant of Lodge No. 
26, Township of Townsend, predecessor of Norfolk Lodge 
No. 10 GRC^o which was issued by the same Schismatic 
Grand Lodge at Niagara, and by the same Prov. G.M. Robert 
Kerr. This charter is dated June 24, 1812. The two 
charters or warrants are similar in most respects but 
with one very important difference. In the earlier charter 
of Townsend Lodge 26, it recites in part that the "Grand 
Lodge (of England) did appoint our Right Worshipful 
Brother Robert Kerr, Esquire, of Upper Canada & & & to be 

Provincial Grand Master in the said Province ." In 

the charter of St. Thomas Lodge 30, issued almost six 
years later, it recites in the body of the instrument, 
" — did appoint our Right Worshipful Brother William Jarvis 
— to be Provincial Grand Master of the said Province — ." 
These differences in the two warrants are, I believe, 
significant and raise several questions that should probably 
be researched more extensively. 

Both warrants empower the Prov. G.M. "to grant 
Warrants or Dispensations to such worthy Brethren as 
should apply for the same according to the Ancient form." 
One other minor but significant observation I made was, 
that the charter was issued to "St. Thomas^ Lodge No. 30 
in the Township of Yarmouth." I have never seen this 
lodge so designated before, that is with the apostrophe 
following the last letter "s" in St. Thomas. 

Bro. Vogan states that 13 meetings wereheld between 
November 5, 1818 and July 6, 1822. These dates, he says 
were the first and last meetings held by this lodge. I 
disagree with the statement that only 13 meetings were 
ever held. Bro Vogan further states that there is 



- 28 - 

preserved the minutes of four meetings in their entirety 
and parts of the minutes of nine other meetings. In my 
research I have found the minutes of the four meetings, 
viz: July 29, October 28 and November 25, 1819 and July 
6, 1822. The "parts of minutes" that Bro. Vogan speaks 
of are not minutes, nor parts of minutes, but only frag- 
ments of notes and possibly some financial records of 
the lodge. These fragments and records, together with 
the actual minutes (four in number) referred to above, 
provide us with concrete "evidence" that there were at 
least 13 meetings. But why just 13? Could there not 
have been more? 

We know the lodge received its charter March 20, 1818, 
now it seems unlikely that the brethren would wait seven 
months to hold their first meeting. Furthermore there 
is no reason to believe that the meetings were not regular, 
that is monthly. Certainly the lodge was busy at the 
beginning. If we look at the early records we will see 
that from November 5, 1818 to February 4, 1819 they 
raised eight brethren. For the calendar year 1819, they 
raised a total of eight and for 1820 four were raised. 
Not really a bad showing when one considers the size 
of the lodge — probably never exceeding 25 or 30 members 
at any one time. More correctly, the date November 5, 1818 
is merely the earliest recorded date of a meeting — but 
not surely the first meeting that the lodge convened. 
Likewise, July 6, 1822 is simply the last meeting of which 
we have any evidence. Yes, activities may have been 
suspended and this could have been the last meeting, but 
we can't state this positively. There is a possibility, 
remote as it may be, that the lodge did continue. 

Bro. Vogan states that Bro. George Lee was the first 
candidate initiated in this lodge. Nothing in the 
records indicates this is the case. We have the fact that 
he was initiated on July 29, 1819, this date being the 
earliest of which we have any minutes of the lodge. But 
we do, certainly, have evidence of earlier meetings (in 
the records, not the minutes) . at which there were at 
least eight brethren raised before Lee was initiated. I 7 

It would be an interesting study to establish, if 
possible where and when the charter members and affiliated 
members of Lodge No. 30 originally joined the Craft. 

Bro. Vogan states that in 1904 or 1905 the late V.Wor. 
Bro. Kennedy took steps to preserve the minutes of the 
meetings of this early lodge. Let me quote from the 
minutes of St. Thomas Lodge 44 on May 7, 1914, "Dr. 
Leitch on behalf of Dr. J.H. Coyne, Registrar presented 
the lodge with a number of very interesting records of 
St. Thomas Lodge No. 30, dealing with the institution of 
Masonry in the early days of St. Thomas." I personally 
recall Dr. Kennedy telling me that these early records 
had been given to the lodge by Dr. Coyne, who was not a 
mason. His father, William Coyne, was active in the 
early years of "44" and it was probably through his father 



- 29 - 

that he came by these Masonic papers. I think that at 
one time William Coyne was an officer in "44" and an 
account book of the lodge, just after its formation in 
1853 (At that time it was still 232 IR) , still rests with 
a portion of the Coyne Papers in the Elgin County Pioneer 
Museum in St. Thomas. William Coyne's name appears at 
the top of the first page of this book. 

It is stated that Dr. Elijah Duncombe was a member 
of Lodge No. 30 when it disbanded. Dr. Duncombe' s eldest 
son Charles Spencer Duncombe was born in Middleburg, New 
York State, November 18, 1821, and it was not until after 
that date that the family moved to St. Thomas, sometime 
prior to October 13, 1822. I 8 While this arrival date in 
1822 would not necessarily preclude his susequently 
becoming a member, if indeed the lodge was still function- 
ing, we have no proof that he ever belonged to No. 30. 
We do however, have excellent data to prove that he did 
join Mount Moriah Lodge No. 20, Westminster. He was 
initiated June 9, 1835, passed October 6, 1835 and raised 
November 3, 1835. 19 It was only three weeks after Dr. 
Elijah Duncombe received his third degree, that is, on 
November 26, 1835, that the brethren of three Upper 
Canada lodges, including Mount Moriah No. 20, attempted 
to organize their own grand lodge. ^ As Bro. Vogan has 
stated Dr. Elijah's brother, Dr. Charles Duncombe was 
chosen Provincial Grand Master. 

We now come to 1853 and the installation of the first 
worshipful master of St. Thomas Lodge 232 I.R. on June 
24, 1853.21 Those brethren who assisted at this instal- 
lation were interesting individuals: Wor. Bro. (Wm. D.) 
Hale, the first W.M. of Middlesex Lodge No. 211 I.R. 
(Port Stanley, CW. ) . He had been initiated in St. John's 
Lodge 209 I.R. (London, CW.) in 1850. 

Wor. Bro. Wilson 22 (Captain Thompson Wilson) of St. 
George's Lodge 895 E.R. (London CW.) was a most active 
mason of the day. Previously a member of 209 I.R., he 
became the first W.M. of St. George's #895 E.R. in 1852 
and he was the first W.M. of The Tuscan Lodge 195, G.R.C 
in 1868. He was D.D.G.M. of London Dist. in 1857 and 
1859. He was the first First Principal of St. George's 
Chapter No. 5 R.A.M. in 1854 (served 9 terms) . He served 
as Grand Sup't for 4 years 1860-1864. He was first 
Commander of Richard Coeur de Lion No. 4 Preceptory in 
1857 (served 5 terms). His activities in the Scottish 
Rite were no less spectacular. He received his 18° in 
Invicta Chapter, Woolwich, England sometime prior to 
April 18, 1868. On July 10, 1868 he received his 32° 
and on the same day became an officer of Moore Sovereign 
Consistory at Hamilton. Three days later on July 13th he 
became the first M.W.S. of London Sovereign Chapter of Rose 
Croix, which position he held for two years. On July 14, 
1868 he received the 33° from the Supreme Council of 
England. 22B 



- 30 - 

2 T 
Wor. Bro. (James) Daniel J (or probably more correctly 

"Daniell") later became Judge of the County Court of 

Prescott and Russell. 2 3 A He was a member of Mount Moriah 

Lodge No. 20, P.G.L. or No. 773 E.R. and on Aug. 29, 1845 

he sat in Lodge with Dr. Elijah Duncombe. Bro. Daniell 

was the last W.M, of Mount Moriah Lodge in 1846. The 

Charter was surrendered and he joined St. John's 209, I.R. 

He was W.M. of "209" in 1851, 1853 and 1854. He was D.D.G. 

M. in 1856. He was probably the first First Principal of 

St. John's Chapter R.A.M. London and was Grand Supt. from 

1858 to i860. 23B 

Regarding the formation of St. David's Lodge, let me 
add the following. Although Bro. Vogan states that "44" 
"approved" of the petition for the formation, such is not 
quite the case. On May 1, 1873, one Josiah Corlis, a 
member of Norfolk Lodge No. 10, Simcoe, was favourably 
balloted upon for affiliation in St. Thomas Lodge 44.24 
At this same meeting the following appears, "A Com. from 
Bros. W.E. Smith (a non-member), J. Corlis, and H.G. Hunt 
(a non-member) requesting the consent of this lodge to 
form another lodge in this town was then read." 2 5 After 
"considerable discussion" the , communication was laid over 
to the next regular meeting. 26 At the next meeting (June 
5, 1873), at which the above three brothers were present, 
the matter "concerning the formation of another lodge in 
this town, came up for discussion" and a motion was duly 
passed "that this petition be sent to Grand Lodge to 
decide." 2 ? Dispensation to form the new lodge was granted 
on August 4, 1873- 28 

At the Regular Meeting of "44" on August 7, 1873, 
the following motion was passed: "-- that on account of 
Bro. J. Corlis using unmasonic language towards the W.M. 
that Bro. Corlis be requested to attend the next Reg. Com. 
and explain." A further motion at the same meeting was 
passed: " — that a committee of 3 be appointed to address 
(the) M.W. G.M. for an explanation concerning the Dispen- 
sation granted to St. David's Lodge. " 2 9 At the regular 
meeting of "44" on September 4, 1873, Bro. J. Corlis (By 
now the Charter Worshipful Master of St. David's Lodge.) 
was granted his demit. 30 This seems to have ended the 
St. David's Lodge question so far as "44" was concerned, 
as there is no further mention of St. David's in the 
minutes of "44" until August 27, 1874 when mention is 
made regarding the Dedication of St. David's Lodge. 31 
The charter for St. David's Lodge No. 302 was issued 
July 9, 1874. 3 2 

As is evident from the preceding quotations from the 
minutes of "44", there can be little doubt that "44" has 
little claim as a sponsor of "302". St. David's Lodge was 
not formed in the usual manner, that is, members of a 
local lodge (In this case "44") breaking away to form a 
smaller lodge with perhaps a younger membership. Because 
of the sudden appearance of the railways in St. Thomas in 
the early ' 70's, and the various persons who accompanied 
them, naturally several masons were among the newcomers. 33 



- 31 - 

Of the 32 charter members, at least 23 different lodges 
were represented. Only one of the Charter members was 
a member of "44" and he was suspended three years later! 
From I873 until 1900 only two other members of "^" 
affiliated with "302" — one of them became Master in 1885.34 

Bro. Vogan states that "most" of the charter members 
of the first lodge under the Irish charter in I853 had 
been members of St. Thomas No. 30 . This is not really the 
case. Of the 11 charter members listed at the beginning of 
the first minute book of St. Thomas Lodge 232, only two 
-- Benjamin Willson and John Ellison Sen'r. were members 
of the earlier Lodge No. 30.35 

Bro. Vogan tells us that St. Thomas Lodge "44" applied 
for "Centennial Recognition" in 1918. I was not aware of 
this request and would appreciate the source of this infor- 
mation. Bro. Vogan further states that the application for 
recognition in 1918 was rejected because St. Thomas Lodge 
30 was chartered by a Schismatic Grand Lodge. I might 
mention that Townsend Lodge No. 26, the lodge that prece- 
ded Norfolk Lodge No. 10 in Simcoe, was also granted its 
first charter (in 1812) by the same Schismatic G.L. In 
1937 the brethren of Norfolk No. 10 observed the 125th 
Anniversary of their lodge with the Deputy Grand Master, 
William J. Dunlop being present. 36 Now I realize that 
circumstances are not quite the same. Norfolk Lodge can 
prove an almost unbroken history since its inception, 
however, it was, like St. Thomas Lodge 30 > chartered by 
the Schismatic G.L. and this fact should not have been the 
reason for Grand Lodge refusing, if indeed it did, an 
application for recognition in 1918. 

I might add that Talbot Lodge 546 was formed in the 
more conventional manner, that is, certain members of the 
older lodge asking for the blessing of their lodge, then 
breaking away on their own. When the request to form Jalbot 
Lodge came to St. Thomas Lodge 44, December 5, 1918, it was 
duly moved and adopted "that the request be granted and the 
formation of a new lodge be recommended. "37 Rather different 
than the circumstances 45 years earlier regarding St. 
David's beginnings! 

Worshipful Sir, I admit I have spent a great deal of 
time in researching this subject and far too long in 
presenting my review to you tonight. Again let me commend 
V.W.Bro. Vogan on a fine paper. I would hope he will 
accept my comments and criticism in a positive constructive 
manner . 



32 - 



Editor's Note: Re: Authority of R.W.Bro. William Jarvis, 
Grand Master of Masons in the Province of Upper Canada. 

Much discussion has surrounded the question, "did Wm. 
Jarvis have the authority to issue Warrants for the forma- 
tion of new lodges?" Because of the various interpretations 
offered by a number of masonic scholars, the following 
extract from a fac-simile of the original Jarvis Warrant, 
as presented by John Ross Robertson in his "The History of 
Freemasonry in Canada", Vol. I, page 342, is presented 
for your appraisal: 

"... in order to remedy the Inconveniences arising 
from the delays and distance in communicating with this 
Grand Lodge upon various occasions by the Warranted Lodges 
in Upper Canada held under our authority and to facilitate 
the Establishment of new Lodges, and in order more effect- 
ually and speedily to rectify and determine ALL Masonic 
differences and disputes and controversies if any such 
should arise BETWEEN the Brethren now resident in the 
said province of Upper Canada IT WAS this day in Grand Lodge 
RESOLVED THAT a Warrant be granted appointing a provincial 
Grand Master for the province of Upper Canada who shall 
be invested with the full and ample powers privileges and 
authority by the Constitutions of Masonry annexed to and 
vested in the said office of provincial Grand Master IN 
PURSUANCE whereof WE DO hereby Nominate Constitute and 
appoint our trusty and Well beloved Brother WILLIAM JARVIS 
Esquire of Upper Canada aforesaid GRAND MASTER of MASONS in 
the said province and Invest our said Right Worshipful 
Brother with full and ample powers privileges and Authority 
as aforesaid hereby authorizing and — impowering our said 
Right Worshipful Brother to Grant Dispensations for the 
holding of Lodges and making of Free Masons to such 
Brethren as shall be sufficiently qualified and duly 
recommended to recieve the same in order that such Lodges 
and Free Masons may be by Us and Our Successors duly 
congregated and formed into regular Warranted Lodges 
according to the most ancient custom of the craft in all 
ages and Nations throughout the World in Order to which 
the said Dispensations shall continue in force for the 
space of twelve Calendar Months from the Time of issuing 
the same respectively and no longer" . . . 

The absence of punctuation marks may shift emphasis 
here and there in the exact meaning or interpretation, 
and perhaps the use of the word "congregated" in place of 
what we assume to mean constituted may cause some concern. 
Nevertheless, a close examination of the above wording 
would suggest that Jarvis was given authority to establish 
new lodges by granting dispensations for holding lodges 
for a period of time not to exceed 12 months and similarly 
for making of Freemasons, until such Lodges and Freemasons 
were regularly warranted by the Grand Lodge in England. 
Hence it would appear that Jarvis did not have the authority 
to Warrant new lodges. 



33 - 



The following information was received from W.Bro. 
Cosens after the meeting and are included in these 
proceedings for the benefit of those who may wish to 
research this subject further. The numbers are coded in 
the body of W.Bro. Cosens' Review. Reference numbers 
4 and 5 have been deleted as not being applicable. 



REFERENCES 



1. Quaker Archives U.W.O. - Minutes of Pelham Meeting 
of Friends. 

2. CO. Ermatinger - The Story of Old St. Thomas Church / 
there is "recorded in the County Registry Office, 
namely a deed dated in 1841 from the Church wardens 
to Mahlon Burwell of pews 4 and 14, consideration 
6." 

3. J. E. Middleton, Fred Landon - The Province of 
Ontario - A History 1927 Vol. 1. 

"The Constitution (1791) reserved the lands (the 
Clergy Reserves) "for a Protestant Clergy." Dr. 
Strachan and the officials of Government inter- 
preted that phrase in the narrowest way. To them 
the only Protestant clergyman was one in Anglican 
Orders, and the only form of education worthy of 
government support was that under the control of 
the Church of England." 

4. deleted 

5. deleted 

6. John Ross Robertson - History of Freemasonry in 
Canada 1900 Vol. 1, p. 367. 

7. ibid p. 732. 

8. J. S. Robertson. Sketch of Masonic History 1918, 
pp 5, 6. A speech given at the Reg. Meeting of 
St. Thomas Lodge 44 to commemorate the 100th 
Anniversary of the founding of Masonry in St. Thomas. 



10. 


ibid 


11. 


CO. 


12. 


J.R. 


13. 


ibid 


14. 


CO. 


15. 


J.R. 


16. 


An H 



- 34 - 

J. R. Robertson - History of Freemasonry p. 731, 2 
but see also p. 211, 568, 569, 708. 

p. 732. 

Ermatinger, The Talbot Regime , 1904, p. 108. 

Robertson - History of Freemasonry , p. 732. 
p. 568. 

Ermatinger, Talbot Regime, p. 36. 

Robertson, History - p. 732. 
An Historical Sketch of Norfolk Lodge No. 10 1812-1962. 
pp 20, 21. 

17. Masonic Relics relating to St. Thomas Lodge 30 
containing original minutes of four meetings of this 
lodge together with other accounts etc. In posses- 
sion of R.W. Bro. .Angus Walton, Secretary of St. 
Thomas Lodge 44. < 1982 ) 

18. Kathryn Morris Wilkinson - Duncombes in America , 1965, 
p. 32, 44, 66. "Elijah had come to St. Thomas at the 
time of his father's death (October 13) in 1822." 

19. Letter to Donald L. Cosens from Allan Talbot n.d. 
about 1974. 

20. W. McLeod, Editor, Whence Come We? Freemasonry in 
Ontario 1764-1980 p. 

21. Minutes, St. Thomas Lodge 232 I.R. First Volume. In 
possession of R.W. Bro. Angus Walton, Secretary, St. 
Thomas Lodge 44 G.R.C (1982). 

21a. Historical Sketch of St. John's Lodge No. 20, G.R.C 
London, 1957 p. 14. 

22. Minutes St. Thomas Lodge 232. 

22a. History of the County of Middlesex . Goodspeed, W.A. 

& C.L., Publishers, 1889. Reprint - Mika Studio, 

1972, p. 323-326, 335, 340-344. 
22b. The History of the Supreme Council 3 3°, A. & A.S.R. 

of Canada, 1874-1974 . 1978. p. 10, 11, 14, 16. 

23. Minutes St. Thomas Lodge 232. 

23a. Transactions of the London and Middlesex Historical 
Society, Part VII 1916. The Bench and the Bar in 
the Early Days. David J. Hughes, Judge, CC Elgin, 
p. 18. 

23b. History, County of Middlesex. Goodspeed, p. 323-326, 
339, 344. 

24. Minutes St. Thomas Lodge 44. Reg. Meeting May 1, 
1873. 

25. ibid. 

26. ibid. 

27. Minutes St. Thomas L. 44. Reg. Meeting June 5, 1873. 

28. D. L. Cosens Address "The Founding of St. David's 
Lodge 302" at Reg. meeting of St. David's Lodge 302. 
Nov. 18 1965. 

29. Minutes St. Thomas Lodge 44 Reg. Meeting Aut. 7, 1873. 
29a. ibid. 

30. Minutes St. Thomas Lodge 44 Reg. Meeting Sept. 4, 1873. 

31. Minutes St. Thomas Lodge 44 Emergent Meeting Aug. 27, 
1873. 

32. Souvenir Program. Centennial Celebration St. David's 
Lodge 302. Oct. 27, 1973. Reproduced copy of replaced 
warrant dated Feb. 2, 1951. The original charter was 
destroyed in fire of Jan. 28, 1951. 



- 35 - 

33. D.L. Cosens address. Nov. 18, 1965. 

34. Original Roll of Members of St. David's Lodge 302, 
that survived the Mas. Temple fire of 1951. In 
possession of the Sec. of St. David's Lodge 302, 
V.W.Bro. C. Mellor (1982). 

35. From speech of V.Wor.Bro. (Dr.) Geo. T. Kennedy, 
the occasion of his 70th Anniversary as a Mason. 

36. An Historical Sketch of Norfolk Lodge No. 10. A.F. 
& P.M. 1962. 

37. Minutes St. Thomas Lodge 44. Reg. meeting Dec. 5, 
1918. 

W.Bro. Cosens also included the following charts 
with comments: 

Chart 1 

1853 -54 -55 -56 -57 -58 -59 -60 

Port Bruce 1 1 

Aylmer 1 2 3NL 

Belmont 2 2 

Vienna 4 13 1 

Port Burwell 1 

Port Stanley 3 2 NL 

Delaware 1 1 

Fingal 1 NL 

Sparta 1 

Chart 1 shows the initiation of candidates from outlying 
areas in "44" from 1853 to 1860. 

Between 1860 and 187 only Belmont was supplying 
candidates from outside St. Thomas and the immediate area. 
I found no candidates from 1853 to 1870 from Shedden or 
Dutton. It should be noted that my information is based 
on actual initiations, whereas Bro. Vogan refers to 
"applications received". However, I don't think there 
should be a great difference here. 

I do not agree with Bro. Vogan that the lodge was 
receiving 6 to 8 applications per month. If they were 
receiving so many applications and presumably initiating 
almost as many, this would mean about 70 new members each 
year - see Para. 3 on page 21. The implication here is 
that the Lodge during any of these years had more than 
90 members. This chart shows the actual initiations and 
affiliations from 1860 to 1866 and 1871. (average 
number - 6 new members - healthy but not excessive: ) 





Initiations 


1860 


7 


1861 


2 


1862 


3 


1863 


1 


1864 


8 


1865 


6 


1866 


7 


1867 


2 


1868 


1 


1869 


] 


1870 


1 


1871 


15 



36 - 

Affiliations 



(incomplete) 
Not available 
Not available 
Not available 



Bro. Vogan states that "they were holding Emergent Meetings 
almost on a weekly basis". A perusal of the minutes shows 
this not to be so - possibly one emergent a month' 

Following a brief informal discussion, R.W.Bro. 
Bruce then called on V.W.Bro. Vogan to summarize the 
program. 

V.W.Bro. Vogan thanked the reviewers for their compli- 
mentary and constructive remarks; but rather than addres- 
sing himself to all of the comments, he thought the Brethren 
might prefer to learn more of the controversey surrounding 
the first woman Freemason and he therefore recited the 
following experience from a visit to Ireland in 198 0. 

THE LADY FREEMASON 

by 

V. W. Bro. G. H. Vogan 

I read, with interest, your Lodge Bulletin in which 
was recorded the proceedings of an emergent meeting held 
in Sudbury on October 3, 1981. I was particularly 
interested in the paper prepared by R.W.Bro. Runnalls 
on "Women in Freemasonry". 

The very first one he mentioned was an Irish girl 
by the name of Elizabeth St. Leger. His version of her 
story was that she had been asleep in a room in her 
father's house while the Masons were holding a meeting 
in an adjoining room. She awoke and removed part of the 
partition to observe what was going on. She was discovered 
and was later initiated into the Lodge. 

Wor. Bro. Boersma, in his review, had a different 
version of her story. His version was that she had hid 
in a grandfather's clock in the same room where the 
Masons were meeting. He said, "The good lady passed 
away in 177 3, and there were those who claimed that she 
was initiated in Lodge #71 in the City of Cork." However, 
that Lodge didn't meet till 1777 - four years after the 



37 



lady had died, 



R.W.Bro. Runnalls' version is similar to that which 
is recorded in Mackey's Encyclopedia of Freemasonry. 
Wor. Bro. Boersma's version is much the same as that which 
appeared in the 'Freemason's Quarterly Review' of 1839; 
which in turn was supposed to have been copied from a 
Cork newspaper in the same year. 

Wor. Bro. Bain, in his summarization of the discus- 
sions had this to say: "With reference to Elizabeth 
Leger, no doubt her story, along with others, has gained 
in color over the years of telling." Then he wenton to 
say: "At this late date there is no way of being absolutely 
certain of the facts." 

Brethren, I ask you to keep in mind these three 
references to this lady while I relate an interesting 
experience I had in Ireland in October, 198 0. 

Several years ago, I read a book by an Irsih author 
named Brian McMahon. In it he told about travelling around 
the country, visiting places of special interest. One 
such place was the tow of Newmarket in County Cork. He 
said he went there to visit the grave of the only woman 
Freemason in the world. He said her name was Mary Barry 
and that she later married a Viscount Doneraille. When 
he arrived at the cemetery, he found a padlock on the 
gate. (To use his words) he had to scramble over the 
fence to visit her grave. 

I was interested and intrigued with this tory. When 
my wife and I were touring in Southern Ireland in October, 
1980, we decided to go to Newmarket to see if we could find 
this grave and perhaps get a photograph of the inscription 
on the tombstone. 

We had no trouble finding the old cemetery. The 
rusty padlock was still on the gate so I, too, had to 
"scramble over the fence". That wasn't too much of a 
problem since the fence was a stone wall about three feet 
high with a convenient three-step stile leading over it. 

I was very disappointed at the sad state of neglect of 
that cemetery. Many of the gravestones were completely 
overgrown with long grass and weeds; the others were so 
weather-beaten and eroded it was impossible to make out 
any inscription on them. 

I was determined I wasn't going to leave Newmarket 
without attempting to find someone who might know some- 
thing about the story. 

As we were driving up the street, I spotted an 
elderly gentleman standing in the doorway of his cottage. 
I went over to him, introduced myself and asked him if 
he knew anything about a woman Mason being buried in the 



- 38 - 

local cemetery. He told me his name was Michael O'Calahan 
and that he was a retired letter-carrier. He said he 
remembers, when he was a small boy, of hearing a story 
about a woman Fremason being buried down in the old 
Protestant Cemetery. He said: "There hasn't been anyone 
buried in that cemetery for over 100 years". I could 
well believe that, considering the condition it was in. 

He said: "There is an old lady by the name of Mrs. 
Sullivan who might know something about the case". "She 
lives only a few doors down the street so I'll take you 
down and introduce you." 

I walked down with Michael and met Mrs. Sullivan. 
She wasn't able to throw any more light on the subject 
than Michael had. She said, "Maybe Paddy McSweeny, a 
retired school teacher, who lives up there on the hill, 
might know something about it from his History books." 

Michael said, "If you can make room for me in the 
car, I'll ride up with you and introduce you to Mr. 
McSweeny" . We moved part of our luggage in the back 
seat of our small, rented car to make room for Michael. 
Then drove up and met Mr. McSweeny. When I asked Mr. 
McSweeny about the woman, I told him her name was Mary 
Barry and that she was married to a Viscount Doneraille. 

Mr. McSweeny said he didn't recall ever having heard 
the name Mary Barry or ever having seen it in a History 
book. "But", he said, "when you mention Viscount Doner- 
aille", (he pointed to a big old house down in the valley) 
"that is known as the Doneraille House." He said, "Many 
years ago a Viscount Doneraille lived in that house with 
his family". He said, "He was a judge and he had turned 
one of the rooms into a Court Room where he held his 
Court sessions". He said, "According to the History books, 
the Freemasons used to hold their Lodge meetings in that 
Court Room" . 

Mr. McSweeny said he couldn't recall ever having 
heard or read anything about a woman Freemason being 
buried in a local cemetery. "But", he said, "if such an 
event did occur, there likely would be a record of it in 
the Archives at the Town Hall". 

Michael and I got back in the car and drove down to 
the Town Hall where he introduced me to the Town Clerk, 
a Mister Sean O'Connor. When I told Mr. O'Connor what 
information I was after, he said, "The records in our 
Archives date back over 300 years and unless you knew 
what year it occurred, it would be next to impossible to 
find it". Then, he said, "I would like to show you some- 
thing in the next room" . 

He led the way into an adjoining room. On one of 
the walls of that room was a very large genealogical 
chart. It was divided into three sections. The first 



- 39 - 

section was prepared as a project in conjunction with 
the Town's Centennial in 1728. It listed the names of 
the Town officials and other important personages in the 
Town when it was first incorporated in 1628. Then it 
listed their descendents through the years. 

The second section was a project prepared for the 
Town's Bicentennial in 1828. The same procedure was 
followed then. The third section was a project for the 
Town's Tercentennial in 1928. 

The chart listed, literally, hundreds of names. We 
examined it and found the name Viscount Doneraille 
appearing near the latter part of the 17th century. It 
appeared again, several times, in the 18th century. 
Nowhere in connection with any of those names was the 
name "Mary Barry" to be found. 

Mr. O'Connor said, "There is one old gentleman in 
town who might be able to provide some information on 
this subject." He said, "His name is Charles McCarthy." 

Michael said, "Oh, I know Charlie McCarthy real well.' 
"I'll take Mr. Vogan over and introduce him". By that 
time I was beginning to feel as though I might be getting 
a bit of a runaround. 

When we were getting into the car, my wife, who was 
driving, leaned over and whispered, I hope you're not 
letting them make a fool of you." Of course, she wasn't 
privy to any of our conversations or interviews. 

When we arrived at Mr. McCarthy's home, he met us 
at the door. After introductions, he invited us into the 
house. Mr. McCarthy was a man I would judge to be well 
on in his eighties. He was a widower and lived alone. 
From all external appearances, he was a very fine, upright 
gentleman and a scholar. He certainly had a very keen, 
alert mind. I might add, on the other hand, Michael 
O'Calahan had a tendency to be a bit naive. He was most 
anxious to cooperate but I had the impression he wasn't 
too bright. 

In the house, Mr. McCarthy offered us chairs around 
a dining room table. I sat at one end, Mr. McCarthy at 
the other, and Michael sat behind the table. 

When we were seated Mr. McCarthy said to me, "What 
can I do for you, Mr. Vogan?" When I told him what 
information I was after he just looked at me but never 
uttered a word for what seemed like two or three minutes 
(it was probably about 30 or 40 seconds but it seemed 
much longer). Then he bowed his head, as if in deep 
thought, or contemplation, or maybe saying a prayer. When 
he raised his head he looked directly at me and said, Mr. 



- 40 - 

Vogan, I think I can satisfy your curiosity". Then he 
turned to Michael and said, "If you will turn around and 
open the top drawer of that cupboard behind you, you'll 
find a book. I'd like you to give that book to Mr. Vogan.' 

When the book was laid on the table in front of me, I 
could hardly believe my eyes. There, like a brilliant ray 
from the rising sun, was a book entitled, "The Lady Free- 
mason". It was a hard-cover book in an excellent state 
of preservation and printed on very good quality paper. 

Mr. McCarthy told me that was his most prized posses- 
sion. He said, "It has been handed down from father to 
son through four generations". He told me a number of 
copies had been printed in the late 1850 's for private 
distribution. None was ever on the public market. He 
said, "So far as I know, this is the only copy still in 
existence". He said, "Two years ago, when the town 
celebrated its 350th birthday, the library wanted to 
borrow the book to put on display with other artifacts". 
He said, "I wouldn't let them have it for fear of getting 
lost". 

"Now", he said to me, "you are at liberty to peruse 
that book at your liesure and I'm sure you'll find all the 
information in there that you're after." "I know you will 
want to make some notes so I'll get you a writing pad and 
pencil." 

As he handed me the writing pad he said, "I see your 
wife sitting outside in the car. I'm going out and invite 
here in for a cup of tea because I'm sure you are going to 
be quite a while with that book." 

I spent the next several hours avidly perusing the 
book and making copious notes. It turned out to be a 
veritable gold-mine of information on the subject. It 
told of the circumstances surround her initiation. It 
contained a copy of an affidavit, signed by the Wor. 
Master and the two Wardens, verifying the authenticity 
of her initiation. It went on to tell about her getting 
a second degree but nowhere in the book was any reference 
made to a third degree. 

A portion of the book was devoted to her memoirs. In 
them she tells all about how she came to be initiated into 
the Lodge. She also tells about getting her second degree; 
but, nowhere in her memoirs is any mention of a third 
degree. 

Near the back of the book it says that there is a 
bronze memorial in her honour hanging in the Cathedral in 
the city of Cork. It was donated by the Freemasons of 
the area. The back page of the book is devoted to a 
copy of the inscription of that memorial. I copied it 
down word for word. At least my wife wrote it down as I 
dictated it. 



- 41 - 

Following is that inscription: 

IN PIOUS MEMORY OF 

THE HONOURABLE ELIZABETH ALDWORTH 

WIFE OF RICHARD ALDWORTH, ESQ. 

OF NEWMARKET COURT, COUNTY CORK 

DAUGHTER OF 

ARTHUR, FIRST VISCOUNT DONERAILLE 

OF THE SAME NEWMARKET COURT 

BORN 1695 - DIED 1775 

HER REMAINS LIE AT REST IN NEWMARKET CEMETERY 

INITIATED INTO FREEMASONRY IN LODGE NO. 44 

AT DONERAILLE COURT, SEPT. (13 OR 18) 1712 A.D, 



When I finished dictating the inscription, ray wife 
remarked: "What a coincidence; her Lodge number was the 
same as yours; No. 44." 

When I read it ray thoughts went back to the story in 
Brian McMahon's book that first aroused my interest and 
curiosity. I couldn't help but note the discrepancies 
in his story. He had two facts correct: 

(1) There was, and still is, a padlock on the cemetery 
gate. 

(2) She actually was buried in that cemetery. 

He said her name was 'Mary Barry'. Where in the world 
he conjured up that name is anybody's guess. It sure 
succeeded in throwing me off the trail. 

He said she had married the First Viscount Doneraille. 
She was his daughter, not his wife. 

He said he had to "scramble over the fence to visit 
her grave". I defy anyone to find anybody's grave in that 
cemetery unless he knew exactly where it was. 

He said she was the only woman Freemason in the world. 
She may have been the first but we know there were others. 
Evidently you can't convince the Irish. Note the title 
of the book: "The Lady Freemason." 

The book states that she was buried with full Masonic 
honours. What is purported to be the complete Euology 
given at her funeral is printed in the book. It was a 
fairly lengthy eulogy. I didn't have time to copy it all 
down but I did make note of five excerpts from it. 

(1) "Having lived to the grand old age of four score 
years, Lady Aldworth was finally called, by the 



- 42 - 

Great Architect, to that other temple not made 
by human hands." 

(2) "Her entire life was dedicated to the highest 
principles and traditions of Freemasonry." 

(3) "She attended Lodge regularly and on occasion 
paid visits to other Lodges in the District." 

(4) "Being a lady of considerable means, and 
influential position, and having a charitable 
disposition, many a brother Freemason, who 
found himself in circumstances of distress, was 
indebted to the generosity of her helping hand. " 

(5) "She founded a benevolent fund to assist the 
widows and children of departed Freemasons." 

The book contained a number of coloured pictures. 
The frontispiece was a picture of her portrait. It said 
copies of her portrait were in great demand by Lodges in 
Ireland. The original is preserved in the First Lodge 
in the city of Cork, along with other memorabilia such 
as: the chair in which she was initiated; the jewel 
that she wore in Lodge; and her Lodge Regalia, including 
an apron made especially for her from the skin of a lamb, 
raised on her father's estate, measuring 26" x 28". 

I was very interested in one sentence that stated 
that one copy of her portrait was especially dedicated 
by the Grand Lodge of Ireland in 1855 and presented to 
W.M. Wilson, the first Grand Master of Canada. 

I didn't have time to make any notes from her memoirs. 
I do remember what she had to say about how she came to 
be initiated into the Lodge. 

We should keep in mind that she was only a teenage 
girl at the time. The fact the Lodge room was located 
in her home made access to it very convenient for her. 

She said out of sheer curiosity she wanted to find 
out what Freemasons did that was different from ordinary 
working Masons. 

Before the Lodge members assembled for this particular 
meeting, she sneaked into the Lodge room and had in a 
corner behind a piece of furniture. She didn't say what 
kind of furniture; whether it was a chair, a desk, a 
cupboard, or even a grandfather's clock. She just said, 
a piece of furniture." 

When she was discovered, (again, she didn't tell how 
she came to be discovered) her father, who was one of the 
Lodge members, took her into an adjoining room. After 
severely reprimanding her for her indiscretion, he told 
her to wait in that room while the members decided what 
they should do about her. 



- 43 - 

She said she sat in that room a long, long time, 
shivering in her shoes, waiting for her father to return. 
When he finally returned, he told her the Lodge members 
had reached a decision: "That because of what she had 
already observed, she should be initiated into the Lodge." 
"But only on condition that she willingly give her consent 
to be initiated." She said, "He didn't tell me what the 
alternative might be so I gave my consent" . 

She goes on to describe how she was prepared to be 
initiated. Judging from her description, it wasn't too 
different from the way in which we prepare our candidates 
today. 

When she tells about getting her second degree, she 
said she wasn't blindfolded, but the lights were all out 
and the Lodge room was in darkness. This makes me wonder 
if their second degree wasn't a combination of our second 
and third degrees. 

This, my brethren, I am convinced must be the true 
version of the story of Elizabeth St. Leger. 

I thanked Mr. McCarthy for allowing me the privilege 
of perusing that book and for giving me the opportunity 
to make notes from it. 

When we were leaving, I shook hands with Mr. McCarthy 
and he said to me: "Mr. Vogan, I am happy to have met 
you; I am sorry to see you part; I would be most happy if 
we could meet again." 

When we were driving Michael home, he confided to me: 
"I have known Charlie McCarthy for over 50 years but I 
never knew before he had a book like that. " Then it 
dawned on me the possible reason for the hesitation at 
first. He probably had some doubt as to whether or not to 
reveal the existence of that book in the presence of Michael 
O'Calahan. I sincerely hope that he has had no reason 
since to regret his decision. 

Brethren, I leave you with one question. It is one 
on which I oft times reflect in retrospect. 

Was it sheer coincidence that Michael O'Calahan just 
happened to be standing in the doorway of his cottage at 
that particular moment, that we were driving up that 
particular street, on that particular day in October 1980? 
Or was there some unseen power directing the course of 
events that ultimately led me to the source of information 
that I have just revealed? 



- 44 - 



THANK THE SPEAKER 

R.W.Bro. David Bradley, on behalf of the Worshipful 
Master, the Members and Visitors of the Lodge thanked V.W. 
Bro. Vogan for an interesting and informative paper. Many 
dates and important events were woven together to produce 
the fine fabric of history for the enlightenment of the 
Brethren. He was particularly appreciative of the 
personal experience in Ireland and concluded with a simple, 
sincere, warm and heartfelt thank you which was heartily 
supported by the applause of the brethren. 

This portion of the program was concluded by a special 
thanks to the reviewers from R.W.Bro. Bruce. 

MOTION RE: V.W. BRO. G. H. VOGAN 

It was regularly moved by R.W.Bro. Pos seconded' by 
R.W.Bro. Drew, that Brother Vogan be given an Honorary 
Subscription to The Heritage Lodge Proceedings for 1982-83. 
Motion carried. 

Following the announcement from the Senior Warden, 
that the next meeting of the General Purpose Committee 
would be held in the Preston-Hespeler Masonic Temple on 
Wednesday evening October 20, 1982, at 7:30 p.m. and an 
invitation by the Worshipful Master for a short refresh- 
ment period in the banquet hall, the Lodge was closed 
in harmony at 11:20 p.m. 



COMING EVENTS 

OCTOBER 20, 1982 (Wednesday) - General Purpose Committee 
Meeting of The Heritage Lodge will be held in the 
Preston-Hespeler Masonic Temple, Cambridge, commencing 
at 7:30 p.m. sharp. Chairmen of the various Lodge 
Committees are expected to present their Annual Written 
Reports in accordance with the Lodge By-Laws, ARTICLE 
VIII, Section II. 

NOVEMBER 17, 1982 (Wednesday) - Twenty-Fifth Regular 
Meeting of The Heritage Lodge will be held in the 
Preston-Hespeler Masonic Temple, Cambridge, commencing 
at 7:30 p.m. The Installation and Investiture 
Ceremonies will be under the direction of M.W.Bro. 
N.R. Richards, who has invited the following Brethren 
to assist him: 

INSTALLING OFFICERS 



Installing Master 


- M.W.Bro. 


R. 


Richards 


Immediate Past Master 


- M.W.Bro. 


W. 


Bailey 


Senior Warden 


- R.W.Bro. 


A. 


Newell 


Junior Warden 


- R.W.Bro. 


N. 


Strutt 


Chaplain 


- R.W.Bro. 


A. 


Bjerkness 


Senior Deacon 


- R.W.Bro. 


D. 


Emerick 



- 45 - 



Junior Deacon 


- Wor.Bro. 


R. Macintosh 


Director of Ceremonies 


- R.W.Bro. 


R. Green 


Asst. Director of Ceremonies 


- V.W.Bro. 


L. Ferguson 


Secretary 


- R.W.Bro. 


R. Groshaw 


Treasurer 


- R.W.Bro. 


A Littlejohn 


Inner Guard 


- R.W.Bro. 


E. Wilson 


Tyler 


- R.W.Bro. 


C. Grimwood 


Organist 


- R.W.Bro. 


L. Hertel 



a large number of additional distinguished Masons will be 
participating in other parts of the ceremonies and a 
large number of members and visitors are expected to show 
their support for the new Officers. 

Also on this occasion, and of special significance to 
The Heritage Lodge, we shall be receiving R.W.Bro. Rev. 
W. Gray Rivers, District Deputy Grand Master, Waterloo 
District, on his Official Visit. R.W.Bro. Rivers is a 
Charter Member of the Lodge, and the first Chaplain, an 
office he has served with reverence and distinction until 
his resignation to allow him full time for his new and 
demanding duties. 

OTHER MEETINGS - Plans are underway for the Regular Meetings 
in March and May, 1983. M.W.Bro. Eric W. Nancekivell, 
will be presenting a paper at our Regular Meeting in 
March; the place and date have yet to be decided. 

FUTURE TOPICS 

R.W.Bro. Wallace McLeod and R.W.Bro. Balfour LeGresley 
have prepared a list of 50 possible topics for future 
paper presentations. A number will be listed in these 
Proceedings from time to time to stimulate interest and 
encourage independent research. The topics have been 
selected at random and are by no means exclusive. If you 
have further suggestions please communicate them to the 
Editor of these Proceedings. 

Also, if you are interested in preparing a paper for 
presentation in lodge on any of the topics listed or one 
of your own choosing, please express your interest to 
R.W.Bro. Frank Bruce or the Editor. 

In some cases, early research has been initiated by 
the body referenced after the listed topic. For example, 
numbered papers of the Canadian Masonic Research Association 
are shown as: (PCMRA #XX) 

1. William Jarvis (PCMRA #57) 

2. John Butler (PCMRA #76) 

3. Simon McGillivray (PCMRA #83) , Wallace McLeod has 
started to research this person. 

4. Joseph Brant - Mohawk Indian (PCMRA #15), Jack Pos 
is preparing a paper. 



- 46 - 

5. The clandestine, Grand Lodge of Ontario , 1876-1896. 
Nothing is known to have been written seriously 

on this topic. 

6. The Provincial Grand Lodge of Niagara. Lawrence 
Runnalls is currently researching this topic 
which is certain to include interesting biographies 
of THE KERRS and that 'eminence grise' CHRISTOPHER 
DANBY . 

7. The life of any (deceased) Past Grand Master. A 
beginning can be made from the book of Past 
Grand Masters by Lawrence Runnalls, then using 
the Grand Lodge Proceedings review the masonic 
career during his grand lodge years. Wallace 
McLeod suggested the following names in particular: 
Sir J.M. Gibson; J.R. Robertson; James Moffat; 
James Kerr; Daniel Spry; Henry Robertson; E.T. 
Malone; Daniel F. Macwatt; W.D. McPherson; F.W. 
Harcourt; W.N. Ponton; W.J. Drope; J.S. Martin 
(Jack Pos has started on him) . 

8. How about old Lodges in places like Brockville, 
Hamilton, Grimsby, Belleville-Napanee, Cobourg 
and Ingersoll as places with active lodges formed 
in 1810 or earlier. 

9. The Sir John A. MacDonald masonic papers in the 
Public Archives of Canada (about 100 letters) . 

10. The Honorary Past Grand Masters of Ontario. 

11. The William Mercer Wilson Medalists. 

12. Square and compasses as symbols used by non- 
masonic organizations. 

Look to future issues for more suggestions. 

FROM THE SECRETARY'S DESK 

BOUND VOLUME OF LODGE PROCEEDINGS - 

1. As most of you are aware, the first five years of the 
Lodge Proceedings have been beautifully bound by a 
professional book binder at a cost of $25.00. These 
have all ben spoken for and the following have yet to 
claim their copies: Wm. Boratynec, Wm. Bolton, G.D. 
Cameron, A.J. Cohoe, W.A. Dempsey, R.F. Gordon, D. Grin ton, 
P.R. Harrison, Allan Hogg, W.E. McLeod, and R.J. Varley. 

A second list is growing of masons who failed to get their 
names in in time and are anxiously hoping that some of 
the above will not clain their copy. 

Also, the book binder is still prepared to bind your 
personal copies of the Lodge Proceedings at a cost of 
$15.00 payable to the Lodge Secretary. Gather up all your 
back issues and bring them along to the next Regular Meeting 
or ship them to the Lodge Secretary along with your payment. 

2. LODGE DUES - A number of Masons appear to be unaware 
of the serious consequences of being suspended from the 
Lodge for non-payment of lodge dues. Please note that 
The Heritage Lodge No. 730 has been duly Constituted as 



- 47 - 

a Regular Masonic Lodge and that suspension from this 
lodge for N.P.D. automatically results in suspension 
in all lodges (Section 210, Constitution of Grand Lodge), 
and the member so suspended is deprived of all his Masonic 
rights and privileges (Section 207, Constitution G.L.). 
Therefore, do not neglect this important duty if you 
value Freemasonry. 

3. NEW ADDRESSES - The following names and addresses 
should be added to your Lodge Mailing List. 



404. Norman H. Bell, PGS 
R.R. #2 

Cargill, Ont. , N)G 1J0 
Moravian No. 431 
Bruce (421) 



410. Geo. F.W. Inrig, PGR 
81 Wellington St. 
Lindsay, Ont. K9V 3N8 
Faithful Brethren #77 
Victoria (427) 



405. Arthur G. Blanchard, PM 
25 Mary St. , 
Perth, Ont. , K7H 2X1 
True Britons No. 14 
St. Lawrence (422) 



411. Eric H. Lakien, MM 

#1510-120 Shelbourne Ave 
Toronto, Ont. M6B 2M7 
Pallestine #559 
Toronto 7 (428) 



406. John W.D. Broughton, MM 
Box 1018 

Brighton, Ont., K0K 1H0 
United #29 
Prince Edward (423) 



412. Heinrich R. Schaefer,MM 
2177 Long Lake Rd. 
Sudbury, Ont. P3E 5H2 
Sudbury #658 
Sudbury-Manitoulin (429) 



407. Robert G. Chappell, PM 
20 Hummel Ave. , 
Kearns, Ont., P0K 1J0 
Doric #623 
Temiskaming (424) 



413. Roger B. Stroud, MM 

Suite 609, 70 King St.E, 

Oshawa, Ont. 

Parkwood #695 

Ontario (430) 



408. Paul A. Curry, PDDGM 
R.R. #2 

Erin, Ont. , NOB 1T0 
Coronation #677 
Toronto 2 (425) 



414. Norman J. Souter, PM 
23 Pettit Dr. 
Weston, Ont. M9R 2W6 
Sunnylea #664 
Toronto 2 (431) 



409. Elmer R. Davies, PM 
2 Cochrane Dr. 
Toronto, Ont., M8Z 3Z2 
Georgina #343 
Toronto 3 (426) 



415. Herbert B. Tink, MM 
R.R. #1 

Hampton, Ont. LOB 1J0 
Jerusalem #31 
Ontario (432) 



Please notify the Secretary as soon 
change in address and masonic rank, or 



as possible of any 
other corrections. 



- 48 - 

The following list of District Representatives for 
the H.O.M.E. Project are included to acquaint the members 
of The Heritage Lodge and the readers of these proceed- 
ings with hose Masons who have volunteered their services 
to assist in obtaining the necessary funds for the Lodge 
Room Restoration Project. We are indeed grateful for 
their willingness to serve Freemasonry in this important 
endeavour. 

HONORARY CHAIRMAN 

M. W. Bro. Howard 0. Polk, Grand Master 

TASK FORCE COMMITTEE 

R. W. Bro. C. Edwin Drew Chairman; Ed Ralph, Gord Brittain, 
James Major, Paul Curry, Bert Wiggins and Alan Hogg 

DISTRICT REPRESENTATIVES 



ALGOMA 

George A. Pape 
512 East Mary St. 
Thunder Bay, P7E 4K3 

ALGOMA EAST 
Lloyd Shier 
581 Placid Ave. 
Sault St. Marie, P6B 3M4 

BRANT 

Donald Grin ton 
28 Cambridge Dr. 
Brantford, N3R 5E2 

BRUCE 

Roy Weatherdon 

Box 623, 968 Bricker St. 

Port Elgin, NOH 2C0 

CHATHAM 

Hilary Mavin, 
1 English Rd. , 
Chatham, N7M 4H6 

EASTERN 

Arthur Youngs 
1703 Princess T. 
Cornwall, K6J 1T3 



GEORGIAN 

Laurie Brandridge 
Box 26, 190 Centre St 
Beeton, LOG 1A0 

GREY 

William Strutt 
955 9th Ave. W. 
Owen Sound, N4K 4N8 

HAMILTON A 

James Rob son 

110 High Park Ave. 

Hamilton, L8P 4M7 

HAMILTON B 

Clark Brooks 
13 Hunter Rd. 
Grimsby, L3M 4A3 

HAMILTON C 

Laverne Dawdy 
38 Kenmore Rd. 
Hamilton, L8S 3T7 

LONDON EAST 
Norman Camp 
602 Baseline Rd. E. 
London, N6C 3L9 



FRONTENAC 

Bruce Todd 

739 Laidlaw Cres. 

Kingston, K7M 5M3 



LONDON WEST 

MacKenzie Tilden 
180 Mary Ave. 
London, N6J 2RI 



- 49 



MUSK. PARRY S. 
Eugene Gerhart 
Box 482, 11 Brenda Ave 
Parry Sound, P2A 2X5 

NIAGARA A 

Stewart Greavette 

12 Creemore Ct. 

St. Catharines L2M 6H1 



SARNIA 

Donald Emerick 
506 George St. 
Sarnia, N7T 4P9 

ST. THOMAS 

Robert Jackson 
68 Balaclava St. 
St. Thomas, N5P 3C6 



NIAGARA B 

William Lowe 

6151 Culp St. 

Niagara Falls, L2G 2B6 

NIPPISSING E. 
Robert Smith 
111 Tweedsmuir Dr. 
North Bay, P1A 3T9 

NORTH HURON 

James DeZeeuw 

P.O. Box 64, Elora St. 

Teeswater, NOG 2S0 

ONTARIO 

Reginald Jewell 
58 Bayview Cres. 
Cobourg, K9A 4C6 

OTTAWA 1 

John Hogg 

201 - 1500 Merivale Rd 

Nepean, K2E 6Z5 

OTTAWA 2 

Sidney Harbert 
R.R. #7 
Pembroke, K8A 6W8 



SOUTH HURON 
Bert Mennie 
281 Water St. 
Stratford, N5A 3C8 

SUDBURY-MANIT. 
Terry Thorn 

Box 771, 340 Avery Rd 
Espanola, POP 1C0 

TEMISKAMING 

R.B. Johnson 
Box 1180 
Cochrane, POL 1C0 

TORONTO 1 

Frank Dunn 

2134 Greenhurst Ave. 

Mississauga, L4X 1J6 

TORONTO 2 

John Boersma 

39 Richview R. #710 

Islington, M9A 4M7 

TORONTO 3 

Elmer Davies 
2 Cochrane Dr. 
Toronto, M8Z 3Z2 



PETERBOROUGH 

James Hutchinson 
866 Cochrane Cres. 
Peterborough, K9H 5N3 

PRINCE EDWARD 

William Dempsey 
Box 181 
3elleville, K8W 5A2 



TORONTO 4 

Alex Cowie 

15 Minos Cres. 

Scarborough, Ml J 3P8 

TORONTO 5 

Charles Tugwell 
R.R. #3 
Newmarket, L8Y 4W1 



ST. LAWRENCE 

Donald Moore, 

R.R. #3, Heathers Point 

Brockville, K6V 5T3 



TORONTO 6 

Kenneth McLellan 

71 Thorncliffe Pk. Dr. 

#404, Toronto, M4H 1L3 



- 50 - 



TORONTO 7 

John MacKenzie 
34 Brookland Dr. 
Bramalea, L6T 2M5 



WESTERN 

James D. Jackson 
1279 Heenan Place 
Kenora, P9N 2Y9 



VICTORIA 

George Inrig 

81 Wellington St 

Lindsay, K9V 3N8 



WILSON 

Stewart L. Thurtell 
329 Oxford St. 
Ingersoll, N5C 2W4 



WATERLOO 

Donald Kaufman 

441 Franklin St. N. 

Kitchener, N2A 1Z2 



WINDSOR 

James Napier 

1795 Gladstone Ave, 

Windsor, N8W 2N4 



WELLINGTON 

John Hunter 

122 Yorkshire St. N 

Guelph, N1H 5B4 



51 



MOONLIGHT 



I always am enchanted by 

The moonbeam's magic light 

That lends a soft and gentle touch 

To the mystery of night. 

The moon bathes gardens in a glow 
And with its silv'ry ray 
It soothes the weary mind and heart 
From troubles of the day. 

It helps the travel 'r on the road 
By lighting up the skies 
And brings a certain gleam to shine 
Within a lover's eyes. 

I'm glad that when God made the world 

And gave us night and day 

He also chose the silver moon 

To light and cheer our way. 



Carice Williams 
(Temple Topics, 
Feb. 1980) 



- 52 



GRAND LODGE OFFICERS (1982 - 1983) 

THE MOST WORSHIPFUL THE GRAND MASTER 

M.W.Bro. Howard 0. Polk 

892 Aaron Ave., Ottawa, K2A 3P3 

THE DEPUTY GRAND MASTER 
R.W.Bro. Ronald E. Groshaw 
31 Princess Margaret Blvd., Islington, M9A 1Z5 

THE GRAND SECRETARY 
M.W.Bro. Robt. E. Davies 
Drawer 217, Hamilton, L8N 3C9 

DISTRICT DEPUTY GRAND MASTER, WATERLOO DISTRICT 

R.W.Bro. W. Gray Rivers 

8 Kir by Ave., Dundas, L9H 5K9 



LODGE OFFICERS (1981 - 1982) 

George E. Zwicker 
Ronald E. Groshaw 
Balfour LeGresley 
David C. Bradley 
C. Edwin Drew 
Robert S. Throop 
Albert A. Barker 
Edsel C. Steen 
G. Robert Jackson 
Charles F. Grimwood 
Jacob (Jack) Pos 
Edward V. Ralph 
Gary J. Powell 
Donald S. Grinton 
Rev. W. Gray Rivers 
Len R. Hertel 
Henry G. Edgar 
Glen T. Jones 

CHAIRMEN, LODGE COMMITTEES (1981 - 1982) 

GENERAL PURPOSE - R.W.Bro. Balfour LeGresley, (SW) 

MEMBERSHIP & UNATTACHED MASONS - R.W.Bro. E.V. Ralph 

REFRESHMENT & ENTERTAINMENT - R.W.Bro. E.C. Steen, (SS) 

RECEPTION - R.W.Bro. Donald S. Grinton, (DC) 

MASONIC INFORMATION - R.W.Bro. Frank J. Bruce 

CENTRAL DATA BANK - W.Bro. F. James M. Major 

MASONIC MUSEUM - R.W.Bro. Jack Pos 

LODGE LIBRARY - R.W.Bro. Rev. W. Gray Rivers 

FINANCE & BY-LAWS - R.W.Bro. W. Ed. Wilson 

LODGE PUBLICATIONS - R.W.Bro. Cliff Baxter 



Worshipful Mast 


er 




W . Bro 


Immediate Past 


Master 


R 


W.Bro 


Senior Warden 




R 


W.Bro 


Junior Warden 




R 


.W.Bro 


Senior Deacon 




R 


. W . Bro 


Junior Deacon 




R 


.W.Bro 


Inner Guard 






W.Bro 


Senior Steward 




R 


.W.Bro 


Junior Steward 




R 


.W.Bro 


Tyler 




R 


.W.Bro 


Secretary 




R 


.W.Bro 


Assistant Secre 


tary 


R 


.W.Bro 


Treasurer 




R 


.W.Bro 


Director of Ceremonie 


sR 


.W.Bro 


Chaplain 




R 


.W.Bro 


Organist 




R 


.W.Bro 


Historian 




R 


.W.Bro 


Archivist 






W.Bro 



NOTE: Where the Lodge Office appears in brackets after 
the Chairman's name, this is an automatic appoint- 
ment as defined in the Lodge By-Laws. The duties 
of all Lodge Committees are defined in Article 
VIII, Sections 1 to 11. 



Wht ^erttase Xobge £o -730 



INSTITUTED 

Sept. 21, 1977 
WORSHIPFUL MASTER 
R.W.Bro. B. LeGresley 
213 Riverside Dr. , 
Toronto, Ontario, 
M6S 4A8 




CONSTITUTED 

Sept. 23, 1978 
SECY & EDITOR 

R.W.Bro. J. Pos 

10 Mayfield Ave. 

Guelph, Ontario, 

NIG 2L8 



Res. (M6) 769 380^ 




Res. 
Bus. 


(519) 821 4995 
(519) 824 4120 


Vol.6, No. 2 Cambridge, 


Ontario, 


Canada 


Nov. 1982 



Please Note: 

The opinions expressed by the authors, reviewers 
and other participants in the papers and discussions in- 
cluded in these Proceedings are not necessarily those of 
The Heritage Lodge. 

* * * 

SUMMONS 



Dear Sirs and Brethren: 

By order of the Worshipful Master, R.W.Bro. Balfour 
LeGresley, you are hereby summoned to attend the Twenty- 
Sixth Regular Meeting of The Heritage Lodge N0.730, G.R.C., 
to be held in the Masonic Temple, 888 Yonge Street, Toron- 
to, Ontario, on:- 

WEDNESDAY EVENING, MARCH 2nd, 19 83, at 7:00 p.m. 

prompt for the purpose of introducing and transacting such 
business as may be regularly brought before the Lodge. 

On this occasion we will be priviledged to have 
M.W.Bro. Eric W. Nancekivell, P.G.M., as our Guest Speaker, 
who will present a paper on "Communications and Recognition 
among Grand Lodges". M.W.Bro. Nancekivell is Chairman of 
the Committee on the Commission of Information and Recog- 
nition for the Conference of Grand Masters in North America, 

Our host for this meeting will be R.W.Bro. Paul G. 
Egan, D.D.G.M. for Toronto District 7. We are also grateful 
to Ionic Lodge No. 25, for giving up their use of the 
Lodge Room for this important meeting. 



- 2 - 

Favourable reports having been received on the 
applications for affiliation from the following Brethren, 
the Worshipful Master has declared that the customary 
ballot will be taken at this meeting; 

1. William John Crilly, D.D.G.M.; 60 Clipper Rd. Apt. 913, 
Willowdale; Age 57 i Sales Representative; recommended by 
W.Bro. E. Buscombe and W.Bro. John Boersma. 

2. Ralph Green, P.G.R.; 6646 Walkers Line, R.R. #2, Milton; 
Age 5^» Vice President Engineering; recommended by 

R. W.Bro. N.R. Strutt and R. W.Bro. A.N. Newell. 

3. Jack Hughes, P.D.D.G.M.; Kirkfield; Age 74; Retired; 
recommended by Bro. J.H. Eagleson and R. W.Bro. James 
Hutchinson. 

4. Allan Thomas James Wickins, P.D.D.G.M.; 252 Clarke Dr., 
Peterborough; Age 50; Draftsman; recommended by R. W.Bro. 
James Hutchinson and R. W.Bro. John Auckland. 

5. Edward Michael Elchyshyn, P.M.; 26 Kelly St. Box 884, 
Capreal; Age 46; Buyer; recommended by V. W.Bro. F.S. 
Foote and Bro. J.C. Clark. 

6. Douglas M. Gow, P.M.; 2050 Family Cresc, Mississauga; 
Age 6l ; Business Owner; recommended by Bro. Norman 
Souter and W.Bro. John Boersma. 

7. Robert John Macaulay, P.M.; R.R. #2, Mount Pleasant Rd. , 
Brantford; Age 6l ; Retired Dispatcher; recommended by 

V. W.Bro. Clyde Bowman and W.Bro. Albert Barker. 

8. Charles Wellington Shaw, P.M.; BOX 123, Maple; Age 59; 
Research Chemist; recommended by M. W.Bro. W.K. Bailey 
and R. W.Bro. Balfour LeGresley. 

9. Allan Wm. White, W.M. ; 6l Need St., Bobcaygeon; Age 51; 
Labour Management Advisor; recommended by R. W.Bro. G.F. 
Inrig and R. W.Bro. Balfour LeGresley. 

10. Morley Bowman Allen, M.M. ; 6 Panter Circle, Belleville; 
Age 50 ; Salesman; recommended by W.Bro. Robert D. Jones 
and R. W.Bro. Robert S. Throop. 

11. Douglas Alfred Dale, M.M. ; 325 Willingdon Ave., Kingston; 
Age 53; Labour Foreman; recommended by W.Bro. Peter M. 
Floyd and Bro. Bruce H. Todd. 

12. Ross Melville MacDonald, M.M. ; Box 119i Consecon; Age 
54; Marine Pilot; recommended by W.Bro. John M. Jinks 
and R. W.Bro. Robert S. Throop. 

13. Walter J. Mayhew, M.M. ; 105 Pine Str. , Belleville; 

Age 38; Manager Moving Co.; recommended by W.Bro. Robt. 
D. Jones and R. W.Bro. Robert S. Throop. 



- 3 - 

lk. Harvey Menzies, M.M. ; 217 Lansdown St., Sudbury; Age 
52; Technician; recommended by R.W.Bro. Walter E. 
Schaeffer and W.Bro. George Chambers. 

15- Eric R. Mueller, M.M. ; R.R. #1, Freelton; Age k? ; 

Electrical Contractor; recommended by W.Bro. David S. 
Amis and V.W.Bro. Laverne Dawdy. 

16. Edward Charles Parker, M.M. ; 293 Herchimer Ave., Belle- 
ville; Age ^9; Work Study Analyst; recommended by W.Bro. 
Robert D. Jones and W.Bro. Allan Dempsey. 

17. Douglas R. Parkinson, M.M. ; 334 Herchimer Ave., Belle- 
ville; Age 57 ! Electrician; recommended by W.Bro. Robt. 
D. Jones and W.Bro. Allan Dempsey. 

18. William Herbert Rea ? M.M. ; 50 Vansitmart Ave., Hamilton; 
Age 32; Vacuum Repairman; recommended by W.Bro. David 

S. Amis and V.W.Bro. Alfred E. Harrington. 

19. Stuart William Taylor, M.M. ; 1^39 Colonial Rd., Box 
119-5511 » Belleville; Age 53; Canadian Forces; recom- 
mended by W.Bro. R.D. Jones and R.W.Bro. R.S. Throop. 

At this meeting, a vote will be taken on the 'Notice 
of Motion 1 (see page ) re: Lodge By-Laws. The proposed new 
By-Laws are presented in their entirety on pages - of 
these Proceedings. Every Officer and Committee Chairman, as 
well as Lodge Members are asked to review this proposal 
carefully and be prepared to discuss their concerns at the 
next meeting of the General Purpose Committee on Feb. 16, 1983< 



GENERAL PURPOSE COMMITTEE 

I am also requested by R.W.Bro. David C. Bradley, 
Chairman of the Committee on General Purposes to announce 
that the next meeting of the Committee will be held in the 
Preston-Hespeler Masonic Temple on:- 

WEDNE SDAY EVENING, FEBRUARY 16th , I9 83, at 7 Q0 p.m. 

sharp for the purpose of transacting and discussing Lodge 
business. All Lodge Officers and Chairmen of Standing and 
Appointed Committees are urgently requested to attend; all 
other Members are particularly welcome. 

Sincerely and fraternally, 

R.W.Bro. J. Pos, Secretary 



TWENTY-FIFTH REGULAR MEETING 



The Twenty-Fifth Regular Meeting of The Heritage Lodge 
No. 730, G.R.C., was held in the Preston-Hespeler Masonic 
Temple, Cambridge, Wednesday, November 17, 1982, with 13 
Officers, 83 other Members and 74 Visitors for a total of 
170 Masons as per Lodge Register. 

OPEN THE LODGE 

The Lodge was opened in the First Degree at 7:38 p.m. 
by W.Bro. George E. Zwicker, W.M. who welcomed the Brethren 
and expressed his pleasure at seeing such a large group of 
masons present for the Sixth Installation and Investiture 
Ceremonies of The Heritage Lodge. 

CONFIRMING LODGE MINUTES 

It was regularly moved by W.Bro. G. Hall, seconded by 
R. W.Bro. E.S.P. Carson, that the minutes of the Twenty- 
Fourth Regular Meeting of the Lodge, held in the Preston- 
Hespeler Masonic Temple, Cambridge, September 15th, 1982, 
which were printed in the Lodge Proceedings, Vol. 6, No. 1, 
and distributed to all the members of the lodge, be accepted 
as circulated. Carried. 

CORRESPONDENCE 

Thirteen letters were received as follows: 

1. In mid September information was received from the three 
major masonic regalia firms, namely: 

Muir Cap and Regalia Limited 

Stokes Cap and Regalia Limited and, 

Dominion Regalia Limited 
all included current price lists which showed modest 
increases with an explanation that much of the increase, 
especially from foreign sources, is due to the dimin- 
ishing trading value of the Canadian Dollar. Lodge- 
room equipment has increased by as much as 10-12%; 
although some other prices remain unchanged from 1981. 

2. From Andre' A.G. Bassou, P.G.D.C., GLNF , dated September 
13, 1982 in response to our earlier letter of August 

16, 1982. Brother Bassou enclosed copies of his 
membership cards from a large number of Masonic Craft 
and Research Lodges. He is an active paid-up member 
of 27 Masonic Lodges and a Corresponding or Associate 
Member of another 21 Research or Historical Lodges. 
Bro. Bassou has paid the necessary fee for Corresponding 
Subscriber to our Proceedings. His postal address is 
Box 2 54, Agaba, Jordan. 



- 5 



3. From A.E. Rhodes, Secretary, Gait Lodge No. 257, G.R.C. 
dated September 26, 1982, enquiring about the avail- 
ability of the H.O.M.E. project slide set and taped 
commentary. 

4. From Donald L.A. Bastedo, Waterloo District Chairman of 
the Blood Donors Committee, announcing the fiscal year 
as extending from April to April and requesting the 
name and address of our Lodge Blood Donor Chairman. 

5. From Bro. Angelo Mior, member of The Heritage Lodge 
and now living in Yellowknife, N.W.T. , dated October 
5, 1982, enclosing payment for Lodge dues and request- 
ing a demit from the Lodge. 

6. From A.G.A. Kennedy, Secretary/Treasurer of the Worship- 
ful Masters, Past Masters and Wardens Association of 
Waterloo District, dated October 14, 1982, concerning 

a special travel project to cover expenses of our Grand 
Lodge Representative from this Jurisdiction to the 
Grand Lodge of Mexico. The anticipated cost is between 
$1500 and $2000. The association has passed a motion 
to pay $300 with the hope that the balance could be 
raised from the 17 lodges of Waterloo District. 

7. From R.W.Bro. W.E. Wilson, Charter Member of The Heri- 
tage Lodge, dated October 17, 1982, concerning the 
Lodge By-Laws and requesting an early meeting date to 
review the same. 

8. From R.W.Bro. Ernest Delvin, Secretary, Lodge Renais- 
sance No. 119, G.R.Q., dated October 17, 1982, advising 
that they had not received the material from our 
Lodge which they had ordered and paid for in July 
1982. (A phone call to the Office of our Grand 
Secretary, revealed that the parcel left their office 
in Hamilton on July 29, 1982.) 

9. From Russell J. Varley, member of The Heritage Lodge, 
dated October 24, 1982, enclosing payment for Lodge 
dues and a bound volume of the Lodge Proceedings with 
a special request that his name be placed on a list 

to receive a copy of the published papers of the Cana- 
dian Masonic Research Association, should the Lodge 
decide to proceed with the project. 

10. From Wm. G. Pettigrew, Preston Lodge No. 297, dated 

October 27, 1982, requesting 200 copies of the 'H.O.M.E, 
PROJECT BROCHURES' to be mailed to individual members 
of their Lodge with the next lodge summons. (Bro. 
Pettigrew was advised that W.Bro. Donald Kaufman was 
the District Representative in Waterloo District for 
the H.O.M.E. PROJECT and was given sufficient copies to 
supply to the Lodge Secretaries so that every mason in 
Waterloo District would receive a copy.) 



- 6 



11. From W.Bro. F. James M. Major, member of The Heritage 
Lodge, dated October 28, 1982, requesting that infor- 
mation be sent to R. W.Bro. Robert G. Loftus re: Life 
Membership and a bound volume of the Lodge Proceedings. 

12. From R. W.Bro. J. Lawrence Runnalls, dated October 30, 
1982, with reference to the Lodge proposal to publish 
the papers of the Canadian Masonic Research Association. 
Bro. Runnalls also sends a complete list of the titles 
and authors of some 48 papers with Ontario interest. 

He also mentions that of the 116 papers presented, 9 
were not published and those unpublished manuscripts 
are not available. Bro. Runnalls has one of the few 
complete sets (107 papers) which comprises 9 bound 
volumes all of which takes up 8 inches of shelf space. 
Obviously one volume could not possibly hold the 
complete set. His selection of 48 papers could be 
printed in two volumes. He suggests that R. W.Bro. 
Charles Sankey and W.Bro. Stewart Greavette could examine 
his papers and make a recommendation. 

13. From R. W.Bro. Ernest Delvin, Secretary of Lodge 
Renaissance No. 119, G.R.Q., dated October 31, 1982, 
indicating that their Grand Secretary had finally 
acknowledged receipt of the material we sent through 
the office of our Grand Secretary last July, and that 
the material was first sent to the Grand Master, M.W. 
Bro. Martin; and that it has subsequently passed through 
the hands of all Grand Lodge Committees in Quebec such 
as Jurisprudence, Historian, Masonic Foundation, 
Committee of General Purposes, etc., etc., etc. and as 
of the above date, in spite of the fact that $4 0.00 was 
paid to The Heritage Lodge for payment in good faith, 
they have yet to redeive a single word or page of our 
material. (In view of these trying circumstances, 

your Secretary has sent as many of the back issues of 
our Lodge Proceedings that were still available, along 
with a copy of our revised By-Laws and sent them 
direct to R. W.Bro. Delvin with our best wishes for 
their new venture and our sympathy for their unfortun- 
ate circumstances. This material was received by Bro. 
Delvin and he immediately sent us a cheque in the 
amount of $15.00 and his fraternal gratitude to 
compensate for postage and handling. I recommend that 
we thank Bro. Delvin for his kind gesture and that the 
amount be returned to our Quebec Brethren as a token 
of our esteem and wishing them every success in the 
formation of the proposed bilingual Historical Lodge 
in the Province of Quebec) . 

The Worshipful Master declared the correspondence be 
processed and filed in accordance with Lodge practice. 



- 7 



RECEIVING D.D.G.M. 

At this time R.W.Bro. Roy Sparrow, acting as Director 
of Ceremonies, was admitted to present R.W.Bro. W. Gray 
Rivers, District Deputy Grand Master, Waterloo District. 
After receiving Grand Honors, R.W.Bro. Rivers was invited 
to assume the gavel; following which Bro. Rivers commented 
with sincerety and warmth of heart how thrilled he was to 
be present on this historic occasion that saw the 
Deputy Grand Master and three Past Grand Masters in atten- 
dance. He then returned to the gavel to the Worshipful 
Master. 

AT THE ALTAR 

The Worshipful Master called on R.W.Bro. Arthur Watson, 
acting as Lodge Chaplain, to attend the Altar: 



1-6: 



The lesson was read from Jeremiah Chapter 18, verses 



Tonight on this auspicious occasion we are met from 
far and near and we are inextricibly bound together 
in the events of life around us. We all wonder at 
times what we can do to draw the world together under 
the Great Architect of the Universe. 

Three magic words tell us what we can do. BUILD, WEAVE 
AND MOLD! 

The sights and sounds of building are all around us. 
As the physical structures rise so must the inner man 
be developed. For building must go beyond the physical 
if it is to accomplish its task. As Edwin Markham said 
in "Man-Making" : 

Why build these cities glorious 
If man unbuilded goes? 
In vain we build the world 
Unless the builder also grows. 

So we must build strong foundations of faith which will 
insure the continuing of the Great Architect in our midst 
for this is the Landmark of masonry. We should perhaps 
think of masonry as a flower. The symbolism, the ideals, 
the principles, the philosophy the ritual, are all the 
petals of the flower. But the heart of the flower - that 
which unites us into one beautiful perfect and complete 
whole - is friendship and brotherly love. 

But not only must we build, we must weave the tangled 
threads of life into a network of beauty. We can make the 
world shine by our example of weaving into life the threads 
of: temperance, fortitude, prudence and justice. 



But in the last analysis we must mold . We must improve 
the shape of life. We will make mistakes, but like the 
potter who makes and remakes the design we must keep on 
until we have molded the perfect life in God. We must mold 
our characters until we emulate the examples we talk about 
in Lodge. , 

So as we contemplate a new year ahead let us build, 
weave and mold our lives so that we may shine tomorrow as 
the light that will assist to bring the world to peace and 
unity. 

LET US PRAY 

Almighty God we thank thee for the challenge of the 
craft. Grant that in our lives we may so build, weave and 
mold that the glories that are ours may continue to enrich 
the world. May we become stronger and more dedicated 
citizens and at last see the dawning of a world brotherhood 
and peace. Enrich our lives and send us forth dedicated 
anew to they service. Bless the lives of those who rule 
the Craft within our Jurisdiction and give them grace for 
the tasks assigned that through them the blessings of 
masonry may abound through Him who liveth and reigneth 
world without end. Amen. 

SO MOTE IT BE. 

PASSING ACCOUNTS 

The following accounts amounting to $1,280.21, and 
covering the period from the last Regular Meeting dated 
September 15th, 1982, to November 17th, 1982, were presented 

Secretary's Account: 

Postage, Sept. Proceedings 

Mrs. Karen Perry, Fergus: 

Typing Sept. Proceedings, 50 pages @ $1.50 

Instant Print, Guelph: 

Printing 550 copies, Sept. Proceedings Inv. 
#30849 

Grand Lodge, to commute Life Memberships 

L.T. Richardson; W.H. Schaefer; F.S. Foote; 
E.S.P. Carson 

Secretary, Waterloo District: 
District Tax, 399 @ 75C 

Victoria and Grey Trust 
Safety deposit box #189 

Edsel Steene, Sr . Steward's Account: 
September refreshments 

TOTAL 



$ 


234. 


,32 




75. 


.00 




495. 


.57 




100. 


.00 




299. 


,25 




17, 


,50 




58. 


.57 


$1 


,280. 


,21 



- 9 - 



MOTION RE: ACCOUNTS 

It was regularly moved by R.W.Bro. James Hutchinson, 
seconded by R.W.Bro. Robert Throop, that the accounts be 
paid. Carried. 

RECEIVING PETITIONS 

Applications for membership by Affiliation were 
received from the following: 

1. CRILLY, William John, R.W.Bro.; 60 Clipper Road #913, 
Willowdale; Age 57; Sales Representative; member of 
High Park Lodge No. 531, G.R.C.; recommended by W.Bro. 
E Buscombe and W.Bro. John Boersma. 

2. GREEN, Ralph, P.G.R.; 6646 Walkers Line, R.R. #2, 
Milton; Age 54; Vice President Engineering; member of 
Grand River Lodge No. 151, G.R.C.; recommended by 
R.W.Bro. N.R. Strutt and R.W.Bro. A.N. Newell. 

3. HUGHES, Jack, P.D.D.G.M.; Kirkfield, Ontario; Age 74; 
Retired; member of Victoria Lodge No. 398, G.R.C.; 
recommended by Bro. J.H. Eagleson and R.W.Bro. James 
Hutchinson. 

4. WICKINS, Allan Thomas James, P.D.D.G.M.; 252 Clarke 
Drive, Peterborough; Age 50; Draftsman; member of 
Peterborough Lodge No. 155, G.R.C.; recommended by 
R.W.Bro. James Hutchinson and R.W.Bro. John Auckland. 

5. ELCHYSHYN, Edward Michael, P.M.; 26 Kelly St., Box 

8 84, Capreal; Age 46; Buyer; member of National Lodge 
No. 588, G.R.C.; recommended by V. W.Bro. F.S. Foote 
and Bro. J.C. Clark. 

6. GOW, Douglas M. P.M.; 2050 Family Cres., Mississauga; 
Age 61; Business Owner; member of Sunnylea Lodge No. 
664, G.R.C.; recommended by Bro. Norman Souter and 
W.Bro. John Boersma. 

7. MACAULAY, Robert John, P.M.; R.R. #2 Mount Pleasant 
Rd. , Brantford; Age 61; Retired Dispatcher; member of 
Scotland Lodge No. 193, G.R.C.; recommended by V.W. 
Bro. Clyde Bowman and W.Bro. Albert Barker. 

8. SHAW, Charles Wellington, P.M.; Box 123, Maple; Age 59; 
Research Chemist; member of Vaughan Lodge No. 54, 
G.R.C.; recommended by M. W.Bro. Wm. K. Bailey and 
R.W.Bro. Balfour LeGresley. 

9. WHITE, Allan Wm. , W.M. ; 61 Need St., Bobcaygeon; Age 51 
Labour Management Advisor; member of Verulam Lodge No. 
268, G.R.C.,; recommended by R.W.Bro. George F. Inrig 
and R.W.Bro. Balfour LeGresley. 



10 



10. ALLEN, Morley Bowman, M.M. ; 6 Panter Circle, Belleville, 
Age 50; Salesman; member of Belleville Lodge No. 123, 
G.R.C.; recommended by W.Bro. Robert D. Jones and R.W. 
Bro. Robert Throop. 

11. DALE, Douglas Alfred, M.M. ; 325 Willingdon Ave., King- 
ston; Age 53; Labour Foreman; member of Royal Edward 
Lodge No. 585, G.R.C.; recommended by W.Bro. Peter 

M. Floyd and Bro. Bruce H. Todd. 

12. MACDONALD, Ross Melville, M.M. ; Box 119, Consecon; Age 
54; Marine Pilot; member of Consecon Lodge No. 50, 
G.R.C.; recommended by W.Bro. John M. Jinks and W.Bro. 
Robert D. Jones. 

13. MAYHEW, Walter J., M.M. ; 105 Pine Street, Belleville, 
Age 38; Manager Moving Co.; member of Eureka Lodge No. 
283, G.R.C.; recommended by W.Bro. Robert D. Jones 
and R.W. Bro. Robert S. Throop. 

14. MENZIES, Harvey, M.M. ; 217 Lansdowne St., Sudbury; 
Age 52; Technician; member of Nickle Lodge No. 427, 
G.R.C.; recommended by R.W. Bro. W.E. Schaeffer and W. 
Bro. Geo. Chambers. 

15. MUELLER, Eric Rd., M.M.; R.R. #1, Freelton; Age 47; 
Electrical Contractor; member of Waterdown Lodge No. 
357, G.R.C.; recommended by W.Bro. David S. Amis and 
V. W.Bro. Laverne Dawdy. 

16. PARKER, Edward Charles, M.M. ; 293 Herchimer Ave., 
Belleville; Age 49; Work Study Analyst; member of 
Eureka Lodge No. 283, G.R.C.; recommended by W.Bro. 
Robert D. Jones and W.Bro. Allan Dempsey. 

17. PARKINSON, Douglas R. M.M. ; 334 Herchimer Ave., Belle- 
ville; Age 57; Electrician; member of Eureka Lodge No. 
283, G.R.C.; recommended by W.Bro. Robert D. Jones 
and W.Bro. Allan Dempsey. 

18. REA, William Herbert, M.M. ; 15 Vansitmart Ave., Hamil- 
ton; Age 32; Vacuum Repairman; member of Ionic Lodge 
No. 549, G.R.C.; recommended by W.Bro. David S. Amis 
and V. W.Bro. Alfred E. Harrington. 

19. TAYLOR, Stuart William, M.M. ; 1439 Colonial Road Group 
Box 119-5511, Belleville; Age 53; Canadian Forces; 
member of Eureka Lodge No. 283, G.R.C.; recommended 

by W.Bro. Robert D. Jones and R.W. Bro. Robt. S. Throop. 

The Worshipful Master declared the petitions received 
and instructed the Secretary to process the applications 
in the customary manner. 



- 11 



READING NAMES OF BRETHREN 12 MONTHS IN ARREARS 

The Secretary reported that there were 3 members more 
than 12 months in arrears of dues. Two have been contacted 
by telephone and have promised to make payment within the 
week, but the third member, W.Bro. Graeme R. Miller, King 
St. E. Bur ford, has had the telephone disconnected and his 
mail returned. 

SUSPENSION OF MEMBERS 

W.Bro. George E. Zwicker, Worshipful Master, therefore 
declared that W.Bro. Graeme R. Miller, whose last known 
address is King St. E. Burford, be suspended from The 
Heritage Lodge No. 730, G.R.C., for non-payment of dues, 
effective November 17, 1982. 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES 

1. COMMITTEE OF GENERAL PURPOSES - R. W.Bro. Balfour LeGres- 
ley, Chairman, reported that the Lodge Committee of General 
Purposes met on October 20, 1982, in the Preston-Hespeler 
Masonic Temple with only 6 members present. In the absence 
of a quorum no business could be conducted, but a number 
of items were discussed including: i) the preparation of 
a sample questionnaire to be sent to the membership for an 
inventory of our human resources; one of the members 
volunteered to draft a proposal for the next G.P. meeting, 
ii) similarly a draft proposal was also to be submitted 
at the next G.P. meeting, perhaps in the format of a folded 
pamphlet for aquisition of masonic artifacts, documents 
and other types of masonic memorabilia. iii) a suggestion 
that the Editor of the Lodge Proceedings might include a 
special question section including an introductory paragraph 
or abstract of the next paper to be presented so as to 
invite written questions and comments from the readers. 
Comments may also be edited for publication concerning 
published papers, iv) the major discussion centered around 
the re-drafting of the Lodge By-Laws. It was agreed that 
the By-Laws Committee, under the direction of R. W.Bro. 
W. Ed Wilson, Chairman, would meet on October 29, 1982, 
rewrite the By-Laws and submit the proposed changes to the 
Officers and Committee Chairmen prior to the Regular Meeting 
in November and that the Chairmen would arrange for notice 
of motion at that meeting for approval of the new By-Laws 
to be voted upon by the membership at the Regular Meeting 
in March, 1983. Copies of the proposed new By-Laws to be 
circulated to the membership with the November, 1982, 
Proceedings. The next meeting of the General Purpose Commit- 
tee is to be held in the Preston-Hespeler Masonic Temple, 
February 16, 1983, at 7:30 p.m. 



- 12 - 



2. REPORT OF THE AUDITORS - 

To: The Worshipful Master, Officers and Members of The 
Heritage Lodge 

Brethren: 

We have examined the books and records of The Heritage 
Lodge No. 730, G.R.C., for the year ended 31 August 1982. 
We have checked, where deemed necessary, the disbursements 
by examining the supporting warrants and bank withdrawals, 
the receipts by examining duplicate receipts and tracing 
them to bank deposits. 

The resulting statements are presented on the attach- 
ment to this letter. In our opinion, they present fairly 
the financial position of The Heritage Lodge No. 730, A.F. 
& A.M., at 31 August, 1982, and the results of its operations 
for the twelve month period then ended, on a basis consis- 
tant with that of the preceding year. 

We would recommend that one thousand dollars ($1,000) 
be taken from the Capital Fund of this Lodge, and with the 
matured Royal Mortgage Certificate #110113208 for five 
thousand dollars ($5,000) and the Government of Canada Bond 
for one thousand dollars ($1,000) for a total of seven 
thousand dollars (7,000) be invested in Guaranteed Invest- 
ment Certificates at the best available interest rate; or 
any other investment of equal or greater rate of return. 

Also, that four thousand dollars ($4,000) of the Life 
Membership Fund be invested similarly. 

Respectfully submitted, 
this 17th day of November, 
1982, 



K. G. Bartlett, Auditor 
N. E. Taylor, Auditor 



- 13 - 



STATEMENT OF RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 



FOR THE 


YEAR ENDED 


31 AUGUST, 1982 










OPERATING FUND 




RECEIPTS 




DISBURSEMENTS 






Annual dues 


$ 5,113.00 


G.L. Commutation 








Affiliation Fees 


820.00 


Fees 


$ 


575 


.00 


Life Membership Fee 


2,850.00 


Grand Lodge Dues 




988 


.50 


Historian Booklets 


59.50 


Refreshments 




73 


.97 


Bound Volumes (5 yr 


. 


Waterloo District 








Summonses) 


490.00 


Dues 




237, 


.25 


Bank Interest 


467.32 


Typing & Printing 


2 


,202 


.44 


Grand Lodge: 




Stationery and 








-Commutation Fees 


475.00 


Supplies 




359 


.92 


Miscellaneous 


361.25 


Postage 
Secretary's Honor- 




794, 


.19 






arium 




350, 


.00 






Allocations: 












Life Membership 


3, 


,300, 


.00 






Capital Fund 




795. 


.00 






Miscellaneous 


$10, 


941. 
,617, 


.00 




$10,636.07 


.27 






Uncashed cheque 




(12. 


.00) 








$10, 


,605. 


,27 


Bank Balance, 




Bank Balance 








81/09/01 


1,238.52 


82/08/31 


1, 


,269. 


.32 




$11,874.59 




$11, 


,874. 


,59 




LIFE MEMBERSHIP FUND 








RECEIPTS 




DISBURSEMENTS 






Fees 


$3,300.00 


Nil 


$ 






Bank Interest 


121.30 
$3,421.30 










Bank Balance 




Bank Balance 








81/09/01 


450.00 


82/08/31 


$3, 


,871. 


,30 




$3,871.30 




$3, 


,871. 


,30 



- 14 



CAPITAL FUND 



RECEIPTS 

Bank Interest 
Capital Investment 

Interest 
Affiliation Fees 
Miscellaneous 



Bank Balance 
81/09/01 



DISBURSEMENTS 



$ 306.80 Canada Trust Invest- 
ment: Certificate 



48.75 
795.00 



$1,150.55 

3,489.63 

$4,640.18 



#131-800211-7 



Bank Balance 
82/08/31 



$3,000.00 

$3,000.00 

1,640.18 

$4,640.18 



STATEMENT OF INVESTMENTS 



FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 AUGUST, 198 2 



INVESTMENTS 

Roy.Mor. Certificate 

#110113208 
Gov't, of Canada Bond 
Roy.Mor. Certificate 

#150008706 
Canada Trust Investment: 

Certificate #131-800211-7 



INTEREST MATURITY BOOK VALUE 



8 3/4% 82-10-17 

9 3/4% 82-02-01 

11 1/4% 84-09-28 

15 1/4% 84-11-25 



$5,000.00 
1,000.00 

1,000.00 

3,000.00 



MOTION RE: AUDITORS REPORT 

It was regularly moved by R.W.Bro. William Pellow 
seconded by R.W.Bro. Aage Bjerknes, that the auditors report 
be received, accepted and the recommendations acted upon. 
Carried. 

3. H.O.M.E. PROJECT TASK FORCE - R.W.Bro. Ed Drew, Chairman, 
reported that total contributions to the Lodge Room Restora- 
tion Project as of October 29 amounted to $14,200, and as of 
today it had increased to $20,000. While the program is 
reasonably on target he particularly stressed that everyone 
must aggresively promote the project to insure its ultimate 
success. 

GENERAL BUSINESS 

During a brief absence of the Secretary, R.W.Bro. Gary 
Powell suggested to the members present, that in recognition 
of faithful service rendered, that the Lodge provide 'undress 
grand lodge regalia for R.W.Bro. J. Pos following his recent 
election to the Board of General Purposes. It was regularly 
moved by R.W.Bro. Balfour LeGresley, seconded by V.W.Bro. 



- 15 



Laurie Brandridge that the Lodge purchase undress regalia 
(P.G.S.W.) for R.W.Bro. J. Pos . Carried by the applause of 
the Brethren. 

MOTION RE: COMPLIMENTARY SUBSCRIPTION TO THE LODGE 
PROCEEDINGS 

It was regularly moved by R.W.Bro. Ed Drew, seconded by 
R.W.Bro. Robert Jackson that the 10 District Representatives 
and 1 Committee Member who were not members of The Heritage 
Lodge and who were assisting in the fund raising activities 
of the H.O.M.E. Project be given a complimentary subscription 
to the Lodge Proceedings for the year 1982-83. Motion 
carried. 

MOTION RE: THE MASONIC HERITAGE CORPORATION BY-LAWS 

It was regularly moved by R.W.Bro. Ed Drew, seconded by 
W.Bro. Gordon Brittain that a copy of the proposed By-Laws 
of The Masonic Heritage Corporation, as prepared by W.Bro. 
Ronald Cooper, be sent to the Office of the Grand Secretary 
for information. Motion carried. 

NOTICE OF MOTION RE: LODGE BY-LAWS 

At this time, R.W.Bro. Frank J. Bruce, on behalf of R.W. 
Bro. Ed Wilson, presented the following notice of motion: 
"I hereby give notice that at the next Regular Meeting 
of The Heritage Lodge I will move, or cause to be moved, 
that the By-Laws of this Lodge as first published in 
the Lodge Proceedings, Vol. 2, No. 2, October, 1978, 
and subsequently amended and approved on different 
occasions and which have now been completely rewritten, 
deleting certain sections and adding other approved 
amendments and recommendations, as published in their 
entirety on pages 



At this time the Worshipful Master gave recognition to 
two outstanding members of The Heritage Lodge that have 
achieved great distinction during the past few months: 

1. M. W.Bro. William K. Bailey, P.G.M., has been elected 
President of the Masonic Relief Association of North 
America. 

2. R.W.Bro. Wallace E. McLeod, was Installed on November 11, 
1982 as Worshipful Master of Quatuor Coronati Lodge No. 
2076, London, England. He is the only Canadian member 

of Quatuor Coronati Lodge and the first North American 
to be Installed as Worshipful Master. Forty-four masons 
from Ontario were present for that historical event. 



16 



It was regularly moved by M.W.Bro. Wm. K. Bailey, 
seconded by W.Bro. Glenson T. Jones that the Secretary be 
instructed to send a letter of congratulation to R. W.Bro. 
McLeod. Motion carried. 

BALLOTING 

There being no objection, the Worshipful Master ordered 
a collective ballot to be taken on the 25 applications for 
membership as presented on pages 2 and 3 of the Lodge Pro- 
ceedings, Vol. 6, No. 1, dated September 1982. 

Following a favourable ballot on all applications, W.Bro, 
George E. Zwicker declared the following Brethren eligible 
for membership in The Heritage Lodge No. 730, G.R.C., by 
affiliation and requested each new member to affix his signa- 
ture to the Lodge Register at his earliest convenience in 
token of submission to the Lodge By-Laws: R.W.Bros.: Ralph 
Martin Brubacher, Wayne Earl Elgie, Durward I. Greenwood, 
W. Earl Rawson, Ford Nelson Rupert; W.Bros.: Victor Douglas 
Alyea, Alfred J. Bendle, Gordon Arnold Gross, Kenneth Grant 
Halbert, Leonard Harrison, Arthur Saxton; and Bros.: Ronald 
Bennett Stuart Brown, Reginald G. Carter, Bruce M. Grimbleby, 
Stephen Harvey Maizels, Richard Charles Slee, George E. 
Appleyard, Robert William Donald Wilson, Edward Mowat Jaques, 
Thomas Roy Davies, Victor Govan, Norman Lacasse, W.Bro. Frank 
Richardson and R. W.Bro. Warren Otto Mulack. 

CEREMONY OF INSTALLATION OF INVESTITURE 

At this time the Worshipful Master called on M.W.Bro. 
N. Rick Richards, Installing Master, to proceed with the 
ceremony of Installation and Investiture. 

Following a favourable report of the Examining Board, 
the Master Elect, R. W.Bro. Balfour LeGresley was presented 
by R. W.Bro. Ed Ralph. R. W.Bro. Charles Sankey recited the 
qualifications of a Worshipful Master and the Ancient Charges 
were presented by R. W.Bro. Ronald E. Groshaw, Deputy Grand 
Master. The Worshipful Master was Installed in the chair of 
King Soloman by M.W.Bro. Wm. K. Bailey. 

Following a most impressive and dignified ceremony the 
following Officers and the Worshipful Master were Invested 
with the symbols of their respective offices: 

Balfour LeGresley 
George E. Zwicker 
David C. Bradley 
Edwin Drew 
Arthur Watson 
Gary J. Powell 
Jacob Pos 
Robert S. Throop 



W.M. 


R. W.Bro. 


I. P.M. 


W.Bro. 


S.W. 


R. W.Bro. 


J.W. 


R. W.Bro. 


Chap. 


R. W.Bro. 


Treas. 


R. W.Bro. 


Sec'y. 


R. W.Bro. 


S.D. 


R. W.Bro. 



17 



J.D. W.Bro. Albert Barker 

S.S. R. W.Bro. Edmond Ralph 

J.S. W.Bro. Donald B. Kaufman 

D. of C. R. W.Bro. Aage Bjerknes 

Organist R. W.Bro. Leonard Hertel 

I.G. R. W.Bro. Edsel C. Steen 

Tyler V. W.Bro. Wilfred Greenhough 

Historian W.Bro. Allan J. Cohoe 

Asst. Sec'y. W.Bro. George Moore 

The General Charge was skillfully given by V. W.Bro. 
Ernest J. Brown and the Proclamation by M. W.Bro. Wm. K. 
Bailey. 

The Worshipful Master, R. W.Bro. Balfour LeGresley, then 
appointed the following: 

COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN 



GENERAL PURPOSES 
MEMBERSHIP 
REFRESHMENT 
MASONIC INFORMATION 
CENTRAL DATA BANK 
MASONIC MUSEUM 
LIBRARY 
PUBLICATIONS 
FINANCES 



R. W.Bro. David C. Bradley 

R. W.Bro. Ed Ralph 

R. W.Bro. Ed Ralph (S.S.) 

R. W.Bro. Frank J. Bruce 

W.Bro. James M. Major 

R. W.Bro. J. Pos 

W.Bro. Donald Cosens 

R. W.Bro. Clifford Baxter 

R. W.Bro. Ed Wilson 



(S.W.) 



Others 



FREEMASON EDITOR 
ARCHIVIST 
EDITORIAL BOARD 



W.Bro. Gregory Robinson 
W.Bro. Glen T. Jones 
R.W.Bros.: Wallace McLeod 
Frank Bruce 
Jack Pos 



At the conclusion of the ceremonies, R. W.Bro. David 
Bradley, on behalf of the Officers, Members and Visitors 
present extended a hearty and sincere vote of thanks to M.W. 
Bro. Richards and the Installing Board for a fine ceremony 
on this memorable evening. Bro. Bradley forecasted a bright 
future with new hands on the helm and new vigor and spirit 
in the officers and brethren in the various committees. 
In concluding with a simple Thank You he remarked that 
although the words were simple they were sincere and heart 
felt. 

In conveying the message to M.W. Bro. Richards, the 
Worshipful Master also expressed his thanks and presented 
Bor. Richards with a beautiful had crafted pillow displaying 
the traditional masonic symbols, the handi-work of Mrs. 
LeGresley. 



18 



D.D.G.M. ' S/REMARKS 

R.W.Bro. W. Gray Rivers, D.D.G.M. for Waterloo District, 
brought greetings from Quatuor Coronati Lodge in London, 
England, where he and 43 other masons and a number of wives 
were privileged to attend a banquet in honor of the Installa- 
tion of R.W.Bro. Wallace 13. McLeod as Worshipful Master. 
From his report from the District Secretary, W.Bro. Donald 
Kaufman, he complimented the Lodge on the excellent condition 
of the Lodge Records and the healthy financial condition of 
the Lodge. In searching his pocket dictionary for a defini- 
tion of heritage, he reviewed that it is the 'quality of a 
character that is passed down from generation to generation' ; 
as a Charter Member and its founding Chaplain he was proud 
to be a part of this Lodge, which, in conforming to his 
dictionary definition, had magnified that quality of life 
that The Heritage Lodge has endeavoured to promote since its 
inception. The Lodge and the Institution to which it belongs 
continutes to share and maintain the principles of morality 
and brotherhood. It is indeed a thrill to be part of such an 
organization and the memorable event last Monday in England 
and this unique experience this evening simply illustrates 
what the Craft has done, is still doing and will continue to 
do until time is no more. 

Following the announcement from the Senior Warden, R. 
W.Bro. David Bradley, that the next meeting of the Lodge 
Committee on General Purposes, would be held in the Preston- 
Hespeler Masonic Temple on Wednesday evening, February 16, 
1983, at 7:30 p.m., and on invitation from the Worshipful 
Master for a short refreshment period and fellowship in the 
banquet hall, the Lodge was closed in harmony at 11:25 p.m. 

FROM THE EAST 

Brethren, it has become customary at this time for the 
newly-installed Master to give a brief STATE OF THE UNION 
address. This is an appropriate time to review the past and 
lay designs for the coming year. 

May I first express my appreciation to each of our 
members for your expression of faith in electing me to 
this high office. The shoes of those whom I follow will 
be difficult to fill. Each of my predecessors, in turn, 
has made his particular contribution of leadership. This 
is the glowing coal that has sparked the fires through which 
our lodge has come to be respected across our jurisdiction. 
I can only pray that I may have guidance from above to help 
me to be worthy of this office you have entrusted to me. 

This is an exciting time in Heritage Lodge Brethren, 
we have just passed a traditional milestone - the completion 
of our first five years. If we examine our goals as 
stated in our By-Laws, I think we can feel happy and proud 
that we have made some progress in attaining several of them. 



- 19 



Our primary goal was to do and to report on historical 
research and we have been blessed with a series of excel- 
lent research papers. Some have been prepared by experienced 
masters but other were written by brethren with less 
practise as a first effort. We can be proud that we are 
encouraging potential authors to develop and bloom, yet, 
as we look to the future, we find that we never have 
enough papers under preparation. I would encourage others 
who have not tried to research and write a paper to do so. 
R.W.Bro. Frank Bruce would be delighted to help you select 
a topic. 

During the first five years our Lodge has had a number 
of special projects. Two years ago at the 125th anniversary 
of our Grand Lodge, the leadership and most of the hard 
work that produced the HERITAGE OF MASONRY DISPLAY and 
the play, THE BIRTH OF OUR GRAND LODGE came from members of 
this lodge and these projects were first suggested at our 
committee of General Purpose Meetings. Now we are in the 
midst of project H.O.M.E. - a project of major dimensions 
that was introduced by R.W.Bro. Groshaw two years ago when 
he was installed as Master of the Lodge. In organizing 
project H.O.M.E., our Lodge is giving leadership to all 
masons in Ontario so they may join with us to achieve a 
common goal. Not only will we restore a century-old 
lodgeroom in a suitable historic setting, but we will show 
Freemasonry to the visiting public, thus they may learn 
that Freemasonry was not only a source of comfort and 
strength to our Pioneer ancestors but that it is alive 
and well today as a guide to our lives. 

/ 

Because of the importance we attach to project H.O.M.E. 
I will not introduce any new plan this year that might 
detract from it. As the leaders of this project it is 

1 essential that each of us takes every possible opportunity 
to advertise it and to encourage all masons to dig as 
deeply into their pocket as is possible at this difficult 
time. We have a fine fund-raising team but it needs your 
support to achieve its goal. I must also inform you that 
the expediting task force under W.Bro. Alan Hogg is now 
active and searching for suitable furnishings for the 
completed Lodgeroom. Please discuss with him or members 
of his committee any items you might feel are suitable 
and which could be made available. 






While we may not plan to initiate a new major project, 
we must remember that the H.O.M.E. fires must be kept burning 
I have already mentioned the need for new authors and new 
papers, perhaps we can encourage some of those masons who 
have taken the excellent research course given by V. W.Bro. 
Ernest Brown and his team to advance to the next step and 
accept the challenge of a larger paper. The most difficult 
part is to get started, after that it becomes fun as well 
as interesting and rewarding. We are aware that in the 



- 20 



Quatuor Coronati Lodge the Master is obligated to present 
a paper. Last spring I had the pleasure of giving part 
of the presentation of the evening and I would like to 
encourage each of our officers to research and present a 
paper before you reach this chair. 

One of our problems has been the size of the jurisdic- 
tion this Lodge tries to serve. I can never fail to be 
impressed by the dedication of members who travel 300 
miles or more in an evening to share the friendship and 
enlightenment to be found in this Lodge. Somehow the 
evenings never seem to be long enough and I am embarrassed 
when we send you home as midnight approaches knowing that 
you may arrive just in time to have breakfast and start a 
busy day. This year I plan to adjust the presentation of 
lodge business so we can start the paper no later than 
nine o'clock. We will try to complete as much of our bus- 
iness as possible before the paper and the rest must wait 
until later. Naturally, the most important items will be 
dealt with first, this will allow those who have some 
distance to travel to get home in reasonable time. 

The introduction of correponding subscribers has been 
one attempt to solve the problem of distance. Another 
that will be encouraged this year will be the holding of 
local discussion groups by distant members where papers may 
be presented and later reported in our proceedings. 

One other difficulty in dealing with this large juris- 
diction is that of securing officer representation from 
many districts. We are all aware that travelling costs 
have increased sharply and to be an officer of this Lodge 
progressing through a ladder that lasts for a decade could 
become a burden to many capable of giving the kind of 
leadership the lodge deserves and needs. I have no magic 
answer to this problem but I hope that in coming months our 
officers will feel free to discuss it and make recommenda- 
tions. 

Once again we plan to have a travelling visitation. This 
time it is to be in Toronto and sponsored by Toronto District 
7. The date is Wednesday, March 2nd, 1983, at the Davenport 
Temple, 888 Yonge St. at 7:30 p.m. Our speaker will be 
M.W.Bro. Eric Nancekivell. The May meeting will be in 
Hespeler and will feature several masons whose lives are 
rich in Masonic history. 

We hope to see our committees and special representa- 
tives try new things this year. For example, our membership 
committee may ask you to complete a questionnaire so we 
may learn more about one another. We know that our members 
possess a rich resource of hidden skills and we hope to find 
more ways to make use of them. Our Librarian plans to seek 
ways to make our library resources more available to our 



21 



members and we welcome W.Bro. Donald Cosens to this office. 
W.Bro. Allan Cohoe, our Historian plans to create a detailed 
index to the research papers that have already been presented, 
W.Bro. Greg Robinson is working to develop a format for a 
regular column in THE FREEMASON and we should be grateful 
to the publisher, V. W.Bro. M. Beach for making this possible. 

Brethren, there are other areas where we can strengthen 
the work to which we are already committed and I expect 
each of our members to contribute fully. I hope that you 
can share in this sense of excitement that lies in the 
months ahead but our meetings are far apart and the year 
passes quickly. Don't wait until the next meeting to do 
something to help our Lodge - start now and plan to do a 
little each day or week. If we each move tiny pebbles often 
who knows what a pile of achievement we may have by the 
end of the year! 

Brethren, the Christmas season will have come and gone 
before we may meet again. May I now wish you every happiness 
and joy as another New Year begins. 

R. W.Bro. Balfour LeGresley, W.M. 



- 22 - 

PROPOSED NEW LODGE BY-LAWS 
(To be discussed at the next G.P. Meeting, Feb. 16, 1983) 

THE HERITAGE LODGE NO. 73 
A.F.&A.M. , G.R.C. 



A Brief History 

The first notion for the development of a Historical 
Lodge was conceived in the hearts and minds of a number of 
concerned Masons who had become particularly disturbed over 
erosion of our masonic heritage and the apathy towards its 
preservation. Each year unknown quantities of masonic 
books, papers, documents and other memorabilia are inno- 
centely disposed of by families or estates of departed 
Brethren simply because there is no place or procedure to 
donate or receive masonic artifacts for cataloging, restor- 
ation, preservation and display of these important links 
with the past. 

This important subject became a topic of much discus- 
sion at the Second Regional Masonic Workshops held in Brant- 
ford and Hanover in 1976. The interest generated during 
and following the meetings provided the incentive to 
proceed with the initial planning for the formation of a 
unique body of masons for the express purpose of providing 
a means for the preservation of our masonic heritage. 

The first meetings were held in private homes but 
these soon expanded into well attended organizational 
meetings held in Masonic Temples in Guelph, Waterloo, 
Georgetown and Cambridge as well as the land mark meeting 
held at the University of Guelph. On several occasions 
prominent speakers were invited to discuss the merits of 
the proposed objectives. After reviewing the progress to 
date and a careful analysis of the causes of failure of like 
masonic bodies and research associations of the past, it 
was obvious that an organizational structure was needed 
that would provide some measure of continuity and permanence 
What better choice, to ensure the future of the proposed 
objectives, than the basic structure of a Craft Lodge that 
has endured the vagaries of time for more than 600 years. 

Such a lodge could provide an intellectual environment 
for the pursuit of Masonic knowledge, and also provide a 
means for receiving and recording historical artifacts to 
ensure the preservation of our Masonic Heritage without 
encroachment on the normal functions of Constitutent Lodges 
whose province it is to initiate candidates, confer degrees 
and provide light and instruction for the Brethren in 
Masonry. 



- 23 



The lodge would accept, by affiliation in the usual 
manner, all masons of like mind who are desirous of working 
together to fulfill the aims and objectives established by 
the membership; and by the unique character of its purpose, 
it would compliment the work of the other Lodges by directing 
its principal efforts to the following objectives: 

1. To preserve, maintain and uphold those historical 
events that formed the foundation of Ancient, Free 
and Accepted Masonry. 

2. To promote the study of Masonry in general and 
provide a service by responding to requests for 
masonic information. 

3. To produce Lodge Proceedings, Research Papers, and 
Historical Reviews; and to arrange special lectures 
and visual presentations. 

4. To organize and maintain a "Central Inventory" of 
items of Historical interest in the possession of 
Lodges. 

5. To encourage participation by Regular Lodges and 
their Members, in the activities of this Lodge. 

6. To endeavour to establish a "Masonic Museum". 

7. To encourage Masonic Scholars and Lodge Historians 
to become more interested in the history of their 
own Lodge and its artifacts. 

The Petition for a Warrant of Constitution, which was 
sent to the Grand Master of the Most Honourable Fraternity 
of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of Canada in the Prov- 
ince of Ontario, was signed by 104 dedicated Charter Members. 
Their prayers having been answered, the Lodge came into 
being under Dispensation, dated September 9, 1977, by the 
authority of the Grand Master, Most Worshipful Brother Robert 
Edwin Davies. The Institution Ceremony took place on 
September 21, 1977, under the direction of R.W.Bro. Charles 
F. Grimwood, District Deputy Grand Master for Waterloo 
District. 

By the time of the Fourth REgular Meeting of the Lodge 
in May, 1978, an additional 65 Masons had applied for 
membership, bringing the total to 169, representing 98 
Lodges from 27 Districts. The Brethren look forward to 
exciting new concepts in masonic outreach as they endeavour 
to carry out the duties they have obligated themselves to 
perform. May the Great Architect of the Unvierse prosper 
those endeavours. 

J. Pos, 1978 



24 



THE HERITAGE LODGE NO. 7 30 
A.F. & A.M. , G.R.C. 

CHARTER MEMBERS 



Abdul Alarakhia 
James N. Allan 
Leslie G. Allan 
Ernest J.B. Anderson 
William K. Bailey 
Albert A. Barker 
Kenneth G. Bartlett 
Walter H. Benallick 
George Blackie 
Harry R. Bolton 
Fred W. Bowery 
Clyde Bowman 
David C. Bradley 
Fred R. Branscombe 
Gordon R. Brittain 
Ernest G. Britton 
Allan E. Broadley 
Claude Brodeur 
Sidney A. Browell 
Ernest J. Brown 
Chesley R. Buton 
David J. Butcher 
Robert J.L. Butler 
George A. Campbell 
Marvin B.R. Campbell 
Robert W. Carpenter 
Allan J. Cohoe 
Ronald G. Cooper 
Peter Corbin 
G. Ivor Davies 
C. Laverne Dawdy 
Richard H.W. Deacon 
James DeZeeuw 
Charles E. Drew 
Paul R. Engel 
James A. Faulkner 
James A. Faulkner 
Oliver T. Flint 
Keith R.A. Flynn 
G. Alexander Forbes 
Gary J.T. Forsyth 
Charles Fotheringham 
George B. German 
James W. Gerrard 
Donald H. Gorman 
R.W.Bro. Arch David Grant 

H. Stewart Greavette 
Donald G.S. Grinton 
Ronald E. Groshaw 
Donald R. Hall 
Stanley T. Halliwell 



Bro. 

M.W.Bro. 

W.Bro. 

W.Bro. 

M.W.Bro. 

Bro. 

Bro. 

Bro. 

W.Bro. 

Bro. 

R.W.Bro. 

W.Bro. 

R.W.Bro. 

R.W.Bro. 

Bro. 

W.Bro. 

R.W.Bro. 

Bro. 

R.W.Bro. 

W.Bro. 

W.Bro. 

W.Bro. 

W.Bro. 

W.Bro. 

Bro. 

V. W.Bro. 

W.Bro. 

Bro. 

W.Bro. 

R.W.Bro. 

V. W.Bro. 

W.Bro. 

W.Bro. 

R.W.Bro. 

W.Bro. 

*W.Bro. 

Bro. 

*W.Bro. 

R.W.Bro. 

W.Bro. 

Bro. 

R.W.Bro. 

W.Bro. 

R.W.Bro. 

Bro. 



W.Bro. 
R.W.Bro. 
R.W.Bro. 
R.W.Bro. 

W.Bro. 



R.W.Bro. George H.C. Hardy 

R.W.Bro. Roston E. Hargreaves 

W.Bro. Alan D. Hogg 

R.W.Bro. John B. Hunter 

R.W.Bro. James H. Hutchinson 

W.Bro. Harvey E. Jones 

Bro. John Wm. Jones 

W.Bro. Donald B. Kaufman 

V. W.Bro. Randall D. Langs 

V. W.Bro. W. Robert Lawson 

V. W.Bro. Albert L. Lee 

W.Bro. C.E.Balfour LeGresley 

*V. W.Bro. James E. Lumley 

W.Bro. Stanley W. Lyons 

Bro. Roderick S. Macintosh 

R.W.Bro. Wallace E. McLeod 

V. W.Bro. Robert S. McMaster 

*R. W.Bro. William S. McVittie 

W.Bro. Bertie A. Mennie 

W.Bro. Malcom G. Morin 

Bro. David Nicholls 

R.W.Bro. Irwin G. Noble 

W.Bro. Leroy K. Norton 

R.W.Bro. Clare A. Parsons 

V. W.Bro. Jacob Pos 

R.W.Bro. Gary J. Powell 

R.W.Bro. N. Richard Richards 

Bro. Rev. W. Gray Rivers 

Bro. Gregory C. Robinson 

W.Bro. Horace H.C. Rose 

R.W.Bro. Charles A. Sankey 

W.Bro. Oliver W.D. Sayer 

W.Bro. Jack Shipp 

W.Bro. Lee D. Simington 

Bro. Alan I. Smith 

R.W.Bro. Roy S. Sparrow 

Bro. Herbert F. Steele 

R.W.Bro. Edsel C. Steen 

W.Bro. Norman E. Taylor 

Bro. Peter E. Taylor 

V. W.Bro. Stewart L. Thurtell 

V. W.Bro. Ralph G. Tucker 

W.Bro. Joseph J. Vliehs 

R.W.Bro. William H. Wells 

W.Bro. Robert J. Welt 

Bro. William E. Westbrook 

V. W.Bro. Joseph H.A. White 

R.W.Bro. Terrence R. Williams 

R.W.Bro. W. Edwin C. Wilson 

Bro. Richard M. Zimmerman 

Bro. George E. Zwicker 



Deceased 



25 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

A Brief History 22 

Charter Members 24 

Table of Contents 25 

Preamble 2 7 

Article I, 1. Name 2 7 

Article II, 1. Relation to Grand Lodge 27 

Article III, 1. Purpose and Objectives 27 

Article IV, 1. Regular Meetings 28 

2. Emergent Meetings 28 

3. Installation & Investiture 28 

Article V, 1. Officers 28 

Article VI, 1. Duties of Officers 29 

2. Worshipful Master 29 

3. Immediate Past Master 29 

4. Senior Warden 29 

5. Junior Warden 2 9 

6. Chaplain 29 

7. Treasurer 30 

8. Secretary 3 

9. Assistant Secretary 31 

10. Deacons 31 

11. Director of Ceremonies 31 

12. Stewards 31 

13. Inner Guard 31 

14. Tyler 32 

15. Organist 32 

16. Historian 32 

17. Auditors 32 

18. Scrutineers & Editor 42 

19. Archivist 32 

Article VII, 1. Committees and Corporation 33 

2. Appointment of Committees 3 3 

3. The Masonic Heritage Corporation . . 33 
Article VIII Duties of Committees 33 

1. General Purposes 33 

2. Membership & Unattached Masons ... 34 

3. Refreshment & Entertainment .... 34 

4. Masonic Information 34 

5. Central Data Bank 34 

6. Masonic Museum 35 

7. Lodge Library 3 5 

8. Lodge Publications 35 

9. Reports 3 6 

Article IX, Membership 36 

1. Admission to Membership 36 

2. Honorary Membership 3 6 

3. Resignation of Members 37 

Article X, Rules of Order 37 

Article XI, Vote on the Ballot 38 



26 - 



Table of Contents Cont'd. 



Page 



Article XII, Fees and Dues 38 

1. Initiation 38 

2. Affiliation 38 

3. Annual Dues . 38 

4. Life Membership 38 

Article XIII, Arrears of Fees and Dues 39 

Article XIV, Restoration 39 

Article XV, Corresponding Subscriber 39 

Article XVI, Financial Year 39 

Article XVII, 1. Lodge Funds 40 

2. Operating Fund 4 

3. Capital Fund 40 

4. Life Membership Fund 41 

Article XVIII, Visitors 41 

Article XIX, Contingencies 41 

Article XX, Alterations to the By-Laws .... 41 

Article XXI, Signing of By-Laws 41 

Article XXII, Communications 42 

Appendix A, Administration of Life Membership 

Plan for The Heritage Lodge 4 3 

Appendix B, Initiation, Affiliation and Annual 

Fees 45 

Appendix C, The Masonic Heritage Corporation ... 46 

Appendix D, Editorial Policy 48 



- 27 - 

BY-LAWS 

of 

THE HERITAGE LODGE NO. 730 

G.R.C. , A.F. & A.M. 

Instituted 5977 

In the Province of Ontario 

PREAMBLE 

Order and regularity being essentially necessary for the 
preservation of that harmony and decorum which should at 
all times characterize Freemasons, the Brethren of The 
Heritage Lodge of Ancient, Free and Accepted Masons, No. 
730, on the Register of the Grand Lodge of Canada in the 
Province of Ontario, do agree to and hereby enact the 
following By-Laws: 

ARTICLE I - NAME 

1. This Lodge shall be known as "The Heritage Lodge", A.F. 
& A.M. , No. 730, G.R.C. 

ARTICLE II - RELATION TO GRAND LODGE 

1. This Lodge fully acknowledges the supremacy of the Grand 
Lodge of Ancient, Free and Accepted Masons of Canada, in 
the Province of Ontario, and will at all times pay due 
respect and obedience to its laws, rules, orders and regula- 
tions. 

ARTICLE III - PURPOSE AND OBJECTIVES 

1. To preserve, maintain and uphold those Historical Events 
that formed the foundation of Ancient, Free and Accepted 
Masonry. 

2. To promote the study of Masonry in general and provide 

a service by responding to requests for masonic information. 

3. To produce Lodge Proceedings, Research Papers, and 
Historical Reviews; and to arrange special lectures and 
visual presentations. 

4. To organize and maintain a "Central Inventory" of items 
of Historical interest in the possession of Lodges. 

5. To encourage participation by Regular Lodges and their 
Members, in the activities of this Lodge. 



28 - 



6. To endeavour to establish a "Masonic Museum". 

7. To encourage Masonic Scholars and Lodge Historians to 
become more interested in the history of their own Lodge 
and its artifacts. 

ARTICLE IV - MEETINGS 

REGULAR MEETINGS 

1. Regular Meetings of the Lodge shall be held the third 
Wednesday of the months of September, November, March and 
May, at 7:30 p.m. in the Preston-Hespeler Temple, Cambridge. 

EMERGENT MEETINGS 

2. Emergent Meetings may be held as provided for in the 
Book of Constitution, at the discretion of the Worshipful 
Master. 

INSTALLATION AND INVESTITURE 

3. The Worshipful Master shall be Installed and the other 
Officers Invested annually at the Regular Meeting in November 

ARTICLE V - OFFICERS 

1. The Officers of the Lodge shall be: Worshipful Master, 
Senior Warden, Junior Warden, Secretary, Treasurer, Chaplain, 
Senior Deacon, Junior Deacon, Inner Guard, Senior Steward, 
Junior Steward, Organist, Director of Ceremonies, Historian, 
Assistant Secretary and Tyler. When officially recognized, 
the compliment of Officers shall also include the Archivist. 

2. The following Officers shall be elected annually at 
the Regular Meeting in September by written ballot: Wor- 
shipful Master, Senior Warden, Junior Warden, Secretary and 
Treasurer. 

3. The following shall be elected annually at the Regular 
Meeting in September by open vote: Tyler, two Auditors, an 
Examining Board composed of three Installed Masters, and 
the required number of members for The Masonic Heritage 
Corporation. 

4. The Worshipful Master, on the occasion of the Election 
of Officers, shall appoint three Brethren as Scruitineers 
of the ballot. 

5. The Worshipful Master, after having consulted with the 
Elected Officers and the Past Masters of the Lodge, shall 
appoint the following: Senior Deacon, Junior Deacon, Inner 
Guard, Senior Steward, Junior Steward, Chaplain, Organist, 
Historian, Director of Ceremonies, Assistant Secretary 

and Archivist. 



29 - 



ARTICLE VI - DUTIES OF OFFICERS 

1. Every Brother elected or appointed to office, pledges 
himself by his acceptance of that office to a strict and 
punctual performance of the duties thereof. In like manner 
and in accordance with ancient Masonic custom that "three 
rule a lodge", the Worshipful Master is encouraged to consult 
regularly with the Wardens so that major decisions and 
instructions will reflect a consensus and to develop a 
harmony of purpose that will promote continuity in the 
direction of the Lodge program. 

WORSHIPFUL MASTER 

2. The Worshipful Master, in addition to conforming to the 
ancient charges and regulations and performing the duties 
laid down in the Book of Constitution, shall be responsible 
for the safe deeping of the Warrant and other Lodge Records, 
Books and Papers. He shall sign all orders on the Treasurer 
and be (ex-officio) a member of all Committees. 

IMMEDIATE PAST MASTER 

3. The duties of the immediate Past Master, are those 
designated to him by the Worshipful Master and the Ritual, 
and are not fixed by any By-Laws. 

SENIOR WARDEN 

4. The Senior Warden, in addition to performing the regular 
duties appertaining to his office shall, under direction of 
the Worshipful Master, see to the proper keeping of the 
jewels, furniture and other property of the Lodge, and cause 
them to be properly insured. He shall, immediately after 
his investiture, examine the inventory of the same and report 
his findings to the Lodge for entry in the Minute Book. He 
shall, subject to the approval of the Worshipful Master, be 
Chairman of the Committee of General Purposes. 

JUNIOR WARDEN 

5. The Junior Warden, besides attending to the regular 
duties of his office shall, with the assistance of the Deac- 
ons and under the authority of the Worshipful Master, make 
all necessary arrangements for transportation for lodge 
visitations. 

CHAPLAIN 

6. The Chaplain shall attend regularly and punctually all 
meetings of the Lodge, deliver invocations and perform such 
other duties appropriate to his office. 



- 30 - 



TREASURER 

7. The Treasurer shall receive all monies of the Lodge and 
shall promptly deposit same in a Chartered Bank or Trust 
Company approved by the Lodge to the account of "The Heritage 
Lodge No. 730", G.R.C., A.F. & A.M. He shall from time to 
time advise the Secretary of the amounts deposited. 

He shall keep proper books in which all receipts, dis- 
bursements, invested funds, lodge inventory and other lodge 
assets shall be duly entered. He shall pay all authorized 
accounts promptly, keeping a regular account of same. Money 
may only be drawn out by cheque on order drawn by the 
Worshipful Master and Secretary jointly. 

The Lodge books, records and vouchers shall be available 
for inspection by the Officers of the Lodge or the Auditors 
at any time. His accounts, records and vouchers shall be 
submitted annually to the Auditors after the fiscal year 
ending August 31, and not later than one full week previous 
to the day of the Annual Installation and Investiture. He 
shall transfer to his successor immediately after his 
Investment all monies, together with all other property of 
the Lodge in his possession. 

He shall be exempt from payment of all Lodge dues 
during his term of office. 

SECRETARY 

8. The Secretary shall keep a prompt and faithful record 
of the proceedings of the Lodge in prescribed form, and 
preserve in proper order all books, documents and papers 
related thereto. He shall maintain a correct and current 
register of the members and their respective accounts 
with the Lodge. He shall receive all monies paid to the 
Lodge by the members and by other sources, issue a receipt 
and promptly transfer same to the Treasurer. He shall 
certify all accounts passed by the Lodge and prepare warrants 
for payment of same by the Treasurer. 

He shall notify all members of the meetings in accord- 
ance with the Rules of Grand Lodge as recorded in the Book 
of Constitution, and advise them of the time at which they 
must be present at all meetings. He must countersign all 
orders and charges of the Worshipful Master, prepare, 
deliver to him and retain copies of all returns required 
by the Grand Lodge and notify the members of each committee 
of their appointment and the nature of their duties. 

He shall annually, at the end of the fiscal year and 
no later than one full week previous to the day of the Annual 
Installation and Investiture, submit his books and records 
to the Auditors for examination and shall transfer the same 
to his successor immediately after his Investiture, unless 



31 



the Lodge may otherwise direct; and on the night of Installa- 
tion and Investiture he shall produce the Auditor's Report 
in accordance with the Book of Constitution. He shall have 
charge of the Seal of the Lodge, sign all authorized 
Certificates and generally, under the direction of the 
Worshipful Master, perform such duties appertaining to the 
office of Secretary as may be conducive to the best interest 
of the Lodge. He shall be exempt from payment of all lodge 
dues during his term of office, and shall be paid such 
honorarium as the Lodge may by resolution from time to time 
direct. 

ASSISTANT SECRETARY 

9. The Assistant Secretary shall carry out such duties as 
are delegated to him by the Secretary, and in the Secretary's 
absence or incapacity act on his behalf. He shall perform 
such other duties commensurate with the office of Assistant 
Secretary as may be assigned to him by the Worshipful Master. 
He shall also, subject to the approval of the Worshipful 
Master and Senior Warden, act as Secretary of the "General 
Purpose" Committee. He shall be exempt from payment of all 
lodge dues during his term of office. 

DEACONS 

10. The Deacons shall attend the Master and Wardens in 
opening the Lodge and in the ceremonies and introduction of 
distinguished guests, and visitors, and perform such other 
duties as the Worshipful Master and Wardens may direct. 

DIRECTOR OF CEREMONIES 

11. The Director of Ceremonies shall introduce all visiting 
brethren. He shall, with the assistance of the Stewards, 
see that the Lodge Room is properly prepared. He shall act, 
under the direction of the Worshipful Master, as marshal 
for all processions and public occasions. 

STEWARDS 

12. The Stewards shall assist the Director of Ceremonies in 
seeing that all visitors are properly accommodated, that the 
Lodge Room is properly prepared, and generally to attend any 
ceremonies the Lodge may take part in. The Senior Steward, 
with assistance from the Junior Steward, and other Brethren 
when directed by the Junior Warden, shall make the necessary 
arrangements for refreshments on all occasions. 

INNER GUARD 

13. The Inner Guard shall attend each meeting punctually 
at the appointed hour, guard the entrance of the Lodge, 
receive visitors and candidates, and give direction to the 
Tyler.. 



32 



TYLER 

14. The Tyler shall be in regular attendance and diligently 
guard the portals of the Lodge. He shall see that all 
brethren register their names before entering the Lodge and 
perform such other duties as the Lodge may direct. 

ORGANIST 

15. The Organist shall be responsible for the musical part 
of the ceremonies and such other harmonious duties as the 
Worshipful Master may direct. 

HISTORIAN 

16. The Historian shall keep a faithful chronicle of the 
important and significant Lodge events during his term of 
office. A written summary of the previous year's history, 
including special events, is to be submitted annually to 
the Worshipful Master before the Regular Meeting in Sept- 
ember, for the Historical Record of the Lodge. 

AUDITORS 
(Not an officer) 

17. The Auditors shall annually and whenever called upon 
by the Committee of General Purposes or the Lodge, audit 
the books, accounts and other records of the Treasurer and 
Secretary and shall examine the investments and other 
securities of the Lodge. They shall present a report in 
writing to the Lodge on the night of and before the Instal- 
lation of the Worshipful Master and at any other time the 
Worshipful Master may direct. Such report shall show all 
receipts and disbursements as well as all the assets and 
liabilities of the Lodge up to the end of the financial 
year. 

ARCHIVIST 
(Not an officer) 

19. The Archivist shall be responsible for the safekeeping 
of all literature, papers, records, books and other documents 
having historical value to Masons, which may have been 
placed in his care. He shall maintain a full and accurate 
record of the same, including such information as sources, 
donors, dates of origin and aquisition, and brief descrip- 
tions of each item. He shall make such information avail- 
able to any member of the Lodge on written request. He 
shall periodically publish a list of all items under his 
care. 

For SCRUTINEERS & EDITOR see page 42. 



33 - 



ARTICLE VII - COMMITTEES AND CORPORATION 

1. Committees are a very important part of the organiza- 
tional structure of this unique Lodge. They not only 
ensure a democratic process of lodge government and provide 
a means for active participation by the lodge members, but 
also provide a measure of continuity for the future of the 
Lodge. Under good leadership, lodge committees, working 

in harmony and directed toward the aims and objectives, 
established under ARTICLE III, and the basic principles 
of Freemasonry, will provide the most desirable environment 
for the brethren to produce significant recommendations 
for the continuing success of the Lodge. 

APPOINTMENT OF COMMITTEES 

2. The Worshipful Master shall, on the day of his Instal- 
lation or as soon thereafter as conveniently possible; 
appoint all standing and special Committees, unless such 
appointment is provided for otherwise in these By-Laws. 

The active committees of the Lodge are included in 
the following list: other committees may be appointed 
by the Worshipful Master as circumstances may require: 

i. General Purposes 

ii. Membership and Unattached Masons 

iii. Refreshment and Entertainment 

iv. Masonic Information 

v. Central Data Bank 

vi. Masonic Museum 

vii. Lodge Library 

viii. Lodge Publications 

ix. Lodge Finances 

THE MASONIC HERITAGE CORPORATION 

3. The Masonic Heritage Corporation is the legal component 
of the Lodge. The objects of incorporation are listed in 
Appendix C. 

ARTICLE VIII - DUTIES OF COMMITTEES 
GENERAL PURPOSES 

1. The Committee of General Purposes shall consist of 
the Worshipful Master, Senior Warden, Junior Warden, all 
other Lodge Officers, Committee Chairmen and Past Masters 
of the Lodge, who are obligated to attend, and all Members 
of the Lodge, who are encouraged to attend. The Senior 
Warden shall, with the approval of the Worshipful Master, 
be the Chairman. The Assistant Secretary shall, subject 
to the approval of the Worshipful Master and Senior Warden, 
be Secretary of the Committee. The Committee shall meet 
at such times as the Worshipful Master shall direct. Seven 
Members of this Committee shall constitute a quorum. 



- 34 



The Committee shall monitor the financial affairs and 
report to the Lodge. It shall have full power to inspect 
all books, accounts and papers belonging to the Lodge and 
make recommendations to the Lodge relative to any alterna- 
tions required therein, except the Minutes of the Lodge. 
The Committee shall have the authority to summon to attend 
its meetings, any Officer or other Members having possession 
of any books or papers belonging to the Lodge. 

The Members of the Committee shall inform themselves 
of all accounting procedures and become familiar with the 
method of Lodge payments. They shall discuss the operations 
and welfare of this Lodge in particular and the Craft 
in general and deal with matters directed to their atten- 
tion during regular meetings, and bring their recommenda- 
tions to the next regular meeting of the Lodge. The 
Secretary of the Committee shall record the minutes of all 
meetings and submit them to the Senior Warden. 

MEMBERSHIP AND UNATTACHED MASONS 

2. Each Member of the Lodge shall assume a measure of 
considerable responsibility in this important area of 
masonic outreach. It should be the concern of every Brother 
to encourage unattached masons to renew their interest 

in Freemasonry. The Chairman of this Committee shall be 
appointed by the Worshipful Master. The Senior Deacon 
shall assist in the work of this Committee. 

REFRESHMENT AND ENTERTAINMENT 

3. The Senior Steward, with the assistance of the Junior 
Steward, shall be responsible for refreshments during the 
Social Hour at the conclusion of the Regular Meetings of 
the Lodge, and on other occasions when requested by the 
Worshipful Master. 

MASONIC INFORMATION 

4. The Committee on Masonic Information shall be guided by 
the first three objectives (ARTICLE III) established by 
the Lodge. The Members of the Committee shall be respon- 
sible for planning the educational portion of Lodge Meetings 
at least one year in advance and preferably two years in 
advance on a continuing basis. They shall also be respon- 
sible, with the approval and assistance of the Worshipful 
Master and Secretary, for planning the details of Lodge 
Visitations. 

CENTRAL DATA BANK 

5. The Committee on the Central Data Bank shall, in 
accordance with items 4 and 7 of the Lodge Objectives (ARTICLE 
III) , organize and maintain a central inventory of items 

of Masonic Historial interest in the safe keeping of Masonic 



35 - 



Lodges; and shall encourage such lodges, by providing 
assistance to Lodge Historians, to take an active interest 
in the History and Masonic Artifacts of their respective 
Lodges. 

The composition of this Committee shall consist of no 
less than three Executive Officers (to insure continuity) 
and a general membership, made up in the main of Lodge 
Historians and other interested Masons. As the membership 
of this Lodge and the activities of this particular 
Committee continues to increase, sub-committees may be 
established on a Regional basis. 

MASONIC MUSEUM 

6. The Committee on Masonic Museum shall, in accordance 
with Item 6 of the Lodge Objectives (ARTICLE III) , arrange 
for suitable facilities to exhibit, for public display, 
important masonic artifacts as they become available for 
that purpose. 

The members of the Committee shall encourage Lodges 
to restore their own masonic artifacts and to provide suit- 
able facilities for their protection and exhibition in 
their respective Lodges. 

The Chairman of the Committee on the Masonic Museum, 
shall be one of the Executive Officers of the Committee 
on the Central Data Bank. 

LODGE LIBRARY 

7. The unique character of The Heritage Lodge and the 
Objectives it has engaged itself to fulfill, will require 
resources beyond the capabilities of the Lodge. Some 
Masonic Scholars, contributing to the Lodge Programs, 
will rely on their private collections or other sources, 
and would find it inconvenient to operate from a common 
source. Nevertheless, books are being donated to the Lodge 
and these should be made available to the Brethren, especially 
young masons searching for light and truth. 

As the future activities of the Lodge increase, a more 
active relationship between The Heritage Lodge Library and 
The Grand Lodge Library should be established and maintained. 

LODGE PUBLICATIONS 

8. The Committee on Lodge Publications shall, in accordance 
with the Purpose and Objectives (ARTICLE III) of the Lodge, 
be responsible for the publication of Lodge Bulletins, 
Proceedings, Books and other material in connection with the 
extension activities of the Lodge. 



- 36 



An Editorial Board consisting of not less than three 
members shall be responsible for the establishment and 
maintenance of a Lodge approved Editorial Policy for Lodge 
Publications. 

All material received for publication shall be reviewed 
edited and approved in compliance with the Editorial Policy, 
as outlined in Appendix D of these By-Laws. 

REPORTS 

9. All Committees shall report annually on the activities 
for the current year. Each report shall be submitted in 
writing by the Chairman or his designate within 30 days of 
the end of the fiscal year of the Lodge. 

Immediately following their appointment and at their 
earliest convenience, all Committees shall prepare a plan 
of action and a budget for the coming year. Such budgets 
shall be submitted to the Secretary of the General Purpose 
Committee before its next Meeting. 

ARTICLE IX - MEMBERSHIP 

ADMISSION TO MEMBERSHIP 

1. Every applicant for membership in this Lodge shall 
complete and sign the petition in accordance with the form 
approved by the Grand Lodge. The petition shall be duly 
signed by at least five Master Masons in good standing, 
two of whom must be members of The Heritage Lodge, as 
proposers of the applicant. 

The petition shall be received and accepted in open 
lodge, and be published in the Lodge Summons for the next 
Regular Meeting. 

No petition shall be balloted upon by the Lodge unless 
notice thereof, stating the full name, age, occupation, 
residence of the applicant and names of the sponsors shall 
have been given in the summons for the meeting at which the 
petition is to be considered. 

HONORARY MEMBERSHIP 

2. Any Brother, whether a member of this Lodge or not, who 
has rendered exemplary service to this Lodge, or the Craft 
in general, may be elected an Honorary Member of this Lodge. 

Such membership requires a written recommendation from 
two members in good standing in the Lodge. A notice of 
motion together with the names of the two members making the 
recommendation must appear in the summons for the next 
Regular Meeting, when a three-fourths ballot vote of the 
members present shall.be required for election to Honorary 
Membership. 



- 37 



RESIGNATION OF MEMBERS 

3. Save as hereafter provided, any member desiring to 
withdraw from the Lodge and not in arrears for dues may 
resign, and upon so doing he shall be furnished with a 
certificate of his standing. Such resignation shall take 
effect from receipt of same by the Secretary and shall be 
reported to the next REgular Meeting of the Lodge. 

The Lodge may, by resolution, accept the resignation 
of a member in arrears for dues, in which case the certif- 
icate of his standing shall state the fact and the amount 
of his indebtedness. 

No member who is under suspension or gainst whom a 
charge of unmasonic conduct is pending shall have the right 
or be permitted to resign. 

ARTICLE X - RULES OF ORDER 

1. The Order for Business at Regular Meetings of the Lodge 
shall be at the discretion of the Worshipful Master. 

2. The Worshipful Master may require any motion to be put 
in writing with the names of the mover and seconder 
appended thereto; no motion shall be open for discussion 
until presented to the Lodge by the Worshipful Master. 

3. All motions shall be decided by a majority of votes, 
unless otherwise provided. In the case of a tie vote, the 
Worshipful Master shall have the deciding vote. 

4. The votes of the members are given by each inclining 
upwards his right hand, which shall be counted by the 
Worshipful Master or the Deacons, unless the numbers should 
be so unequal as to render counting unnecessary. 

5. No Brother shall speak more than once on the same 
question without the permission of the Worshipful Master, 
unless in explanation, or in the case of the person intro- 
ducing the motion to make a reply. 

6. Any Brother wishing to speak to the question or to 
submit a motion shall rise and remain standing, and when 
recognized shall respectfully address the Worshipful 
Master confining his remarks to the question and observing 
due order and decorum. 

7. On a point of order being raised while a Brother is 
speaking, or when a Brother is called to order by the 
Worshipful Master, the Brother so interrupted shall at 
once take his seat; when the point of order has been made 
by the Brother objecting, the Worshipful Master shall 
decide thereupon without the question being debated. The 
Brother may then proceed in the proper form. 



38 



8. No amendment to a motion shall be in order after an 
amendment to an amendment, unless to table the motion. 

ARTICLE XI - VOTE ON THE BALLOT 

1. In Balloting on a petition, every Member present must 
vote. All Members must therefore come up to the performance 
of trust with firmness, candor, and a full determination 

to do right; to allow no personal timidity to forbid the 
deposit of a black ball if the applicant is unworthy, 
and no liberal prejudice to prevent the deposition of a 
white ball if the character and qualifications of the 
candidate are unobjectionable. 

2. No Member can be called to an account for the ballot 
he has deposited. 

3. No applicant shall become a member of the Lodge, if 
on the ballot more than one black ball appear against him. 

4. When an applicant has been black balled, he is to be 
notified by the Secretary, and the matter should remain 
a profound secret between the members of the fraternity 
and the applicant. 

5. It is a gross masonic offence for any member to make 
public the action of the Lodge in black balling an applicant, 

ARTICLE XII - FEES AND DUES 

INITIATION 

1. The fee for Initiation shall be in accordance with the 
terms of Appendix B of these By-Laws. 

AFFILIATION 

2. The fee for Affiliation shall be in accordance with the 
terms of Appendix B of these By-Laws. 

ANNUAL DUES 

3. The annual dues shall be in accordance with the terms 
of Appendix B of these By-Laws. 

LIFE MEMBERSHIP 

4. In lieu of annual dues a member may elect to become a 
Life Member by making a lump-sum payment to the Lodge. 
This lump-sum payment shall be in accordance with the 
terms of Appendix A of these By-Laws. 



39 



ARTICLE XIII - ARREARS OF FEES AND DUES 

1. Any Brother who is in arrears of fees and dues after 
twelve months from the date they became due shall have his 
case dealt with by the Lodge according to the rules and 
regulations as set forth by Grand Lodge in the Book of 
Constitution. 

ARTICLE XIV - RESTORATION 

1. A Brother may be restored to good standing, providing 
his case is dealt with by the Lodge according to the rules 
and regulations as set forth by Grand Lodge in the Book of 
Constitution. 

ARTICLE XV - CORRESPONDENCE SUBSCRIBER 

Whereas the objects of this Lodge are to promulgate 
the results of its research activities to its Members in 
particular and any other Masons in good standing in the 
Jurisdiction of this Grand Lodge and those Grand Lodges 
with which we are in amity, who are desirous of the same, 
and as many of these nonmembers are unable to attend Lodge 
meetings or become members, but desire the benefit of 
historical light, it is desirable that they be given an 
opportunity to obtain the results of our Masonic researches 
To this end: 

1. Masons in good standing may request to be placed on a 
mailing list to receive copies of the published research 
activities of the Lodge. Such Masons shall be known as 
Corresponding Subscribers . 

2. A Corresponding Subscriber shall not be considered a 
member of this Lodge and may be accepted without ballot on 
application to the Lodge Secretary. 

3. A Corresponding Subscriber may attend the Regular 
Meetings of the Lodge as a visitor and with the privileges 
and responsibilities of a visitor as described in the 
Constitution of Grand Lodge. 

4. A Corresponding Subscriber is not entitled to receive 
the Summons or the business portion of the minutes of this 
Lodge. 

5. The fee for a Corresponding Subscriber shall be the 
same as the annual dues of a member, as defined in Appendix 
B of these By-Laws, and are to be paid one full year in 
advance. 

ARTICLE XVI - FINANCIAL YEAR 

1. The financial year shall terminate on the last day of 
August of each year. 



- 40 - 



ARTICLE XVII - LODGE FUNDS 

1. There shall be three funds maintained in the name of 
the Lodge, in a Chartered Bank or Trust Company as approved 
by the Lodge. The funds shall be known as (a) The Operating 
Fund, (b) The Capital Fund, and (c) The Life Membership 
Fund. All monies received by the Secretary, Treasurer, or 
any other person on behalf of the Lodge, shall be deposited 
forthwith to the credit of the Lodge in the appropriate 
account. The Treasurer shall review the funds from time 

to time, and shall recommend to the Committee of General 
Purposes transfer from one account to another as he deems 
desirable. The signing officers for the Lodge shall be 
the Worshipful Master, the Secretary and the Treasurer, 
any two of whom may sign. 

THE OPERATING FUND 

2. The Operating Fund shall be maintained by annual dues 
collected from members. From this fund shall be paid the 
normal expenses of the Lodge; such as Grand Lodge dues, 
District tax, rent, printing, postage, etc. Expenditures 
will be controlled through a budget set up annually by 
the Committee of General Purposes and presented to the 
Lodge for approval at the Regular Meeting in November of 
each year. 

THE CAPITAL FUND 

3. The Capital Fund, initially established by the Charter 
Membership fees, shall be augmented by Initiation and 
Affiliation fees as received, and by bequests and other 
monies specially dedicated to it. The Fund shall be 
invested in Charter Bank or Trust Company Certificates or 
similar securities. 

4. When the cash balance in the Capital Fund is sufficient 
to warrant further investment, the Treasurer shall report 
the fact to the Committee of General Purposes, who may 
recommend to the Lodge that such investment be made. If 
the recommendation is approved, the Lodge shall authorize 
the Treasurer to invest a specific sum in suitable securities 
The purchase of such securities shall be made by cheque. 

5. Under normal circumstances the principal sum in the 
Capital Fund shall not be disturbed, but the income from 
the investments held by the fund, may be applied to the 
acquisition of masonic artifacts, memorabilia, documents, 
and other items of historical value, by resolution of the 
Lodge. At a suitable time in the future and by a resolu- 
tion of the Lodge, the interest and a substantial amount 
of the principal may be used for the purchase of suitable 
facilities for the development of a Masonic Museum. 



- 41 



LIFE MEMBERSHIP FUND 

6. All monies received in payment of Life Memberships 
shall be deposited in a separate account, and invested 
from time to time in Chartered Bank or Trust Company 
Certificates, or similar securities. 

7. The Fund shall be administered by the Committee of 
General Purposes, which shall ensure that the interest 
from the invested sum is transferred to the Operating Fund 
from time to time, and that no encroachment on the principal 
amount shall take place except in accordance with the terms 
of Appendix A of these By-Laws. 

ARTICLE XVIII - VISITORS 

1. No visitor shall be admitted into the Lodge, unless he 
is personally vouched for, or after due examination by one 
or more members present, nor unless he shall have entered 
his name, Masonic Rank, the name of his mother lodge or the 
lodge from which he hails, in a book to be kept by the Lodge 
for that purpose; and during his continuance in the Lodge 
he shall be subjected to its By-Laws. 

ARTICLE XIX - CONTINGENCIES 

1. Should any contingency arise which is not provided for 
in these By-Laws, the Lodge shall be guided in its action 
by Ancient Masonic usage, and the Constitution of the Grand 
Lodge of Canada in the Province of Ontario. 

ARTICLE XX - ALTERATIONS TO THE BY-LAWS 

1. No additions, alterations or amendments shall be made 
to these By-Laws except by notice of motion given at a 
Regular Meeting, entered in the minutes and printed in the 
summons for the next REgular Meeting, at which time the 
motion being duly moved and seconded and supported by at 
least two-thirds of the votes then present, the proposed 
amendment shall be submitted to the Grand Master, and upon 
his approval, the amendment shall be effective, of which 
every Member shall receive notice, and all unissued copies 
of the By-Laws shall be so amended. 

ARTICLE XXI - SIGNING OF BY-LAWS 

1. These By-Laws, when incorporated in the Lodge Register, 
shall be signed by the Worshipful Master and Secretary, 
and have the seal of the Lodge affixed. Every Brother is 
also to sign them as a declaration of submission thereto, 
and one copy shall be delivered to each Member without 
charge upon initiation or affiliation. 



42 



ARTICLE XXII - COMMUNICATIONS 

1. This Lodge, after initial contact through the office 
of the Grand Secretary, shall endeavour to communicate with 
other Masonic Research or Historical Lodges, Associations 
or Societies with similar objectives with the object of 
exchanging published information and other masonic papers, 
documents, manuscripts or reproductions for the mutual 
benefit of all participants. 

SCRUTINEERS 
(Not an officer) 

18. The Worshipful Master shall, on the occasion of the 
Election of Officers, appoint three brethren as Scrutineers 
of the Ballot. They shall examine the ballots, and report 
the results of the ballot. Immediately after the election 
of an officer has been declared by the Worshipful Master, 
the used ballots for such election shall be destroyed. 

EDITOR 
(Not an officer) 

20. The Editor shall be responsible for collecting and 
receiving all material to be published in the Lodge Pro- 
ceedings. Minutes of Lodge Meetings shall be provided by 
the Lodge Secretary and copies of reports of Standing and 
Appointed Committees shall be provided by Committee Chairmen 
He shall have authority to edit all material for publication 
in accordance with the approved editorial policy as defined 
in Appendix D of the Lodge By-Laws. 

The Editor shall arrange for typing and prepara- 
tion of the final manuscript for printing or reproduction 
in the accepted format, and arrange for delivery to the 
Lodge Secretary sufficient copies for distribution to the 
'Lodge Membership 1 , 'Corresponding Subscribers' and others 
approved by the Lodge. 

He shall also arrange to have at least 50 copies of 
collected Lodge Proceedings bound in similar quality and 
workmanship as the first bound copy Vol. 1 - Vol. 5, at 
suitable intervals. 

He shall be exempt from payment of all lodge dues 
during his term of office, and shall be paid such honorarium 
as the Lodge may by resolution from time to time direct. 



- 43 - 

APPENDIX A 

ADMINISTRATION OF A LIFE MEMBERSHIP PLAN 

FOR THE HERITAGE LODGE NO. 73 

General 

Basically, the concept of Life Membership is very 
simple. In lieu of annual dues, the Life Member pays to the 
Lodge one lump-sum which thereafter exempts him from any 
further payments during his lifetime. Out of this lump-sum 
the Lodge pays any incidental expenses and invests the 
remainder in interest bearing securities, the income from 
which pays, in effect, annual dues on his behalf. 

In a self-sustaining plan the amount to be invested 
is determined by the following formula: 

100 M 
F I 

where P = principal amount to be invested 

M = annual dues or annual operating expense per member 
I = prevailing or expected real (i.e. the difference 
between actual interest and rate of inflation) 
interest rate, or return on the investment, in 
percent. 

Life Membership Fee 

The current annual dues for this Lodge (1982) are 
$15.00 payable in advance, and the required principal amount 
is therefore: 

P = ■ 100 1 « 15 - 00 ■ $150.00 

assuming an expected interest rate of 10%. To this amount 
must be added the incidental expenses, which in this Lodge 
are: 

Grand Lodge commutation fee $25.00 

Affiliation fee (to Capital Fund) 15.00 

First year's dues in advance 15. 00 

Total expenses $55.00 

Therefore, the total cost of a Life Membership in 
The Heritage Lodge No. 730, in 1982 is: 

$150.00 plus $55.00 = $205.00. 



44 - 



Administration 

1. Interest earned by the invested amount shall be deposited 
in the Life Membership Account as received. The income only 
from this account shall be transferred to the Operating 
Account as required. This shall be done by cheque or 
equivalent means, signed by the regular signing officers 

of the Lodge. 

2. Except as required for investment as described in 
ARTICLE XVII, paragraphs 7 and 8, no portion of the princi- 
pal amount of the Life Membership Fund shall be withdrawn 
without a notice of the proposed withdrawal having been 
given in a Lodge Summons and without a 2/3 majority vote 

of the members present and voting at the next Regular Meeting 
of the Lodge. 

3. No fee, in whole or in part, may be returned to a 
brother or to his estate for any reason, including demission, 
suspension, explusion or death. 

4. The Life Membership Fund shall be monitored regularly 
by the Committee of General Purposes. If at any time the 
annual dues of the Lodge or the annual operating expenses 
are changed, the Life Membership fee charged to subsequently 
joining members shall be altered accordingly. 

5. All bonds, certificates and other securities relating 
to the Life Membership Fund shall be kept in a safe deposit 
box approved by the Lodge, and shall be made available to 
the auditors at any time with due notice. 

6. The Committee of General Purposes shall have power to 
authorize the purchase of investments at any time on behalf 
of the Lodge, and to have their actions ratified at the 
next Regular Meeting of the Lodge. 



- 45 - 

APPENDIX B 
INITIATION, AFFILIATION AND ANNUAL FEES 

1. The fee for Initiation shall be $10,000.00, which shall 
include the Grand Lodge Fee for registration and Certifi- 
cate, and a Master Mason's apron. 

2. The fee for Affiliation shall be $15.00 payable in 
advance. 

3. The Annual fee shall be $15.00, due September 1st for 
the current year. Members are requested to pay the annual 
fee in advance. For newly affiliated masons, the initial 
fee shall be pro-rated on the basis of $1.50 for each month 
remaining from the date of membership into the Lodge until 
the following September 1st, to a maximum of $15.00. 

4. The fee for Corresponding Subscriber shall be $15.00, 
payable in advance. 



- 46 - 

APPENDIX C 

THE MASONIC HERITAGE CORPORATION 

The Masonic Heritage Corporation shall be the legal 
component of the Lodge. It provides the vehicle for legal 
transactions to permit The Heritage Lodge to carry out its 
objectives as outlined in these By-Laws. The objects for 
which the Corporation is incorporated are as follows: 

To promote the study, research, knowledge and preser- 
vation of the heritage of the Masonic Order in the Province 
of Ontario, and in furtherance of the foregoing: 

a) subject to the consent of the Grand Lodge A.F.&A.M. 
of Canada in the Province of Ontario, to enter into any 
arrangements with any authoriy, municipal, local or other- 
wise that seem conducive to the corporation's objects or 
any of them and to obtain from an authority any rights, 
privileges and concessions; 

b) to create, acquire, buy, lease or otherwise possess, 
establish, hold and operate adequate and convenient property 
and premises to provide a Historic Masonic Temple and other 
conveniences for the members of the Masonic Order and to 
equip, furnish and maintain the same; 

c) to accept donations, gifts, legacies and bequests 
provided such donations, gifts, legacies or bequests 
originate with Masonic Bodies duly recognized by the Grand 
Lodge A.F.&A.M. of Canada in the Province of Ontario; 

d) to raise funds by sale of debentures to members of 
the Masonic Order and to borrow moneys by mortgage loan or 
otherwise; 

e) to do all such other things as are incidental or 
conductive to the attainment of the objects herein contained, 

Special provisions 

The Corporation shall be carried on without the purpose 
of gain or profit for its members, and any profits or other 
accretions to the Corporation shall be used in promoting 
its objects. 

The membership in the Corporation shall be limited to 
those who are members of The Heritage Lodge, A.F.&.A.M., No. 
730, on the register of the Grand Lodge A.F.&.A.M. of 
Canada in the Province of Ontario. The required number of 
members for The Masonic Heritage Corporation shall be 
elected annually at the Regular Meeting of the Lodge in 
September by open vote. 

Upon the dissolution of the Corporation, any assets 
remaining after the payment and satisfaction of the debts 



- 47 



and liabilities shall be transferred to either a successor 
in purpose and objectives or, failing that, to the chief 
Masonic fund or corporation under the jurisdiction of or 
sponsored by the Grand Lodge A.F.&.A.M. of Canada in the 
Province of Ontario that is exclusively charitable in 
purpose or objective. 



- 48 



APPENDIX D 

EDITORIAL POLICY 

The Editorial Policy shall be the responsibility of 
the Editorial Board, who will establish and maintain, 
subject to the approval of the Lodge, editorial policy for 
Lodge publications. 

LODGE PROCEEDINGS 

Material published in the Lodge Proceedings shall 
be the responsibility of the Editor, who shall be a member 
of the Editorial Board. Each issue of the Lodge Proceed- 
ings shall indicate that "The opinions expressed by the 
authors, reviewers and other participants relating to the 
discussion of papers presented in the Lodge Proceedings are 
not necessarily those of The Heritage Lodge." 

Papers and reviews presented at any meeting of The 
Heritage Lodge or accepted for publication in the Lodge 
Proceedings are considered to be the property of The Heritage 
Lodge. In general, The Heritage Lodge reserves the right 
of first publication of such papers or reviews, in complete 
form. However, it has no objection to publication in 
complete form or condensed form, providing suitable credit 
is given to The Heritage Lodge and the Author showing 
complete title and name of author/s and giving Volume and 
Number of Lodge Proceedings from which the material was 
used. 

OTHER LODGE PUBLICATIONS 

Other material published by the Lodge shall be submitted 
to the Editorial Board for review and recommendation to 
the Lodge for approval. 



49 



COMING EVENTS 

January 17, 1983 (Monday) - Special Communication of the 
Western New York Lodge of Research U.D. This Lodge of 
Research was Instituted on October 21, 1982 by the 
Grand Lodge of New York, F.&A.M. with W.Bro. Alan G. 
Fowler as Worshipful Master. Brother Fowler has been 
in receipt of our Lodge Proceedings and attended out 
Installation Ceremonies last November accompanied by 
a delegation of Masons from Buffalo. They also plan 
to attend our Meeting on March 2nd in Toronto. Their 
meeting of January 17th, will be held in the Buffalo 
Consistory, 383 Calvin Ave., Buffalo at 7:30 p.m. 
Cars will be leaving Toronto and Guelph early Monday 
evening. Those who are interested in attending contact 
Balfour LeGresley in Toronto or Jack Pos in Guelph. 
Perhaps our Brethren in the Niagara Peninsula could get 
a car load together as well. 

February 16, 1983 (Wednesday) - General Purpose Committee 

Meeting of The Heritage Lodge will be held in the Preston- 
Hespeler Masonic Temple at 7:30 p.m. Three Special 
Task Force Groups and all Standing and Appointed 
Committees are expected to present written reports. 
The 'Proposed New Lodge By-Laws' will be discussed at 
this time for submission for approval by the Lodge at 
the Regular Meeting in March. 

March 2, 1983 (Wednesday) - Twenty-Sixty Regular Meeting 
of The Heritage Lodge will be held in the Davenport 
Masonic Temple, 888 Yonge Street, Toronto, Ontario at 
7:00 p.m. The meeting will be hosted by Toronto District 
7. M. W.Bro. Eric W. Nancekivell, M.D., P.G.M., will 
present a paper titled "The Commission on Information 
for Recognition of the Conference of Grand Masters of 
Masons of North America". 

May 18, 1983 (Wednesday) - Twenty-Seventh Regular Meeting 
of The Heritage Lodge will be held in the Preston- 
Hespeler Masonic Temple at 7:30 p.m. The program for 
this meeting is being jointly organized by R.W.Bros. 
Frank Bruce and Ed Ralph, and will feature a number of 
mini-papers on interesting topics by senior masons. 
Also, a special recognition ceremony is being planned 
by R.W.Bro§. Joel Piper and Jack Pos for the special 
gavels that were made from wood taken from a table which 
belonged to our First Grand Master as recorded on page 
161 of the book of the same title written by R. W.Bro. 
Bruce M. Pearce, 1932. Approximately seven of these 
gavels have been located in different Lodges in Wilson 
and Hamilton A Districts. 

September 21, 1983 (Wednesday) - Twenty-Eighth Regular 
Meeting of The Heritage Lodge will be held in the 
Preston-Hespeler Masonic Temple at 7:30 p.m. On this 



50 



occasion we will have the unique privilege of having, 
the Worshipful Master of Quatuor Coronati Lodge No. 
2076, London, England, our own R.W.Bro. Wallace E. 
McLeod who will present a sequel to his first paper on 
'The Old Charges'. This is also our Annual Election 
of Lodge Officers. 

November 16, 1983 (Wednesday) - Twenty-Ninth Regular Meeting 
of The Heritage Lodge will be held in the Preston- 
Hespeler Masonic Temple at 7:30 p.m. Installation of 
the Worshipful Master and Investiture of the Lodge 
Officers. This is also the customary Official Visit 
of the D.D.G.M. of Waterloo District. 

FROM THE SECRETARY'S DESK 

LODGE DUES 

A large number of members are not submitting their 
annual dues before the first of September (beginning of 
Lodge fiscal year) . Since it is important that our cash 
flow is sufficient to cover the operating expenses of the 
Lodge, we implore each of you to examine the mailing 
envelope carefully and if a statement is enclosed please 
check the amount and send your remittance as soon as 
possible; otherwise it may be necessary to increase the 
annual dues of the Lodge. If a statement is not enclosed, 
then you should find your Membership card indicating that 
you are a member in good standing for 1983. 

SUBSTITUTE WARRANT 

In the next few weeks, Secretaries of Constitutent 
Lodges, at the request of the D.D.G.M., will be bringing 
to the attention of the members of the lodge the subject 
of a Substitute Warrant. This is in part the result of a 
request by The Heritage Lodge to the Grand Lodge for 
permission to use a 'Travelling Warrant' since some of 
our Regular Meetings take place in different lodge rooms 
throughout the Province and there is always the danger of 
loosing our original warrant in an accident or some other 
cause as the precious parchment in its large glass and 
wood frame is transported in the trunk of private vehicles 
several times each year. The matter was turned over to the 
Committee on Warrants. 

It is also important that non-nomadic lodges may wish 
to protect their original warrant from theft, vandalism 
or fire by keeping it in a fire safe and protected environ- 
ment and that an official 'Substitute Warrant 1 be authorized 
for use and display at Regular Lodge Meetings. 

Therefore, we hope that you will promote and wherever 
possible speak in support of the concept of a Substitute 
Warrant whenever the opportunity presents itself. 



51 



MASONIC LODGE ROOM RESTORATION PROJECT 

It is certainly gratifying that great progress is being 
made by the Three Task Forces charged with the organiza- 
tion, fund raising and expediting of the Masonic Lodge 
Room Restoration Project. 

A legal body has now been officially incorporated under 
the name of "The Masonic Heritage Corporation". A 
number of meetings of the Corporation as well as the Board 
of Directors have been held, By-Laws proposed and confirmed 
and the Corporate Seal, the design for which was approved 
at our Regular Lodge Meeting in November, has been^purchasec 
The Lodge is indeed grateful to W.Bro. Ron Qoopor for all 
his time and effort in getting the Corporate oj^formed. An 
interim agreement has been signed with the Metropolitan 
Toronto and Region Conservation Authority (MTRCA) and its 
Foundation (MTRCF) ; it is expected that official receipts 
for income tax purposes for donations received prior to 
December 31, 1982, will be available for use in filiag 
1982 tax returns. A jk — **f 

Preliminary investigations by the artisans of the 
MTRCA have uncovered a number of interesting items about 
the building. It was built sometime between 1840 and 1850. 
For the first 25 years, the second floor was used as living 
quarters. Partitions were changed and modified to provide 
a meeting place for Blackwood Lodge No. 311 from 1874-1902. 
The ceiling appears to have been of wood construction and 
there is evidence of a stove plate in the lodge room fp.r 
heating. Several layers of wallpaper indicate a variety 
of wall decorations even the possibility of tontjrffuous floor 
to ceiling drapes along sections of the walls-f^The building 
was to have been disassembled commencing in the second week 
of December, but the project was delayed in order to learn 
more about the building. The MTRCA is working very closely 
with the Expediting Task Froce in order to preserve as 
much as possible the authenticity of the original building. 

The Expediting Task Force under the Chairmanship of 
W.Bro. Alan Hogg has met on several occasions including 
one meeting at the site of the original building. Furni- 
ture and equipment requirements for the restored lodge room 
have been identified, this list will be published in a 
subsequent issue of the Lodge Proceedings. In the meantime 
every mason is requested to notify Bro. Hogg if they learn 
of any furniture or furnishings that may be available and 
suitable for our purposes. Time of manufacture must 
predate 1867. 

The H.O.M.E. Project Task Force under the active 
Chairmanship of R. W.Bro. C. Edwin Drew is progressing 
favourably with the Fund Raising Campaign. To date 



- 52 



(December 24) more than $38,500 has been received from 
about 1500 separate donations representing about $25.00 per 
donation. The 1500 donations is from less than 1 1/2% of 
our total membership and we are nearly at 40% of our target 
fiture. Therefore, in the remaining 6 months and with a 
little extra effort we should have no difficulty reaching 
the $100,000 before June 30, 1983. It would be most commend- 
able if we could report complete success in the fund raising 
campaign by the time of our Annual Communication of Grand 
Lodge in July, 1983. 

Five more slide sets complete with taped narration have 
been added to the original 7 sets and these are being 
distributed to the different District Representatives on a 
rotational basis by R.W.Bro. Ed Ralph. Lodges wishing to 
use this 17 minute colored slide presentation describing 
the Lodge Room Restoration Project should contact their 
District Representative. Their names and addresses were 
given in the last Proceedings Vol. 6, No. 1, pages 48-50. 
There are two corrections to the list. The Dist. Rep. for 
Sarnia District is V.W.Bro. Rae Emery, 32 Church St., Forest, 
Ontario M0N 1J0; and for Brant District V.W.Bro. William 
Hughes, 39 Tranquility Street, Brantford, Ontario. 

THE HERITAGE LODGE FURNISHINGS 

We are pleased to announce that we now have a separate 
cupboard in the Preston-Hespeler Masonic Temple for storage 
of Lodge Furnishings. Our furnishings include the Officer's 
Collars and Jewels which were donated by the first Officers 
of the Lodge and the 4 wands donated by Wilmot Lodge No. 318. 
We still require an Altar Bible with the Square and Compasses 
the Working Tools of each of the three degrees, and the 
gavels and wands of the two Wardens. It would be partic- 
ularly desirable if these items had a historical background. 
Perhaps the membership is aware of lodges that have 
reached their 100 anniversary and have replaced their 
original furnishings with gold plated furnishings. It is 
most appropriate that a Historical Lodge be endowed with 
historical tools and symbols. 

FUTURE PAPERS 

Please review the suggested topics on pages 45 and 46 
of Vol. 6, No. 1 of the Lodge Proceedings and let R.W.Bro. 
Frank Bruce know if you are interested in researching a paper 
for presentation in 1984. 

BOUND VOLUME OF LODGE PROCEEDINGS 

Our book binder, Bro. Turner, has advised me that he 
still has splines, cloth binding and stock for 4 more 
bindings. Therefore, gather up all your back issues of 



53 



the Lodge Proceedings and bring them along to the next 
Regular Meeting. The cost is only $15.00 and you will be 
proud of your handsome and historical collection. 

NEW ADDRESSES 

The following names and addresses should be added to 
your Lodge Mailing List: 



416. Ralph M. Brubacher 
62 Centre St. 
Elmira, Ont N3B 2V8 
Glenrose Lodge #628 
Waterloo (433) 

417. Wayne E. Elgie 
49 Skyline Dr. 
Dundas, Ont. L9H 3S3 
Ancient Landmarks #654 
Hamilton C (434) 



423. Gordon A. Gross 
37 Hinton Ave. 
Ottawa, Ont. KlY 1A7 
The Builders Lodge #177 
Ottawa Dist 2 (440) 

424. Kenneth G. Halbert 
7015 Pisley Ave. 
Niagara Falls, L2G 5C2 
Myrtle Lodge #337 
Niagara B Dist. (441) 



418. Durward I. Greenwood 
Box 189 

Grand Valley, Ont. L0N 1G0 
Scott Lodge #421 
Grey Dist. (435) 



425. Leonard Harrison 

248 Royal Orchard Blvd. 
Thornhill, L3T 3E7 
Doric Lodge #316 
Toronto Dist 3 (442) 



419. W. Earl Rawson 

Goderich, Ont. N7A 1Z1 

Maitland #33 

South Huron (43 6) 



42 6. Arthur Saxton 

2 9 Traymoor Ave. 
Kingston, Ont. K7L 4K9 
Minden Lodge #2 53 
Frontenac Dist. (443) 



420. Ford Nelson Rupert 
71 Cedar St. 

Kapuskasing, Ont. P5N 2B2 
Spruce Falls #648 
Temiskaming (437) 



427. Ronald B.S. Brown 
6360 Ash St. 
Niagara Falls L2G 2H5 
Adoniram Lodge #57 3 
Niagara Dist. B (444) 



421. Victor D. Alyea 
R.R. #2 

Hillier, Ont. K0K 2J0 
Consecon Lodge #50 
Prince Edward (438) 



428. Reginald G. Carter 
11A Hunness Rd . 
Toronto, Ont. M8W 4M2 
Anthony Sayer Lodge #640 
Toronto Dist. 1 (445) 



422. Alfred J. Bendle 
17 9 Olive Ave. 
Willowdale, Ont. M2N 4P3 
Vaughn Lodge #54 
Toronto Dist 7 (439) 



429. Bruce M. Grimbleby 

58 Scarborough Heights 
Scarborough M1M 2V4 
John Ross Robertson #545 
Toronto Dist. 4 (446) 



- 54 



430. Stephen Harvey Maizels 
4454 Bathurst St. 
Downsview, Ont. M3H 3S2 
Palestine Lodge #559 
Toronto Dist. 7 (447) 



439. Norman Lacasse 

604 Thede Dr. Box 1120 
Port Elgin, Ont. NOH 2C0 
St. Lawrence Lodge #131 
Bruce Dist. (456) 



431. Richard Charles Slee 
3 Dartmouth Cresc. 
Toronto, Ont. M8V 1W9 
Anthony Sayer Lodge #64 
Toronto Dist. 1 (448) 

432. George E. Appleyard 
321 W. 2nd St. 
Hamilton, Ont. L9C 3H3 
The Barton Lodge #6 
Hamilton A Dist. (449) 

433. Robert W.D. Wilson 
Box 146 

Massey, Ont. POP IPO 
Espanola Lodge #527 
Sudbury-Manitoulin (450) 

434. Edward M. Jaques 
618 Main St. 

Port Dover, Ont. N0A 1N0 

Erie Lodge #149 

Wilson Dist. (451) 



440. Frank Richardson 

437 Thede Dr., Box 987 
Port Elgin, Ont. NOH 2C0 
Port Elgin Lodge #429 
Bruce Dist. (457) 



NEW NOTICE: 

A Special Education 
Meeting, Re: the Lodge Room 
Restoration Program (H.O.M.E 
Project) has been organized 
by Toronto District 6 to be 
held Tuesday Evening, Feb- 
ruary 1st, 1983, at 8:00 p. 
m. in the York Temple, 
1100 Millwood Rd., Toronto. 
Special Speakers include 
R.W.Bros. Wallace McLeod 
and Ed Drew. All Masons are 
encouraged to attend. 



435. Thomas Roy Davies 
784 Gladstone Dr. 
Woodstock, Ont. N4S 5T2 
King Solomon Lodge #43 
Wilson Dist. (452) 

436. Warren 0. Mulack 
119 Hyland Dr. 
Sudbury, Ont. P3E 1R7 
Espanola Lodge #527 
Sudbury-Manitoulin (453) 

437. William J. Searson 
P.O. Box 

Ayr, Ont. NOB 1E0 
Ayr Lodge #172 
Waterloo Dist. (454) 

438. Victor Govan 

81 Tarbart Terrace 
London, Ont. N6H 3B1 
Corinthian Lodge #330 
London West Dist. (455) 






- 55 - 

REPORT ON QUATUOR CORONATI LODGE INSTALLATION 

One of the basic purposes in the formation of "The 
Heritage Lodge No. 730" was to discover, recognize and record 
historic moments and events in the Masonic life of our 
Jurisdiction. 

On Thursday, November 11th, 1982, such an event took 
place in London, England, which should find a permanent 
place in our records. On this date it must be recorded that 
R.W.Bro. Wallace E. McLeod, a Charter Member of The Heritage 
Lodge, and a frequent contributor of significant research 
papers to its Proceedings, was not only the first Canadian, 
but also the first North American, to be installed as 
WORSHIPFUL MASTER of the QUATUOR CORONATI LODGE NO. 20 76. 
The ceremony took place before a crowded assembly of disting- 
uished Masons of world-wide representation in Lodge Room #9 
of the magnificent "Freemason's Hall", on Great Queen Street, 
London, England. 

Quatuor Coronati Lodge was established in 1886, "for 
the purpose of studying the History, Symbols, and Legends of 
Freemasonry". Many of those in attendance are members of its 
"Correspondence Circle", established in 1887 . 

While the "Ceremony of Installation" was similar in 
content to that used in our Craft Lodges, it was very diffe- 
rent in its execution for, rather than involving 25 or so 
participants, the whole Ceremony was conducted - in a flaw- 
less manner - by the retiring Worshipful Master. It might 
also be stated that the Master-Elect was equally flawless in 
his role! All in all, it was an impressive and memorable 
experience. 

Prior to the 5:00 p.m. meeting, tours were available of 
the magnificent building, and following the Ceremony a 
reception and dinner were enjoyed by our LADIES, as well as 
the assembled Brethren. Some 240 persons shared in the dinner 
and Toast List - all conducted with typical English decorum 
and aplomb. 

The new Worshipful Master was overwhelmed by the fact 
that some 44 of his beloved Brethren from the Grand Lodge of 
Canada, in the Province of Ontario (accompanied by wives, of 
course) had made the journey to London in his support. These 
brethren represented the whole of the Province, from Kapus- 
kasing in the North, Ottawa in the East, Windsor in the West, 
and all points in between. 

To have been a part of this experience; to have assisted 
in organizing the Canadian delegation; and to have had the 
priviledge of responding to "The Toast to the Visitors" - 
thereby speaking for the whole world-wide assembly on this 
historic occasion - was one of the greatest Masonic thrills 
of my career, and I take pleasure in submitting this report 
for the records of The Heritage Lodge Lodge. 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. Gray Rivers 

D.D.G.M., Waterloo District. 



- 56 - 

GRAND LODGE OFFICERS (1982 - 1983) 

THE MOST WORSHIPFUL THE GRAND MASTER 

M.W.Bro. Howard 0. Polk 

892 Aaron Ave., Ottawa, K2A 3P3 

THE DEPUTY GRAND MASTER 
R.W.Bro. Ronald E. Groshaw 
31 Princess Margaret Blvd., Islington, M9A 1Z5 

THE GRAND SECRETARY 
M.W.Bro. Root. E. Davies 
Drawer 21 7, Hamilton, L8N 3C9 

DISTRICT DEPUTY GRAND MASTER, WATERLOO DISTRICT 
R.W.Bro. Rev. W. Gray Rivers 
8 Kirby Ave., Dundas, L9H 5K9 
* * « 

LODGE OFFICERS (1982 - 1983) 

Worshipful Master, R.W.Bro. Balfour LeGresley 

Immediate Past Master,.. W.Bro. George E. Zwicker 

Senior Warden, R.W.Bro. David C. Bradley 

Junior Warden, R.W.Bro. C. Edwin Drew 

Chaplain, R.W.Bro. Arthur Watson 

Treasurer, R .W.Bro. Gary J. Powell 

Secretary, R.W.Bro. Jacob (Jack) Pos 

Assistant Secretary, . . . W.Bro. George Moore 

Senior Deacon, R.W.Bro. Robert S. Throop 

Junior Deacon W.Bro. Albert Barker 

Director of Ceremonies,. R.W.Bro. Aage Bjerknes 

Inner Guard R.W.Bro. Edsel C. Steen 

Tyler, V.W.Bro. Wilfred Greenhough 

Senior Steward, R.W.Bro. Edmond V. Ralph 

Junior Steward, W.Bro. Donald B. Kaufman 

Organi st , R . W . Bro . Len Hertel 

Historian, W.Bro. Allan J. Cohoe 

Archivist, W.Bro. Glen T. Jones 

CHAIRMEN, LODGE COMMITTEES (1982 - 1983) 

GENERAL PURPOSES, R.W.Bro. David Bradley (SW). 
MEMBERSHIP & UNATTACHED MASONS, R.W.Bro. Ed. Ralph. 
REFRESHMENT & ENTERTAINMENT, R.W.Bro. Ed. Ralph (SS) . 
MASONIC INFORMATION, R.W.Bro. Frank J. Bruce. 
CENTRAL DATA BANK, W.Bro. F. James M. Major. 
MASONIC MUSEUM, R.W.Bro. Jack Pos 
LODGE LIBRARY, W.Bro. Donald Cosens. 
LODGE PUBLICATIONS, R.W.Bro. Clifford Baxter. 
FINANCE & BY-LAWS, R.W.Bro. W. Ed. Wilson. 
FREEMASON EDITOR, W.Bro. Gregory Robinson. 
EDITORIAL BOARD, R.W.Bros. W.E. McLeod, F.J. Bruce, 

and J. Pos. 

note: The duties of all Lodge Officers, Lodge Committees 
and Appointed Positions are defined in the Lodge 
By-Laws, ARTICLES V to VIII. 



$roceebmgs( 

K\)t Heritage Hobge MoJZO 



INSTITUTED 

Sept. 21, 1977 

WORSHIPFUL MASTER 

R.W.Bro. B. LeGresley 
213 Riverside Dr. , 
Toronto, Ontario, 
M6S 4A8 




CONSTITUTED 

Sept. 23, 1978 

SECY & EDITOR 

R.W.Bro. J. Pos 
10 Mayfield Ave. 
Guelph, Ontario, 
NIG 2L8 



Res. (416) 76 


9 3804 




Res. 
Bus. 


(519) 821 4995 
(519) 824 4120 


Vol.6, No. 3 


Cambridge, 


Ontario, 


Canada 


March I983 



Please Note : 

The opinions expressed by the authors, reviewers 
and other participants in the papers and discussions in- 
cluded in these Proceedings are not necessarily those of 
The Heritage Lodge. 



SUMMONS 

Dear Sirs and Brethren: 

By order of the Worshipful Master, R.W.Bro. Balfour 
LeGresley, you are hereby summoned to attend the Twenty- 
Seventh Regular Meeting of The Heritage Lodge No. 730, to 
be held in the Preston-Hespeler Masonic Temple, Cambridge, 
located at the North-East corner of the intersection of 
Highways 401 and 24 on:- 

WEDNESDAY EVENING, MAY 18th, 1983. at 7Q0 p.m. 

prompt for the purpose of introducing and transacting such 
business as may be regularly brought before the Lodge. An 
important item of business is the proposed changes to the 
Lodge By-Laws. Please review the recommended amendments as 
outlined on pages 26 to 29 of these proceedings. 

On this occasion, we will be priviledged to have as 
Special Speakers: W.Bro. Art Andrew, R.W.Bro. Jack Dargavel, 
R.W.Bro. Joel Piper, W.Bro. Ted Jacques and our program 
coordinators R.W.Bros. Ed Ralph and Frank Bruce. See pages 
29 and 30 of these proceedings for the agenda. 

Favourable reports having been received on the 
applications for affiliation, as presented at the Regular 
Meeting on March 2nd, 1983, the Worshipful Master has 
declared that a Ballot will be taken at this meeting for 



the following Brethren: 

R.W.Bros. Jack Moore, Ainsley Roseborough, and Harold 
F. Whitmore; W.Bros. Garry E. Bulmer, John R. Castle, George 
A. Heels, Kenneth A. Hunter, John M. Robinson, Alan C. 
Snider, Sam Sniderman, and Samuel J. Wilson; and Bros. Howard 
J. Alpert, Warren R. Covent, Robert French, Brian J. Moorse, 
John E.H. Rognvaldson, and Donald M. Smith; for full details, 
see pages 6 and 7 of these proceedings. 



GENERAL PURPOSE COMMITTEE 

I am directed by R.W.Bro. David C. Bradley, Chairman 
of the Committee on General Purposes to announce that the 
next meeting of the Committee will be held in the Preston- 
Hespeler Masonic Temple on:- 

WEDNESDAY EVENING, APRIL 20th, 1983, at 7 j 30 p.m. 

sharp for the purpose of transacting and discussing Lodge 
Business. 

All Lodge Officers and Chairmen of Standing and 
Appointed Committees are urgently requested to attend; all 
other Members are particularly welcome. Every Chairman or 
his designate is reminded that he is expected to present a 
written report, or send you report directly to the Secretary 
of the General Purpose Committee, W.Bro. George Moore, 
R.R. #1, Limehouse, Ontario. As a number of important issues 
that concern the future of the Lodge are to be discussed at 
this meeting, the Senior Warden is anxious that a goodly 
number of Brethren will be present. 

Sincerely and fraternally 
R.W.Bro. Jack Pos, Sec 'y 



TWENTY-SIXTH REGULAR MEETING 

The Twenty-Sixth Regular Meeting of The Heritage Lodge 
No. 730, G.R.C., was held in the Davenport Masonic Temple, 
888 Yonge St., Toronto, Ontario, Wednesday, March 2, 1983, 
with 14 Officers, 79 Other Members and 75 Visitors for a total 
of 168 Masons as per Lodge Register. 

OPEN THE LODGE 

The Lodge was opened in the First Degree at 7:05 p.m. 
by R.W.Bro. Balfour LeGresley, W.M. , who extended a sincere 
welcome to all the Brethren present. 

CONFIRMING LODGE MINUTES 

It was regularly moved by R.W.Bro. Bradley and seconded 
by R.W.Bro. Drew, that the minutes of the Twenty-Fifth Regular 
Meeting of the Lodge, held in the Preston-Hespeler Masonic 
Temple, Cambridge, November 17, 1982, which were printed in 
the Lodge Proceedings, Vol. 6, No. 2, and distributed to all 
the members of the Lodge, be accepted as circulated. Carried. 

COMMITTEE REPORTS 

1. General Purpose Committee, R.W.Bro. David C. Bradley, 
Chairman, presented a report of the Meeting held at Cambridge 
on February 16, 1983. 

"The Worshipful Master appointed a Committee comprising 
R.W.Bro. Charles A. Sankey, R.W.Bro. Wm. A.H. Lowe and W.Bro. Stew- 
art Graevette to inquire into the request for reinstatement 
from a suspended brother. 

The following accounts were discussed and recommended to 
the Lodge for payment, they cover the period from November 
17, 1982 to March 2, 1983: 

Secretary's account 

Instant Print 

Typing Nov. proceedings 

Printing Nov. proceedings 

Dominion Regalia 

Turner Bookbinding 

Grand Lodge Returns 

Lodge Rent 

TOTAL 



It was reported that the Lodge Secretary, R.W.Bro. J. Pos, 
will be on a sabbatical leave commencing September 1st, 1983, 
and concluding in the summer of 1984. R.W.Bro. Rev. Gray 
Rivers has kindly offered to act as Secretary during that time. 
The Committee recommends that the Lodge accept the offer. 



$ 


529.14 




45.31 




72.00 




753.84 




207.90 




25.00 




630.00 




383.00 


$2 


,646.19 



- 4 



The H.O.M.E. Project, reported that a total of $53,916 
has been received. The total to date is over $60,000. The 
building has been dismantled and is in storage at Black Creek 
Pioneer Village. The foundation work should begin in the 
spring and the building completed within three months of that 
date. R.W.Bros. E.C. Steen and R.S. Throop were appointed 
to arrange for the 'foundation stone laying' ceremony. The 
suggested date was August 27, 1983, with other choices being 
September 10 or 11, 1983 (confirmed for Oct. 1, 1983). 

The Publications Committee reported that W.Bro. R. Marshall 
will act as Editor for the reprinting of selected papers of 
the Canadian Masonic Research Association. 

The Proposed By-Laws were discussed at length and it 
was decided that, because of the numerous and serious amend- 
ments put forward, the proposed by-laws would be referred back 
to the By-Laws Committee for review and to come forward with 
an amended set of By-Laws that would reflect the concerns of 
the membership. 

Several other matters came before the Committee for 
discussion and are now presented as information to the members. 

The Membership Committee reported that the original 
objective of 4 00 members had been exceeded. The questionnaire, 
prepared by the Lodge Historian has been sent to 93 Charter 
Members, only 17 have replied. He would like to receive 
replies from many more charter members. 

More papers are required for presentation at our Regular 
Meetings. If any member knows of anyone who could prepare a 
paper, he is asked to inform R. W.Bro. Frank J. Bruce. It 
was also suggested that each officer present should present 
a paper, perhaps in the S.D. year. 

The Worshipful Master recommended that the Committee of 
General Purposes should assume its proper function, that is 
of discussing the business of the Lodge, and making recommen- 
dations to be presented to the Lodge for the members to vote 
upon. For this purpose, reports are needed for all Committee 
Chairman. The Worshipful Master was indeed pleased with the 
number of reports received at the last General Purpose 
Committee Meeting. By following this procedure, the length 
of the business portion of the Regular Meeting of the Lodge 
should be reduced considerably. 

R. W.Bro. D.C. Bradley, 
Chairman. 



It was regularly moved by R.W.Bro. Bradley, seconded by 
R. W.Bro. Drew that the Report of the Committee of General 
Purposes be received and adopted. Carried. 






PASSING ACCOUNTS 

It was regularly moved by R.W.Bro. Bradley, seconded by 
R.W.Bro. Drew that the accounts amounting to $2,646.19 for 
the period from Nov. 17, 1982 to March 2, 1983, as presented 
in the Report of the Committee of General Purposes be paid. 
Carried. 

NOTICE OF MOTION - RE LODGE BY-LAWS 

I hereby give notice that at the next Regular Meeting 
of The Heritage Lodge, I will move or cause to be moved that 
the proposed By-Laws of this Lodge as published in the Lodge 
Proceedings Nol. 6, No. 2, Nov. 1982, and amended as necessary 
as a result of several submissions requesting consideration of 
several changes (see pages 2 6-29) , be now approved. 

R.W.Bro. W.E. Wilson, 
Chairman By-Laws Committee. 

LODGE SECRETARY 

The following is a summary of the Report of the Committee 
of Inquiry relative to the request for reinstatement and 
demission for W.Bro. Thomas A. Silagy of St. Catharines: 

1. That W.Bro. Silagy be reinstated to good standing in 
The Heritage Lodge No. 730, subject to payment of 
dues owing ($25.00). 

2. That W.Bro. Silagy will transmit his cheque payable 
to The Heritage Lodge. It being understood that 
this cheque will be cashed subject to approval of 

his reinstatement by the Lodge, but otherwise returned 
to him should his request for reinstatement be denied. 

3. That W.Bro. Silagy' s previous request (by letter of 
Jan. 15, 1982) for a demit from The Heritage Lodge 
be granted, subject to and effective when, being 
restored to good standing. Signatures by Charles A. 
Sankey, W.A.H. Lowe and H. Stewart Greavette. 

NOTICE OF MOTION - RE W.BRO. THOMAS A SILAGY 

I hereby give notice that at the next Regular Meeting 
of The Heritage Lodge No. 730, I will move or cause to be 
moved that W.Bro. Thomas A. Silagy be reinstated to good 
standing in The Heritage Lodge No. 730, G.R.C., in accordance 
with Section 203(a) of the Constitution and subject to payment 
of dues owing ($25.00) plus the current year dues ($15.00) for 
a total payment of ($40.00) and in conformity with the 
recommendations of the Committee of Inquiry. 

R.W.Bro. J. Pos, 
Secretary. 



RECEIVING PETITIONS 

Applications for membership by affiliation were received 
from the following: 

1. CASSELMAN, Robert Carl, P.D.D.G.M.; 11 Hughes Road, 
Orillia; Age 56; Supervisor Ontario Hydro; member of 
Twin Lakes Lodge No. 718, G.R.C.; recommended by V.W.Bro. 
Laurie Brandridge and R.W.Bro. Frank Bruce. 

2. MOORE, Jack, D.D.G.M.; 9 Knighton Drive, Toronto; Age 
52; Chartered Accountant; member of Stevenson Lodge No. 
218, G.R.C.; recommended by R.W.Bro. Ed Drew and R.W.Bro. 
David Bradley. 

3. ROSEBOROUGH, Ainsley, R.W.Bro.; 65 St. Brendan St., 
Sudbury; Age 70; Retired; member of Nickel Lodge No. 427, 
G.R.C.; recommended by R.W.Bro. Walter Schaefer and V.W. 
Bro. F.S. Foote. 

4. WHITMORE, Harold Franklin; 43 Skyland Dr., Hamilton; 
Age 58; Retired; member of Temple Lodge No. 324; 
recommended by R.W.Bro. A.N. Newell and R.W.Bro. R.S. 
Throop. 

5. BULMER, Garry Edward, P.M.; 814 Mohawk Rd. W. , Hamilton; 
Age 36; Peace Officer; member of Dufferin Lodge No. 291, 
G.R.C.; recommended by W.Bro. David S. Amis and R.W.Bro. 
J. Pos. 

6. HEELS, George Ansley, W.M. ; 29 Doverwood Court, Willowdale 
Age 51; Buyer, City of North York; member of Simcoe Lodge 
No. 644, G.R.C.; recommended by W.Bro. George Blackie 

and W.Bro. Allan Hogg. 

7. ROBINSON, John Milton, P.M.; 9 Sandhill Dr., Rexdale; 
Age 55; Salesman; member of Delta Lodge No. 634, G.R.C.; 
recommended by W.Bro. K.C. McLellan and W.Bro. H.G. 
Aggett. 

8. WILSON, Samuel J., P.M.; 220 Spruce St. Box 146, Massey; 
Age 50; Warehouse Mgr. ; member of Espanola Lodge No. 
527, G.R.C.; recommended by W.Bro. T.J. Thorn and R.W. 
Bro. W.O. Mulack. 

9. FRENCH, Robert, M.M. ; 3661 The Credit Woodlands, Mississ- 
auga; Age 49; President; member of Westgate Lodge No. 
734, G.R.C.; recommended by W.Bro. W.T. Boratynec and 
W.Bro. R.J. Varley. 

10. MOORSE, Brian J., M.M. ; 122 Iroquois Ave., Oshawa; Age 

42; Technician; member of Parkwood Lodge No. 695, G.R.C.; 
recommended by R.W.Bro. R.S. Throop and Bro. R.B. Stroud. 



7 - 



11. ROGNVALDSON, John Edwin Herbert, M.M. ; 4 Pine Rd. Apt. 
116, Elliot Lake; Age 55; Expediter; member of Elliot 
Lake Lodge No. 698, G.R.C. recommended by R.W.Bro. W.E. 
Schaefer and R.W.Bro. W.D. Mulack. 

12. SMITH, Donald M. , M.M. ; 672 Ann St., Box 395, Prescott; 
Age 63; Accountant; member of Central Lodge No. 110, 
G.R.C; recommended by V.W.Bro. D.J. Woodside and W.Bro. 
A.J. Cohoe. 

13. CASTLE, John Richard, P.M.; 27 Meadowglade Cresc, 
Willowdale; Age 56; Retired; member of Sunny side Lodge 
No. 582, G.R.C; recommended by W.Bro. John Boersma and 
R.W.Bro. Ed Drew. 

14. HUNTER, Kenneth A., P.M.; 10 Conlins Rd. , West Hill; 
Age 46; member of Sunnyside Lodge No. 582, G.R.C; 
recommended by W.Bro. John Boersma and R.W.Bro. Ed Drew. 

15. SNIDER, Alan C P.M.; 3 5 O'Meara Crt. , Willowdale; Age 
48; Chartered Accountant; member of Mt. Sinai Lodge No. 
522, G.R.C; recommended by W.Bro. John Boersma and R.W. 
Bro. J. Pos. 

16. SNIDERMAN, Sam, P.M.; 208 Torresdal Ave., Willowdale; 
Age 49; Chartered Accountant; member of Mt. Sinai Lodge 
522, G.R.C; recommended by W.Bro. John Boersma and R.W. 
Bro. Ed Drew. 

17. ALPERT, Howard Jerrold, M.M. ; 15 Riderwood Dr., Willowdale; 
Age ; Solicitor; member of Mt. Sinai Lodge No. 522, 
G.R.C; recommended by W.Bro. John Boersma and R.W.Bro. 

J. Pos. 

18. COVENT, Warren R. , M.M. ; 79 Gretman Cresc, Thornhill; 

Age 38; Manager; member of Mt. Sinai Lodge No. 522, G.R.C; 
recommended by W.Bro. John Boersma and R.W.Bro. Ed Drew. 

BALLOTING 

There being no objection, the Worshipful Master ordered 
a collective ballot to be taken on the 19 applications for 
membership as presented on pages 2 and 3 of the Lodge Proceed- 
ings, Vol. 6, No. 2, Nov. 1982. 

Following a favourable ballot on all applications, R.W. 
Bro. Balfour LeGresley declared the following Brethren eligible 
for membership in The Heritage Lodge No. 730, G.R.C, by 
affilication and requested each new member to affix his signature 
to the Lodge Register at his earliest convenience in token of 
submission to the Lodge By-Laws: R.W.Bros.: William John 
Crilly, Ralph Green, Jack Hughes and Allan Thomas James Wickins; 



- 8 - 



W.Bros. Edward Michael Elchyshyn, Douglas M. Gow, Robert John 
Macauiay, Charles WEllington Shaw and Allan Wm. White; and 
Bros. Morley Bowman Allen, Douglas Alfred Dale, Ross Melville 
Macdonald, Walter J. Mayhew, Harvey Menzies, Eric R. Mueller, 
Edward Charles Parker, Douglas R. Parkinson, William Herbert 
Rea, and Stuart William Taylor. 

GENERAL BUSINESS 

At this time the Worshipful Master invited the Brethren 
to offer any comments for the good of Freemasonry in general 
or the Lodge in particular. In response, the following proposal 
was introduced by the Lodge Secretary who had indicated earlier 
that he expected to be granted an Academic Leave from the 
University of Guelph commencing September 1st, 1983. There- 
fore, this seemed to be an appropriate time to give serious 
consideration to the formal separation of the dual responsibil- 
ities of i) Secretary of The Heritage Lodge and ii) Editor 
of the Lodge Proceedings. 

In as much as R.W.Gro. Gray Rivers has offered to assume 
the duties as Lodge Secretary, providing that Bro. Pos will 
continue as Editor of the Lodge Proceedings, perhaps now is 
the time to review our past procedure and make recommendations 
as to an alternative method of publishing the activities of 
the Lodge. 

This evening we have experienced a new concept in trans- 
acting the lodge business. The Chairman of the General Purpose 
Committee has summarized the activities of the lodge in his 
report which included: important correspondence, statement 
of accounts, receiving petitions, reports of committees and 
general business. Important items that were considered to 
require Lodge approval were then presented in the form of 
concise resolutions or motions. This approach has certainly 
reduced the amount of time normally taken up at the Regular 
Meeting. The suggestion is to carry this a step further and 
reduce the folume of printed minutes by allowing the Secretary 
to reproduce the summarized report as prepared by the Chairman 
of the General Purpose Committee. 

However, the main proposal to be discussed at this time 
or by subsequent correspondence from the memebership is as 
follows: that the 'Lodge Secretary 1 continue to produce and 
mail to the membership the Regular Lodge Summons and such 
Notice continue to include the newly accepted minutes of the 
preceeding Regular Meeting, together with such other announce- 
ments and notices of coming events as may be timely and appro- 
priate. Thereby reducing the normal work load on the Secretary. 

The 'Editor of the Lodge Proceedings' would then be 
responsible for the collecting, editing, collating and printing 
of the research papers together with the formal reviews and 
informal discussions in a single yearly volume. Other items 
may include feature articles, editorials, timely topics for 



special editions and other information in conformation with 
the policy of the Editorial Board. 

Major advantages would include a reduction in the postage 
weight for regular mailings of lodge notices, less delay in 
collecting material and possible cost savings in use of quick- 
pring processes. 

The yearly Proceedings, which would now include only the 
research papers and other related masonic information could 
probably be printed in a single volume. This would allow 
more time to put together a better quality product and possibly 
offer greater opportunity to patronize our own members in the 
printing business. If the annual Proceedings were printed in 
late June or early July then a large number could be distributed 
to the members at the time of the Annual Communication of Grand 
Lodge or perhaps the Lodge Representatives could pick-up 
bulk quantities for distribution to the members in their 
respective Districts. Please express your views on these 
suggestions or offer your own opinions to the Editor of the 
Lodge Proceedings, or come to the next General Purpose Committee 
Meeting and debate the subject in person. 

R.W.Bro. Gray Rivers expressed, in lighter vein, some 
apprehension of his earlier offer but concluded that he was 
all in favour of any approved procedure that would reduce 
the work load on the Lodge Secretary. 

R.W.Bro. LeGresley noted that the Lodge Membership was 
very close to the target objective and suggested that the 
Lodge restrict its membership to 500 active members and beyond 
that number fo accept only Correspondence Subscribers. This 
would reduce the operating cost of the Lodge. 

CALL OFF THE LODGE 

The Lodge was called from L to R at 8:00 p.m., and from 
R to L at 8:20 p.m. 

RECEIVING VISITORS 



V.W.Bro. Ernest J. Brown, Acting Director of Ceremonies 
was admitted to present R.W.Bro. Paul Egan, D.D.G.M., Toronto 
District 7 and R.W.Bro. Gray Rivers, D.D.G.M. , Waterloo 
District, acccompanied by R.W.Bro. Jack Crilly, D.D.G.M. 
Toronto District 2; R.W.Bro. Jack Moore, D.D.G.M., Toronto 
District 3; R.W.Bro. Rod Connor, Chairman G.L. Committee on 
The Condition of Masonry; R.W.Bro. Edsel Steen, member G.L. 
Committee on Masonic Education; R.W.Bro. John Millar, Vice 
President Board of General Purposes; R.W.Bro. Frank Bruce, 
Chairman G.L. Library Committee; R.W.Bro. Ken Bartlett, Grand 
Junior Warden; and W.Bro. Alan Fowler, Worshipful Master, 
Western New York Lodge of Research U.D., Buffalo, N.Y. 



- 10 - 



After receiving Grand Honours, R.W.Bro. Egan, on behalf 
of the visitors, thanked V.W.Bro. Brown for his kind and 
cordial welcome and then extended a special welcome to all 
present on behalf of Toronto District 7. 

AT THE ALTAR 

The Worshipful Master called on R.W.Bro. Arthur Watson, 
Lodge Chaplain, to attend the Altar: 

The lesson was read from Zechariah 4: 66 and 10. 

"This is the word of the Lord unto Zerubabel saying, not 
by might, nor by power, but by my spirit, saith the Lord". 

"The hands of Zerubabel have laid the foundation of his 
house; his hands shall also finish it; and thou shalt know 
that the Lord of Hosts hath sent me unto you." 

By God's spirit indwelling and motivating our lives, we 
realize those spiritual values of honesty, search for truth, 
the principles of moral rectitude, loyalty to that which is 
best, that which has permanence, that which is ultimate. Not 
by might or by power but by my spirit saith the Lord of Hosts. 

The open bible upon our altars ought to be to us a 
constant reminder at all times that from Him and Him alone 
come all the blessings that we enjoy in life, and to Him alone 
we owe our primary allegiance. This is so basic. This is the 
might of Freemasonry. 

Masonry has power - the power to make and to mold lives. 
Each of us has within himself the capability of becoming a 
better mason and this is the great challenge of all times, 
that we must all become the best we can. God will not be 
satisfied with half-way measures. 

We have then our challenge: "not by might, nor by 
power, but by my spirit" saith the Lord of Hosts. 

We have got to keep moving and move we must. Thus saith 
the Lord. 

LET US PRAY 

Eternal God, our Father, we thank you for the challenge 
of this place and when we leave it may we go to our homes 
with a deeper sense of dedication that we may show in our 
lives the things that we have found: that love that fills 
our hearts, those ideals which mold our lives and the drive 
which makes us true to our obligations. May we become stronger 
more dedicated citizens, and at last see the dawning of a 
world of brotherhood and peace. 

SO MOTE IT BE 



11 



The Worshipful Master, after permitting the Acting 
Director of Ceremonies to retire, then called on R.W.Bro. 
Ed Drew, Chairman of the H.O.M.E. Project for a brief report. 
Bro. Drew was pleased to announce that the campaign had 
passed the $60,000 mark and he was confident that the remaining 
$40,000 would be raised before the Annual Communication of 
Grand Lodge in July, 19 83. Twelve District Representatives 
for the H.O.M.E. Project were asked to stand to be recognized 
including the Project Treasurer James Major who is anxious 
to receive donations at all times. Bro. Stephen Maizels of 
Palestine Lodge was also introduced as the person responsible 
for donating the old building located in the Town of Woodbridge 
If all progresses according to plan, the restoration project 
should be a reality by the fall of this year. It has been 
estimated that the building contains 10,000 board feet of 
lumber hence the $100,000 objective represents $10.00 per 
board foot. Therefore, let us all strive to be a Board Foot 
Brother. 

RECEIVE IONIC LODGE NO. 25 

At this time, V.W.Bro. Ernest Brown, acting D.C. was 
again admitted to present W.Bro. Barry S. Hayne, Worshipful 
Master of Ionic Lodge, accompanied by 17 Officers and Members. 
In receiving the Worshipful Master and Members of Ionic Lodge, 
R.W.Bro. LeGresley thanked them for giving up their Regular 
Meeting Room on this night to allow The Heritage Lodge to 
use their facilities on this special occasion. 

PAPER PRESENTATION 

The Worshipful Master called on R.W.Bro. Frank Bruce, 
Chairman of the Lodge Committee on Masonic Information to 
proceed with the highlight of the evening. Following a brief 
explanation for the agenda to follow, Bro. Bruce called on 
R.W.Bro. Rod Connor to introduce the Speaker. 



M. W.BRO. ERIC WILLIAM NANCEKIVELL 

Our Guest Speaker this evening is well known to all of 
you as our Grand Master for the years 1975 to 1977; therefore, 
I shall endeavour to acquaint you with some other aspects 
of his career. Eric Nancekivell was born and educated in the 
City of Hamilton. Following his graduation from McMaster 
University he proceeded to the University of Toronto to obtain 
the Degree of Doctor of Medicine, a profession practiced by 
his father. During his medical training he met Isabel 
McCutcheon, a nurse. Their marriage produced two sons, Graham 
and Bill who have yet to see the light of Freemasonry. 

During and following the Second World War, he served as 
Medical Officer in the Royal Canadian Medical Corps and later 
with the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders. 



- 12 - 

He is very active in his church, having served as Warden, 
Bass Soloist and Licensed Lay Reader. 

Brother Nancekivell was Initiated, Passed and Raised in 
Hillcrest Lodge No. 594. Later he became a Charter Member 
of Composite Lodge No. 667, and served as Worshipful Master 
in 1953. In 1960 he became the D.D.G.M. of Hamilton District 
B and was appointed to The Board of General Purposes in 1962. 
From then until his election as Deputy Grand Master he served 
the board well as Chairman of the special committee to design 
and produce the 50 year lapel pin, and also a Chairman of 
the Grand Lodge Committees on Warrants and Benevolence. For 
several years he has been Chairman of Masonic Holdings. 

He is a member of Royal Arch Masonry, the Scottish Rite, 
an Honorary Inspector General 33° and the Deputy Provincial 
Grand Master of the Royal Order of Scotland. 

In 1975, as our Deputy Grand Master, he was appointed to 
the Commission of INformation for Recognition of the 
Conference of Grand Masters of North America, and served as 
Chairman of that Commission in 1981. 

Brethren, it is my pleasure to present your speaker, 
a concerned citizen, 
a loving husband, 
a proud father, 
a dedicated physician, 
an addicted bridge player, 
a devout churchman, 
a true Mason, and 
a real friend. 
M.W.Bro. Eric William Nancekivell 

COMMISSION ON INFORMATION FOR RECOGNITION OF 

THE CONFERENCE OF GRAND MASTERS OF MASONS IN 

NORTH AMERICA 

by 

M.W.Bro. Eric William Nancekivell 

At the Annual meeting of the Conference of Grand Masters 
held in Washington in February 1951, R.Wor. William E. Yeager, 
Grand Master of Masons in Pennsylvania, presented the following 
resolution: 

"Whereas: The recognition of a foreign Grand Lodge must, in 
the first place, be based on reliable information concerning 
that Grand Lodge, and 

Whereas: There is now no common means at the disposal of 
all Grand Lodges for obtaining such information and 

Whereas: This Grand Masters' Conference is the only 
joint activity of all the Grand Lodges in the United States, 
Canada, Puerto Rico and Cuba, and available to other grand Lodges 



- 13 - 



Therefore be it resolved: That the chairman of the 
Grand Master's Conference be authorized and directed to appoint 
a Commission of five or seven from reigning Grand Masters, 
Past Grand Masters, or such other Masonic authorities as in 
his judgement may be proper, to study and report next year upon 
the formation of a facility to gather, collate, and from time 
to time revise information on Grand Lodges in other lands as 
a service to the member Grand Lodges of this conference in 
arriving at their own conclusion concerning any applicant for 
recognition" . 

The Chairman organized a Committee of six who reported 
to the Conference in February 1952, and a Commission of six 
was nominated and elected, consisting of two Past Grand 
Masters, three Grand Masters and one Deputy Grand Master, 
including R.Wor. William E. Yeager, then a Past Grand Master 
of Pennsylvania, who had proposed the resolution the year 
before. Each year thereafter, the Chairman retired and a new 
member, usually a Deputy Grand Master, was elected to serve 
for six years and as Chairman for his sixth and final year 
on the Commission. 

It must be fully appreciated by all Masons that the 
Commission neither advises nor recommends that recognition 
be given to any Grand Lodges, but merely indicates whether 
or not it considers that a Grand Lodge in question satisfies 
the condition of regularity. 

The first and most important duty of the Commission was 
to establish a set of Standards of Recognition and the follow- 
ing were decided upon: 

1. Legitimacy of Origin. 

2. Territorial Sovereignty. 

3. Adherence to the Ancient Landmarks. 

Let us consider these three Standards in turn. 

1. Legitimacy of Origin . That the Grand Lodge requesting 
recognition has been lawfully formed by at least three just 
and duly constituted lodges, or that it has been legally 
recognized by a Grand Lodge in fraternal relations with the 
Grand Lodge from whom recognition has been requested. That 
such Grand Lodge must be "under the tongue of good repute" for 
an adequate number of years before such fraternal recognition 
is extended. 

When it is desired to organize a Grand Lodge, three or 
more legally constituted lodges working in a State, Territory 
or other independent political division where no Grand Lodge 
already exists, may meet in convention, adopt by-laws, elect 
officers and organize a Grand Lodge. The lodges within its 
jurisdiction then surrender their Warrants of Constitution to 
the Grand Lodge from which they respectively had received 



14 - 



them and accept others from the newly organized Grand Lodge 
which thenceforward exercises all Masonic jurisdiction over 
the State in which it has been organized. 

2. Territorial Sovereignty . That is, exclusive terri- 
torial jurisdiction. Mackey, that great and revered Masonic 
Scholar, states (and I quote) "the first principle of Masonic 
Law is that any territory into which Masonry has not been 
introduced in the organized form of Lodges, is ground common 
to all the Masonic authorities of the world, and therefore 
that it is competent for any Grand Lodge to grant a Warrant 
of Constitution and establish a Lodge in such unoccupied 
territory — and this right of granting warrants inures to 
every Grand Lodge in the world and may be exercised by as 
many as choose to do so as long as no Grand Lodge is orgnized 
in the territory." 

Where a Country, State or Territory is Masonically vacant, 
that is, has no Grand Lodge established in it, and three or 
more lodges in convention form a Grand Lodge, then the 
territory is occupied and Grand Lodges in other States or 
Countries are forbidden to exercise any powers in the Territory 
occupied by the new Grand Lodge. 

3. Adherence to the Ancient Landmarks . A Grand Lodge, 
to be recognized, must subscribe fundamentally ritualistically 
and in all its relations to the Ancient Landmarks, Customs 
and Usages of the Craft which are described as 

(a) Monotheism — an unalterable and continuing belief in 
God 

(b) The Volume of the Sacred Law as an essential part of 
the furniture of the Lodge 

(c) Prohibition of the discussion of religion and politics. 
It is interesting to note that the Grand Lodge of England many 
years ago in 1929 adopted a similar standard of recognition. 
Indeed, the principle of a belief in God (The G.A.O.T.U.) as 

a requisite for recognition was put to the test in March 1876 
when the Grand Lodge of England unanimously agreed that it could 
not recognize the Grand Orient of France because brethren had 
been initiated into lodges which either denied or ignored a 
belief in the G.A.O.T.U. 

More recently it has been noted that lodges in the Grand 
Orient of France do not have a Volume of the Sacred Law on 
the altar during an initiation but a so-called White Book 
with no printing in it. Of course the Grand Orient of France 
is not recognized by our Grand Lodge or by the other Grand 
Lodges of the Conference of Grand Masters of North America. 

These, then, are the STandards of Recognition still 
used by the Commission on advising the constituent Grand 
Lodges of the Conference— which are the Grand Lodges of every 
State in the United States (except Hawaii which is still 



15 



under the Grand Lodge of California) , of every Province in 
Canada except Newfoundland (in which no Grand Lodge exists 
but two District Grand Lodges) and of the York Grand Lodge 
of Mexico. 

The first Secretary of the Commission was M.Wor. Karl 
J. Mohr of Illinois. He was succeeded by M.Wor. Thomas S. 
Roy of Massachusetts, who has been the Special Speaker at our 
Annual Communication on 3 separate occasions, and who served 
from 1955 to 1967 when R.Wor. Robert L. Dillard of Texas took 
over and is still serving as Secretary Treasurer of the 
Commission. (You will notice that Bro. Dillard is R.Wor. 
although he was Grand Master of Texas — when a man becomes a 
Past Grand Master in Texas he reverts to R.Wor.) Bob Dillard 
is, without doubt, one of the most knowledgeable men in the 
world as regards Recognition — a delightful man, lawyer by 
profession, who speaks with a very distinctive Texas drawl. 

I believe the first Canadian on the Commission was our 
own M.Wor. Bro. Harry L. Martyn who served from 1957 to 1963 
and was, of course, Chairman in his final year. Since then 
there has always been a Canadian on the Commission; M.Wor. Bro. 
Sam Harden of Alberta was Chairman in 1968, M.Wor. Bro. Edgerton 
Brown of Quebec in 1974, and I had the honour to represent the 
Grand Lodge of Canada in the Province of Ontario as Chairman 
in 1980. In 1981, on my retirement, M.Wor. Bro. Lewis Beckstead 
of Manitoba, also a physician, was elected and is, of course, 
still serving. 

At each annual meeting of the Commission at the Conference 
of Grand Masters in North America, held every other year in 
Washington and on alternate years elsewhere such as Philadelphia 
Colorado Springs, and Orlando, (Florida) , delegations from 
foreign Grand Lodges are usually present to plead their cause 
through an interpreter — for example, we have recently had 
Grand Masters and their officers from Italy, Belgium, Germany, 
South America and elsewhere, and this adds a great deal of 
interest to the proceedings. 

It might be of interest now to detail the deliberations 
of the Commission on Information for Recognition on specific 
Countries, STates, or Territories as follows, and I choose 
only five from a great many which have come up during my term 
on the Commission. 



ITALY 

The Commission in 1977 reported on the Masonic situation 
in the Grand Orient of Italy. It was concerned about the 
activities of an organization called the P2 lodge, an alleged 
"propaganda and influence peddling" group which was receiving 
extensive coverage in the Italian news media. In 197 8, having 



16 



received a great volume of written material from Italian and 
non Italian sources, having examined many newspaper accounts 
of the Masonic situation in Italy and having interviewed the 
Grand Master on the Grand Orient of Italy and other Italian 
Masons, the Commission recommended that recognition be with- 
drawn — and this was done by our Grand Lodge and many other Grand 
Lodges in Canada and the United States. 

An election was held in Italy and completed in the Grand 
Orient of Italy on November 19, 1978 and a new slate of 
officers was installed, independent from the influence of the 
previous Grand Master. Also, the brethren who had been 
"arbitrarily and without cause" suspended by the previous 
Grand Master were restored to membership again. The Commis- 
sion then recommended to the Grand Lodges of the Conference 
that recognition be granted where it had been withdrawn or 
suspended. The Grand Lodge of Canada in the Province of 
Ontario followed the advice of the Commission and granted 
recognition again to the Grand Orient of Italy. 

In the Canadian and American press early in 1981 there 
were many articles concerning the P2 (Propaganda 2) lodge 
in Italy and the alleged use of Masonry, through membership 
in this lodge to further the political ambitions and machin- 
ations of some members of the Italian Government. However, 
information was received from the Grand Orient of Italy 
confirming that the P2 lodge was suspended from that Grand 
Lodge in 1976 and has been operating since then entirely apart 
from regular Freemasonry in Italy. 

BELGIUM 

In its February 1979 report the Commission expressed 
concern that the officers of the Grand Lodge of Belgium 
"countenanced intervisitation with irregular Masonic bodies 
in Belgium and adjacent countries and equivocated about requir- 
ing that candidates declare a belief in the G.A.O.T.U. On 
May 4, the Commission then issued a Special Communique to 
the constituent Grand Lodges of the Conference indicating 
that it did not consider the Grand Lodge of Belgium to be 
entitled to recognition. Our Grand Lodge therefore withdrew 
recognition as did many others. 

However, a new Grand Lodge was formed in Belgium, called 
the Regular Grand Lodge of Belgium. This new Grand Lodge, in 
order to eliminate any question as to its position with 
reference to the requirement of a belief in the existence of 
a Supreme Being, adopted a resolution agreeing to the terms 
of the "Basic Principles for Grand Lodge Recognition" adopted 
by the Grand Lodge of England and which are basically the 
same principles of Recognition held by the Commission in North 
America. Therefore the Commission, in 1980, expressed the 
opinion that the Regular Grand Lodge of Belgium was worthy of 



17 



recognition. The Grand Lodge of Canada in the Province of 
Ontario, after being petitioned by this new Grand Lodge, 
granted recognition, as did many of the other Canadian and 
American Grand Lodges. 

CUBA 

The Grand Lodge of Cuba was originally a member of the 
Conference of Grand Masters in North America. In recent years 
the Masons of Cuba have continued to operate regularly and 
courageously in spite of various difficulties. In its 1978 
report, the Commission referred to the action of the Cuban 
Government in promulgating a new law governing all voluntary 
associations including Masonic Lodges, and the levying of fines 
against the Grand Lodge of Cuba and a number of its constituent 
lodges. 

The Grand Lodge of Cuba has still nearly 25,000 Masons 
on its rolls, in 326 lodges, and still occupies several floors 
of its Temple in Havana. A great number of Cuban Masons have 
fled to Florida and have organized a Grand Lodge of Cuba in 
exile in Miami. This Organization in Florida apparently has 
requested recognition from some of the Grand Lodges in South 
America. There was, however, a communication from the Grand 
Lodge of Cuba in Havana requesting that no recognition be 
given to the organization in Florida. 

IRAN 

The Grand Lodge of Iran was instituted in 1969. However, 
the political turmoil there has made it impossible to know 
much about the Grand Lodge, the constituent lodges, or the 
Masons there. We know that a number of Masons, both Iranian 
and non Iranian, have left the country and some of them are 
in the United STates. One report received by the Commission 
states that Masons have been persecuted because of their member- 
ship in the fraternity. 

In its 1981 report, the Commission stated the fear that 
Freemasonry in Iran may have been completely destroyed. 
Information received is that all of the lodges under the Grand 
Lodge of Iran have been closed and the Masons who were not 
able to escape from the country have been persecuted and some 
of them executed. It would appear that until there is a 
change in the revolutionary government, there does not seem 
to be any possibility for the revival of Freemasonry in Iran. 

I 

The Commission, in its February 1982 report, states that 
it is now in a position to verify the membership of Masons 
in the United States who claim to belong to the Grand Lodge 
of Iran so that they may be allowed to affiliate with lodges 
in America. 



18 



ALASKA 

Nineteen lodges v/ere operating in the State of Alaska, 
all chartered by the Grand Lodge of Washington. At a conven- 
tion on February 4, 1981, called in advance for the purpose, 
twelve of the nineteen voted to form a Grand Lodge of Alaska. 
Since the Grand Lodge of Washington has exclusive territorial 
jurisdiction within the State of Washington only, and Alaska 
was "open territory", and since most of the other Grand Lodges 
in the United States of America had their origin under similar 
circumstances, the Commission was of the opinion that the 
Grand Lodge of Alaska was organized in accordance with regular 
Masonic procedure and was therefore entitled to and worthy of 
recognition. Incidentally, the Commission understood that 
the Grand Lodge of Alaska was formed with the consent of the 
Grand Lodge of Washington which had no objection thereto. 

A request for recognition was received by our Grand 
Lodge from the Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Alaska, M. 
Wor. James A. Williams, dated February 23, 1981, and recogni- 
tion was granted at our last Grand Communication in July of 
that year. 

These then have been five of the problem areas which 
have come before the Commission in the last six years, and 
chosen with a view to illustrating the difficulties which 
arise regarding the recognition of Grand Lodges in other 
countries and the advice given by the Commission to the 
constituent Grand Lodges of North America regarding them. 

CONCLUSION 

As Chairman of the Committee on Fraternal Relations for 
the Grand Lodge of Canada in the Province of Ontario, I can 
assure you of the great benefit to us, in the form of advice 
and recommendations of the Commission on Information for 
Recognition of the Conference of Grand Masters in North America, 
The very extensive and reputable sources of information avail- 
able to the Commission, through the Secretary treasurer, R.Wor. 
Dillard, from almost every Grand Lodge in the workd, make it 
possible for that organization to make known to the constituent 
Grand Lodge of the Conference the state of Masonry in every 
country, and to recommend recognition or non-recognition of 
all Grand Lodges in all cases where a problem may arise. 

In this, then, the Commission renders every regular Grand 
Lodge a great and efficient service — a service that enables 
us to maintain the very High Standards which are the Hallmark 
of regular Freemasonry. 



19 



DISCUSSION 

As explained earlier, this paper was not formally 
reviewed, and the following informal discussion is presented 
for the benefit of our readers. Where possible we have attempted 
to identify those asking the question or making a statement. 
All responses are those of M.W.Bro. Nancekivell. 

1. R.W.Bro. David Bradley: 

You mentioned that in several countries, the Commission 
has withdrawn its recognition from a certain G.L. and later 
when a second G.L. was formed, the Commission had given 
recognition to the new G.L., what happens to the lodges 
within that country? Do they just move over to the new G.L. 
and does the Commission run any sort of check on the member- 
ship; for instance, what happens to those masons who have 
transferred from the G.L. that has been declared illegal to 
the new G.L. , they have obviously been indoctrinated in rules 
which apparently were objectionable to us, does the Commis- 
sion run any further checks? 

Response - The Commission, through its many sources of infor- 
mation are in touch with all these countries. (You are 
referring to Belgium, of course.) Louis Lemnitzer who is a 
past G.L. officer from Belgium appeared at the Commission 
every year for a great many years talking about the 'bad guys' 
who didn't believe in the existence of a Supreme Being and 
eventually the message got through and it was confirmed and 
the G.L. of Belgium was declared unworthy of recognition. 
Then a group of masons who did believe in what we believe in 
formed the new regular G.L. of Belgium and I expect, although 
I have no concrete information on this, that a great many 
lodges belonging to the original G.L. of Belgium came over 
to the new regular G.L. of Belgium, particularly if they 
believed as we do in the existence of a Supreme Being. Some 
of these countries - such as in the Grand Orient of France 
have the idea they are free thinkers and don't need to be 
bound by the VSL and when that happens, they are beyond the 
pale - as far as regular Freemasonry is concerned. 

2. R.W.Bro. Jack Crilly (D.D.G.M., Toronto 2): 

Last night I was asked what the situation would be for 
a person wishing to make application to join a lodge here in 
Toronto, who took his first degree under the jurisdiction of 
the G.L. of Lebanon. He left the country, came to Canada and 
is now a Canadian citizen. What must he do to join a lodge 
here? He has willing sponsors, but when he is asked "have 
you ever made application to a masonic lodge" and he answers, 
"yes, I was initiated in the G.L. of Lebanon" .. According to 
our register we do not recognize the G.L. of Lebanon. What 
procedure should be followed? 



20 



Response - We can generalize on that - if he had been a member 
in a G.L. which our G.L. recognizes, then he could affiliate 
in a lodge here but since he is not a member of a G.L. which 
we recognize then he must make application in the usual way 
and be passed through our complete process. 

Bro. Crilly - I told him, this, but what should he answer when 
asked if he had made a prior application? I suggested that 
he be honest about it but explain the reason for leaving the 
country as being due to the political atmosphere. 

Response - He should be absolutely honest and can still be 
accepted if he subscribes to our belief. 

3. Person unknown: 

You are no doubt familiar with the 1982 list of lodges 
(which is a publication from the United STates) which lists 
G.L. 's that are generally recognized. I find that the G.L. 
of Nova Scotia recognizes the G.L. of Bolivia which is not 
in the book; the G.L. of British Columbia recognizes three in 
South America - the Grand Orient in Brazil, Baja California, 
and Mexico, which of course is in Mexico, and the G.L. of 
Saskatchewan recognizes "Brazil" and Rio de Janiero. I wonder 
if you can comment on these discrepancies? 

Response - Brazil has been a thorny question for many years. 
In Brazil there are two very large groups of Grand Lodges. 
One group is under the Grand Orient of Brazil, then each 
State in Brazil has a State Grand Lodge. The attitude of 
the Commission at the present time is that any G.L. in Brazil 
which is a State G.L. under the G.L. of Brazil is worthy of 
recognition and there are some 22 of them. Recognition is not 
advised for G.L.'s under the Grand Orient of Brazil. This 
is interesting and there is a lot more to it than we can go 
into now, but I am led to believe that the G.L. of England, 
with which the Commission agrees on almost everything, does 
not agree as far as Brazil is concerned. The fact that other 
Provinces might recognize other G.L.'s than we do might simply 
be due to the fact that these other G.L.'s have never applied 
to the individual G.L. for recognition. The custom is for the 
junior G.L. to apply to the senior G.L. for recognition. Each 
year we get one or more for recognition and usually this is 
granted, and the secretary writes asking them to appoint a 
representative and we never hear from them again. The situation 
in Brazil is somewhat uncertain. This is the reason Nova 
Scotia, and others, may recognize some that we do not and vice- 
versa. They may simply have never applied to our G.L. for 
recognition. They might be perfectly acceptable but would have 
to be adjudicated on their merit. 

4. R.W.Bro. Ed Wilson: 

You say that a requisite of recognition is a belief in God. 
Are you implying that a belief in Allah or Buddah would not be 
acceptable? 



21 



Response - God is a general term that implies a "Supreme Being" 
That Supreme Being may be called whatever you wish to call 
him and the other names for that Supreme Being are just as 
acceptable as ours. 

5. R.W.Bro. Ed Ralph: 

First, I'm interested in the way in which G.L. recogni- 
tion affects the individual mason. Lets assume that a brother 
consciously or unconsciously commits a masonic offence by 
visiting an unrecognized lodge - what would happen to that 
brother? Second, what would be the proper protocol for a 
member of our lodge to research in the area of an unrecognized 
lodge and my third question, I'm curious about the G.L. 
recognition sheet that is kept in the Tyler's register. I 
find that visiting brethren have cards with such poor English 
that we really don't know if the foreign language name matches 
the ones on the Tyler's list. 

Response to first question - We discussed that on the way over 
from Hamilton - of course its absolutely wrong for a man to 
try to enter a lodge if he is from a G.L. which we do not 
recognize. It is up to the Tyler to prevent that from happen- 
ing. If he doest succeed in gaining admission, I don't know 
what the penalty would be - its up to the Grand Master (if 
reported to him) - I suppose he would reprimand or otherwise 
chastise whoever was responsible for allowing it to happen. 
He could not do anything about the man who got in as he has 
no jurisdiction over him - but I expect that it would not 
happen a second time. 

Response to second question - I don't know any restriction 
on any mason researching any topic he wishes to research. If 
he were to require information from a mason in another juris- 
diction (and it would have to be one we recognize) then it 
should be done through the Grand Secretary - or it should be 
by arranging permission from our G. Secretary to their G. 
Secretary to allow exchange of information thereby giving their 
G.L. the opportunity of recognizing the authenticity of the 
information to be passed between the G.L.'s. 

Response to third question - As far as the sheet in the Tyler's 
register is concerned, it should be printed and legible. You 
are saying that sometimes their cards are not! In that case 
if he is a presentable type and if he says that he is from 
one of the G.L.'s we recognize I think you would have to take 
him at his face value, and allow him to enter. 

6. R.W.Bro. Fred Branscombe: 

In considering the criteria for recognizing a G.L. , you 
have said you exclude those which are atheistic and recognize 
those which are monoatheistic, but what is you reaction to one 
that holds to being polyatheistic with more than one God? 



22 



Response - According to the standards of recognition it has 
to be monoatheism. 

The question of the situation in Florida just now is very 
interesting. A lot of masons have fled from Cuba to exile 
in Florida. They would like to form a Grand Lodge of their 
own. We had the G. Master of Florida at our conference meeting 
a couple of years ago. He was very disturbed about this 
problem. For one thing, as you know, our friend Castro has 
sent some very questionable characters over to Florida - he 
cleared out all his jails. I'm not assuming that these people 
were masons although it's possible that a few of them were! At 
any rate, the G. Master of Florida said that Miami is now 
the murder capital of the workd, and that there is more crime 
there than anywhere else in the world at the present time. 
The other thing is that if they wish to form a G.L. in exile, 
then you have two G.L.'s in the same State or territorial 
jurisdiction and that is not allowed under the standard for 
recognition. Further, suppose this new G.L. of Cuba in exile 
did form and if later the political climate changed and they 
moved back to Cuba, then there would be two G.L.'s in Cuba 
and that is not allowed. 

7. V.W.Bro. Ernest Brown: 

Would you care to comment on the Prince Hall Grand Lodge 
and if they have made application to your Commission? 

Response - That is a very interesting question. They have 
not made application for some years now but they did in the 
past. The Grand Master for Ontario is a patient of mine and 
we discuss where we hold our Grand Communications and how 
many attend, etc. He is a fine man. They were denied recog- 
nition earlier and I expect that if they applied they would 
be rejected again. Their motives in wanting recognition are 
not that they want to come to our lodges and they don't want 
us visiting their lodges. They would like to be considered 
the premier coloured Grand Lodge. There are apparently other 
coloured Grand Lodges but Prince Hall is the best known and 
I expect the strongest. They would like to be THE RECOGNIZED 
coloured Grand Lodge. The problem arises in the southern 
states where those Grand Lodges, rightly or wrongly, would 
have nothing to do with coloured people belonging to their 
lodges. Some years ago the G.L. of New Jersey had one lodge 
which was composed entirely of coloured men and the G.L. of 
Mississippi suspended recognition of the G.L. of New Jersey. 
It is unlikely that they would be recognized if they re-applied 
but they haven't done so now for a good number of years. 
They are good people and this Grand Master is a very good type ■ 
a very moral man and probably an excellent Grand Master of 
Prince Hall in Ontario. 



23 



8. R.W.Bro. Gray Rivers: 

I was going to ask a similar question to that of V.W.Bro. 
Brown. In spite of the fact that they are not recognized, do 
we consider them clandestine? 

Response No, not at all. 

Bro. Rivers: This was a point of real concern to me as one 
of my most intimate associates, was a very prominent member 
of Prince Hall. He has been an active member of my choir and 
my church for many years, soloist at my daughter's wedding and 
an intimate personal friend. I have always been concerned 
because the jurisdiction in which I entered masonry, has an 
obligation which required that one not attend a clandestine 
lodge or converse masonically with a clandestinely-made mason. 
I wish a clarification on this point because masonic conversa- 
tion has been initiated by my very good friend and he always 
utters the J.W.'s toast on leaving my house. I can therefore 
now assume that he is not considered clandestine. 

Response - No, he would certainly not be. 

9. V.W.Bro. Laurie Brandridge: 

Is there any given number of lodges or districts needed 
to form a Grand Lodge or is it formed territorially? 

Response - They do all have to be in the same territory but 
any three or more lodges can form a Grand Lodge. In Alaska 
there were twelve, that is, twelve out of nineteen. What 
happened to the other seven? They remained under the G.L. of 
the State of Washington but I assume that by now some have 
joined with the G.L. of Alaska. Distances being what they 
are in Alaska, it would be almost as difficult for represen- 
tatives in one part of Alaska to attend G.L. in another part 
as it would be for them to take a plane down to Washington. 

10. V.W.Bro. Ernest Brown: 

Bearing in mind that in Canada we have seven lodges of 
Women Freemasons, who use a ritual that is practically ident- 
ical to ours, and whose Grand Lodge is in England, might the 
day be far away when a presentation might be submitted by 
them for recognition? Some of the brethren might not know 
that there are three such lodges in Toronto, one in Oshawa, 
one in London, one in Vancouver and one in Victoria and perhaps 
others. 

Response - Yes, and I think they call the head of the lodge 
the Worshipful Master! 



24 - 



A representative of this group met with M.W.Bro. Irvine 
some years ago and while they did not make formal request for 
recognition they asked why they were not recognized. He 
referred them to our Constitution which says we must be 21 and 
male etc. and unless we changed the whole initial concept of 
masonry we could not recognize them. 

11. Bro. John Taylor: 

Some years ago M.W.Bro. George Draffen, P.G.M., Grand 
Lodge of Scotland, gave a paper to the Quatuor Coronati 
Lodge on the subject of Prince Hall Masons and brethren who 
wish more information might review this article, A.Q.C. Vol. 
89, pg. 70-91; also Vol. 13, pg. 56. 

Response - Yes, I am familiar with the paper, its an interest- 
ing article. They don't have the same problem in England, 
Scotland and Ireland. I'm not sure if the Prince Hall exists 
there but certainly its not as strong as on this continent. 
I think it started in the United States on the Eastern Seaboard. 

12. Person unknown: 

Would you distinguish further between the terms "Clandestine" 
and "unrecognized". 

Response-That' s a good point. To me clandestine means "bad guys". 
If a lodge or G.L. did not believe in the existence of a Supreme 
Being I would think that lodge or G.L. would be clandestine - 
but because a lodge or G.L. has not yet made application for 
recognition might mean that they simply have not gotten around 
to applying so they are unrecognized but not necessarily 
clandestine. 

13. W.Bro. Alan Dempsey: 

Is Prince Hall not the one who got their charter from the 
G.L. of England and then refused to go under the G.L. of 
Massachusetts and continued on their own? 

Response - That may be so, I'm not sure. 

Editor's Note: According to the Prince Hall Masonic Yearbook, 
Prince Hall and 14 other free negroes of Boston were made 
Master Masons on March 6, 1775, in an Army lodge stationed 
near Boston (Lodge 441, in the Register in Dublin, Ireland), 
with authority to meet as a lodge but not to confer degrees. 
In March, 1784, Prince Hall petitioned the G.L. of England 
for a warrant or charter, and on May 6, 17 87, African Lodge 
No. 459 G.L.E. (Moderns) was established. On June 24, 1791, 
a General Assembly of coloured masons met in Mason's Hall, 
Water Street, Boston, Massachusetts, and formed African Grand 
Lodge with Prince Hall as its first Grand Master; which office 
he held until his death on December 4, 1807. On June 24, 1808, 



- 25 - 



the three then existing lodges met in Boston and changed the 
name to M.W. Prince Hall Grand Lodge, F.&A.M. of Massachusetts, 
in memory of Prince Hall. 

14. Bro Leslie Angus: 

I'd like to ask you to distinguish between the Grand 
Orient and the Grand Lodge. Are they synonymous terms? 

Response - No they are not - at least they are not in some 
areas. The Grand Orient in Brazil is, I think, under the aegis 
of the Scottish Rite rather than craft masonry, however, that 
is not so in other areas. The Grand Orient in Italy is THE 
Grand Lodge of Italy. The Grand Orient of France is one of 
three grand lodges in France. The one we recognize being the 
Grand Loge Nationale de France. So, while in some areas the 
Grand Orient means the same as Grand Lodge, in Brazil, France 
and other countries they do not mean the same thing. 



THANK SPEAKER 

R.W.Bro. Watson, in expressing the thanks of all those 
present, commented that he had been priviledged to listen to 
M.W. Bro. Nancekivell on many occasions which has reinforced 
his respect for Bro. Nancekivell as a mason and of whom we 
can be extremely proud; one who has demonstrated his profic- 
iency in learning, understanding and educating and who, we 
can be sure, will continue to inspire his audience and uphold 
the tenants of our Fraternity. We are especially grateful 
to him for having taken the time from his practice, church, 
business and the other facets of his busy life to present this 
very interesting paper. The audience responded with hearty 
applause. 

Before turning the meeting back to the Worshipful Master, 
R.W.Bro. Bruce also added his thanks and appreciation to the 
speaker and all those who participated in the discussion. 
He reminded the Brethren that volunteers are always required 
to research information and prepare papers to help the Committee 
in planning future programs. It takes about 1 to 2 years to 
go through the paper presentation procedure. 

The Worshipful Master also invited interested masons to 
offer their assistance to the paper presentation program. 
R.W.Bro. Ralph with 5 assisting Stewards were permitted to 
retire. 

R.W.Bro. LeGresley called on R.W.Bro. Rivers for a few 
closing remarks; in responding, Bro. Rivers wittingly reminded 
the Brethren of a couple of attributes that contributed to 
longevity. In more serious vein he expressed his appreciation 
for having been able to share in the past achievements of The 



26 



Heritage Lodge since its inception. He particularly praised 
the Lodge for living up to its lofty objectives which has not 
gone unnoticed by our present and past Grand Masters. The 
H.O.M.E. Project is the latest endeavour to reach the goals 
of the Lodge. With such enthusiasm, dedication and sincerity 
the future of The Heritage Lodge is assured. 

ANNOUNCEMENTS 

The Worshipful Master called on the newest members of 
The Heritage Lodge to stand and be recognized. R.W.Bro. 
Bradley announced the next meeting of the Lodge Committee of 
General Purposes was to be held in the Preston-Hespeler 
Masonic Temple, Cambridge, Wednesday evening, April 20, 1983, 
at 7:30 p.m. R.W.Bro. Drew invited all present to attend the 
light lunch being served in the banquet hall. There being 
no further business, the Lodge was closed in harmony at 10:15 
p.m. 



AMENDMENTS TO LODGE BY-LAWS 

Further to the 'NOTICE OF MOTION', Re: Lodge By-Laws 
in these Proceedings, and the completely rewritten proposed 
By-Laws as published in their entirety on pages 22-48, Lodge 
Proceedings Vol. 6, No. 2, the By-Laws Committee, after 
reviewing a number of written submissions, make the following 
suggestions to be considered at the next Regular Meeting of 
the Lodge to be held on May 13, 1983. 

It should be mentioned at the outset, that because of the 
unique characteristics of The Heritage Lodge, the traditional 
Craft Lodge By-Laws were not completely satisfactory, which 
made it necessary in the beginning to provide more detailed 
explanation for a number of Articles and Sections in the 
original By-Laws. The following suggestions will reflect the 
experience gained in our first 5 years of progress and which 
has enabled us to present a more concise interpretation for 
some of the unclear Sections of the first By-Laws. 

1. In keeping with the above comments and to enable us to 
remove the descriptive aspects of a number of the introductory 
paragraphs, it is recommended that the fourth and fifth 
paragraphs of the introductory "A Brief History" be deleted 
as well as ARTICLE III and combined with ARTICLE VII Section 1 
and ARTICLE VIII Section 7 to form a new section titled "PREFACE" 
as follows: 

PREFACE 

The Heritage Lodge differs in many respects from other 
lodges in this Jurisdiction because it relates primarily to 
the historical rather than the speculative aspects of Masonry. 



27 - 



It is intended to provide an intellectual environment for the 
pursuit of Masonic knowledge, and also to provide a means 
for receiving and recording historical artifacts to ensure 
the preservation of our Masonic Heritage without encroachment 
on the normal functions of Constituent Lodges, whose province 
it is to initiate candidates, confer degrees and provide light 
and instruction for the brethren in Masonry. 

The Lodge accepts by affiliation in the usual manner, all 
Masons of like mind who are desirous of working together to 
fulfill the aims and objectives established by the membership; 
and by the unique character of its purpose, complements the 
work of the other Lodges by directing its principal efforts 
to the following objectives: 

1. To preserve, maintain and uphold those historical 
events that formed the foundation of Ancient, Free 
and Accepted Masonry. 

2. To promote the study of Masonry in general, and provide 
a service by responding to requests for Masonic infor- 
mation. 

3. To produce Lodge Proceedings, Research Papers, and 
Historical Reviews; and to arrange special lectures 
and visual presentations. 

4. To organize and maintain a "Central Inventory" of 
items of historical interest in the possession of 
Lodges. 

5. To encourage participation by Regular Lodges and 
their members in the activities of this Lodge. 

6. To endeavour to establish a "Masonic Museum". 

7. To encourage Masonic scholars and Lodge Historians 
to become more interested in the history of their 
own Lodges and their artifacts. 

In a Lodge uniquely dedicated to such objectives, committees 
are a very important part of the organizationl structure. They 
not only ensure a democratic process of Lodge government and 
provide a means for active participation by the Lodge members, 
but also provide a measure of continuity for the future of the 
Lodge. Under good leadership, Lodge committees, working in 
harmony and directed toward the aims and objectives of the 
Lodge and the basic principles of Freemasonry, will provide 
the mose desirable environment for the brethren to produce 
significant recommendations for the continuing success of the 
Lodge. 



28 



A Lodge Library is especially valuable, because of the 
unique character of The Heritage Lodge and the objectives it 
has engaged itself to fulfill. Resources beyond the capa- 
bilities of the Lodge will be required. Some Masonic scholars, 
contributing to the Lodge programs, will rely on their private 
collections or other sources for information, and would find 
it inconvenient to operate from a common source. Neverthe- 
less, books are being donated to the Lodge and these should be 
made available to the brethren, especially young Masons 
searching for light and truth. 

As the future activities of the Lodge increase, a more 
active relationship between The Heritage Lodge Library and 
the Grand Lodge Library should be established and maintained. 

2. The date of institution should be shown as follows: 

Instituted AL 5977 
AD 1977 

3. To provide more flexibility in moving the lodge meeting 
places throughout the Province at the invitation of other 
Lodges in the Jurisdiction and recognizing that the Installa- 
tion should be held in our 'home' Lodge Room, ARTICLE IV, 
Section 1 be changed to read: 

1. Regular meetings of the Lodge shall be held normally 
on the third Wednesday of the months of September, 
November, March and May, at 7:30 p.m. in the Preston- 
Hespeler Masonic Temple, Cambridge. However, the 
meetings in September, March and May may be held at 
any suitable time and place within those months at 
the invitation of any Lodge in the Jurisdiction. 

4. Change the wording of ARTICLE V, Section 5 to read: 

5. The Worshipful Master, on his election and after 

having consulted with as many of the elected Officers 
and Past Masters of the Lodge as is feasible, shall 
appoint . . . 

5. Change the word 'obligated 1 in ARTICLE VIII, Section 1, to 
read expected ; and delete the last sentence. 

6. With reference to the Life Membership Fund, ARTICLE XVII, 
Sections 6 and 7, and APPENDIX A, changes will be required but 
it is recommended that, except for updating the prevailing 
interest rate, and making it clear that the calculations for 
"Life Membership" on page 43 is an example only, the proposed 
By-Laws remain unchanged until after the Special Committee 

on Life Membership has presented its report to the Grand Lodge 
Board of General Purposes. 



- 29 - 



7. With reference to APPENDIX B, Section 1, page 45, change 
$10,000" to read $2,000 . 

8. Also in APPENDIX B, Section 4, change to read: 

4. The annual fee for Corresponding Subscriber shall be 
$15.00 payable in advance. He shall not be required 
to pay any additional fees . 

9. Delete ARTICLES XVIII, XIX, XX and XXI in their entirety. 

10. In ARTICLE VI: 

i. Section 3, delete the words "and are not fixed by 
any By-Laws", 
ii. Section 8, line 8, change "same" to the monies . 

11. Move Sections 18 and 20 of ARTICLE XXII to ARTICLE VI 
maintaining the same numbered sequence. 

12. Questions have been raised as to the necessity of including 
all or parts of ARTICLES IX, X XIII and XIV. It is recommended 
they be deleted in their entirety. 

R.W.Bro. W. E. Wilson, 

Chairman, 

By-Laws Committee. 



COMING EVENTS 

APRIL 20, 1983 (Wednesday), General Purpose Committee Meeting 

of The Heritage Lodge will be held in the Preston-Hespeler 
Masonic Temple at 7:30 p.m. This will be the final 
discussion on the proposed Lodge By-Laws Amendments prior 
to presentation to the Lodge for final approval at the 
Regular Meeting in May. 

MAY 18, 1983 (Wednesday), Twenty-Seventh Regular Meeting of 
The Heritage Lodge will be held in the Preston-Hespeler 
Masonic Temple at 7:30 p.m. The following agenda will 
be presented at the General Purpose Committee Meeting 
in April for approval: 

1. Regular Business Meeting to preceed unique program. 

2. Introduce program, R.W.Bro. Frank Bruce. 

3. Special demonstrations by R.W.Bro. Ed Ralph featuring 
identification, validation, cataloging and presenta- 
tion of artifacts; and instructions for oral history 
recording procedures. 

4. Gavel identification co-ordinated by R.W.Bro. Joel 
Piper. A brief review of the saga of the Wilson 
Mercer Wilson gavels in Wilson and neighboring 
Districts. Each Lodge fortunate to have received 



30 



one of the gavels will have their representative 

give a brief anecdote of their respective lodge 

gavel. A short re-dedication ceremony will be conducted 

by R.W.Bro. Arthur Watson. W.Bro. Ted Jacques will 

make a presentation of the History of Freemasonry in 

Norfolk County. 

5. A special feature of the evening will be the presen- 
tation of two mini-papers. W.Bro. Art Andrew will 
present a paper dealing with the return of Freemasonry 
to France during and immediately following the second 
world war; Bro. Andrew was the Worshipful Master of 
the reconstituted lodge. R.W.Bro. Jack Dargavel 

will relate his experiences with Freemasonry in a 
German Prisoner of War Camp. 

6. Panel discussions and close the lodge. 

This promises to be an exciting evening and we look for 
a large attendance and a great deal of participation. 

JULY 20, 1983 (Wednesday), Special H.O.M.E. Project luncheon 
to be held in the Ballroom of the Royal York Hotel, 
Toronto; to continue no later than 1:30 p.m. more details 
at a later date. 

SEPTEMBER 21, 1983 (Wednesday), Twenty-Eighth Regular Meeting 

of The Heritage Lodge will be held in the Preston-Hespeler 
Masonic Temple at 7:30 p.m. On this occasion we will 
have the unique privilege of receiving the Worshipful 
Master of Quatuor Coronati Lodge No. 2076, London, England, 
our own R.W.Bro. Wallace E. McLeod who will present a 
sequel to his first paper on "The Old Charges". This 
is also our Annual Election of Lodge Officers. 

NOVEMBER 16, 1983 (Wednesday), Twenty-Ninth Regular Meeting 

of The Heritage Lodge will be held in the Preston-Hespeler 
Masonic Temple, Cambridge, at 7:30 p.m. Installation of 
the Worshipful Master and Investiture of the Lodge Officers. 
This is also the occasion of the Official Visit of the 
D.D.G.M. of Waterloo District. 



MASONIC LODGE ROOM RESTORATION PROJECT 

At the time of writing (March 26, 1983) the H.O.M.E. 
Project Fund Raising Campaign has reached the $66,000 mark, 
leaving a balance of approximately $34,000 to be raised 
before July. It is the wish of the Committee that in the next 
two months as they enter the home stretch, a final thrust will 
allow them to reach their objective before July of this year. 

Correspondence has just been received from the Office 
of the Grand Secretary in response to our request advising 
that the Grand Master and the Deputy Grand Master are pleased 
to announce that the date of Saturday, October 1, 1983, at the 



- 31 



hour of 1:00 p.m. has been selected for the purposes of the 
cornerstone laying at the site of the proposed restoration of 
the Masonic Lodge Room in Black Creek Pioneer Village. 

Also M.W.Bro. Howard 0. Polk has seriously considered 
and respectfully suggested the date of Thursday, March 31, 
1983, at the hour of 10:00 a.m. as being an appropriate time 
for the sod-turning ceremony for the Lodge Room Restoration 
Project. 



NEW ADDRESSES 

The following names and addresses should be added to 
your Lodge Mailing List: 



441. Wm. J. Crilly DDGM 
60 Clipper Rd. #913 
Willowdale, Ont. M2J 4E2 
High Park Lodge #531 
Toronto District 2 (458) 



447. Robert J. MacAulay PM 

Mount Pleasant Rd. R.R.#2 
Brantford, Ont. N3T 5L5 
Scotland Lodge #193 
Brant District (464) 



442. Ralph Green PGT 

6646 Walkers Line 
R.R.#2, Milton, Ont. L9T 2X6 
Grand River #151 
Waterloo District (459) 



448. Charles W. Shaw PM 
Box 123 

Maple, Ontario 
Vaughn Lodge #54 
Toronto Dist. 7 (465) 



44 3. Jack Hughes PDDGM 
Kirkfield 
Ontario K0M 2B0 
Victoria Lodge #398 
Victoria District (460) 



449. Allan W. White WM 
61 Need St. 

Bobcaygeon, Ont. K0M 1A0 
Verulam Lodge #2 68 
Victoria Dist. (466) 



444. Allan T.J. Wickins PDDGM 
252 Clark Dr. 

Peterborough, Ont. K9H 5P6 
Peterborough Lodge #155 
Peterborough Dist. (461) 



450. Morley B. Allen MM 
6 Panter Circle 
Belleville, Ont. K8P H57 
Belleville Lodge #123 
Prince Edward Dist. (467) 



445. Edward M. Elchyshyn PM 451 
26 Kelly St. 
Capreol, Ont. POM 1H0 
National Lodge #588 
Sudbury Manitoulin Dist. (462) 



Douglas A. Dale MM 
325 Wellington Ave. 
Kingston, Ont. K7L 4J3 
Royal Edward Lodge #585 
Frontenac Dist. (468) 



44 6. Douglas M. Gow PM 
2050 Family Cresc. 
Mississauga, Ont. L4X 1G6 
The Sunnylea Lodge #664 
Toronto Dist 2 (463) 



452. Ross M. MacDonald MM 
Box 119 

Consecon, Ont. K0K 1T0 
Consecon Lodge #50 
Prince Edward Dist. (469) 



32 - 



453. Walter J. Mayhew MM 
105 Pine St. 

Belleville, Ont. K8N 2M9 
Eureka Lodge #283 
Prince Edward Dist. (470) 



457. Wm. H. Rea MM 

74 Mohawk Rd. E. 
Hamilton, Ont. L9A 2G9 
Ionic Lodge #549 
Hamilton Dist. C. (474) 



454. Harvey Menzies 

217 Lansdowne St. 
Sudbury, Ont. P3C 4M4 
Nickle Lodge #427 
Sud.-Manitoulin Dist. 



MM 458. Stuart W. Taylor MM 
1439 Colonial Rd. Group 
Box #119, Belleville K8N 4Z3 
Eureka Lodge #283 

(471) Prince Edward Dist. (475) 



455. Eric R. Mueller MM 
R.R. #1 

Freeton, Ont. LOR 1K0 
Waterdown Lodge #357 
Hamilton A Dist. (472) 



459. Douglas R. Parkinson MM 
334 Herchimer Ave. 
Belleville, Ont. K8N 4Y9 
Eureka Lodge #2 83 
Prince Edward Dist. (476) 



456. Edward C. Parker MM 
2 93 Herchimer Ave. 
Belleville, Ont. K8N 4Y9 
Eureka Lodge #283 
Prince Edward Dist. (473) 

PROPOSED AMENDMENT FOR EDITORIAL POLICY 

The following proposal was received just before press time, 
and is included with these proceedings for consideration by the 
membership prior to the General Purpose Committee Meeting, 
April 20th, 1983. If this proposal is accepted, it will 
replace appendix D of the proposed Editorial Policy as presented 
on Page 48, Lodge Proceedings Vol. 6, No. 2. 

THE HERITAGE LODGE 
A.F. & A.M., NO. 730, G.R.C. 



Editorial Policy 



Publications 



1. For the purposes of this statement of Editorial Policy, 
the publications of The Heritage Lodge, A.F. & A.M., No. 730, 
G.R.C, shall include the Proceedings of the Lodge, together 
with such occasional publications as may be issued from time to 
time under the auspices of the Lodge. They shall not include 
the lodge summons which is issued for the assembling of the 
Brethren, in accordance with the Book of Constitution, by the 
Secretary at the direction of the Master. 

2. The execution of Editorial Policy shall be in the hands 
of the Editor, assisted (at his discretion) by the Editorial 
Board. 






33 



Proceedings 

3. The Proceedings may (but need not) be printed in 
conjunction with the lodge summons. 

4. The Proceedings shall normally include the texts of 
papers presented at meetings of the Lodge. They may (but need 
not) also include transcripts of summaries of comments on these 
papers submitted by the appointed referees or by other interested 
Masons. They may (but need not) also include such other excerpts 
from the proceedings of the lodge, and such additional material, 
as the editor may deem expedient. 

The Editor 

5. The Editor shall be elected, when need arises, after 
nomination in open Lodge. He shall hold office for as long 

as may suit his own convenience and the pleasure of the Lodge. 
The editorship shall not be regarded as an annual office, and 
it need not be held by the Secretary of the Lodge. The Editor 
is not subject to the direction of the Master, but he is 
accountable to the Lodge. 

6. The Editor shall edit the publications of the Lodge. 

He shall have full authority to make such changes in the form of 
the material submitted to him as to bring it into conformity 
with standard editorial usage. 

7. If, in the Editor's judgement, there is any question 
about whether a paper presented before the Lodge should be 
published, he shall refer the question to the Editorial Board. 

8. The Editor shall, in consultation with the Editorial 
Board, present an annual budget to the Finance Committee. He 
shall have authority to conduct negotiations about the printing 
of the Lodge publications. 

9. In the event that the Editor knows that he will not 
be available to carry out his duties for a portion of the year, 
he may nominate an Acting Editor, who must be approved by the 
Lodge's Committee of General Purposes, to perform his functions 
during his absence. 

The Editorial Board 

10. Each year at the regular February meeting of the 
Lodge's Committee of General Purposes, the Editor shall recommend, 
for confirmation by the Committee, an Editorial Board consisting 
of no less than three additional members. 

11. When called upon by the Editor, the Editorial Board 
shall have power to decide whether any paper delivered before 
the Lodge should or should not be published. 



- 3^ - 

12. The Editorial Board may be called upon by the Editor 
to adjudicate any manuscript submitted for consideration as 

a special publication of the Lodge. 

13. After this statement of Editorial Policy has been 
approved by the Lodge, the Editorial Board shall have the 
responsibility of preparing amendments as need shall arise, 
and submitting them to the Lodge for adoption. 

Special Publications 

14. When a manuscript is submitted for consideration 

as a special publication of the Lodge, the Editor shall refer 
it for adjudication, at his discretion, to either the 
Editorial Board, or (in the event that specialized knowledge 
is required) another Special Editorial Committee, which he 
shall nominate and present for confirmation to the Lodge's 
Committee of General Purposes. 

Submission of Manuscripts 

15. The texts of papers presented orally before the 
Lodge, and of manuscripts submitted for consideration as 
special publications, shall normally be typewritten on 
standard 8J x 11 inch white bond paper (or the closest 
metrical equivalent), double-spaced, with wide margins. 

Amendment 

16. This statement of Editorial Policy may be amended, 
on the recommendation of the Editorial Board, by resolution 
of the Lodge, duly announced in advance in the Lodge summons. 

Clifford Baxter 
Frank Bruce 
Jacob (Jack) Pos 
Wallace McLeod, 
(Chairman) 

Postal Codes 

New postal regulations will require that all addresses 
must include the postal code. Please examine your address 
on the accompanying envelope, if it does not include your 
postal code, we don't have it. Therefore, if you wish to 
continue receiving the Lodge Proceedings, please send your 
complete address to the Lodge Secretary. 



- 35 - 

GRAND LODGE OFFICERS (1982 - I983) 

THE MOST WORSHIPFUL THE GRAND MASTER 

M.W.Bro. Howard 0. Polk 

892 Aaron Ave., Ottawa, K2A 3P3 

THE DEPUTY GRAND MASTER 
R.W.Bro. Ronald E. Groshaw 
31 Princess Margaret Blvd., Islington, M9A 1Z5 

THE GRAND SECRETARY 
M.W.Bro. Robt. E. Davies 
Drawer 217, Hamilton, L8N 3C9 

DISTRICT DEPUTY GRAND MASTER, WATERLOO DISTRICT 
R.W.Bro. Rev. W. Gray Rivers 
8 Kirby Ave., Dundas, L9H 5K9 



LODGE OFFICERS (1982 - 1983) 



Worshipful Master, . . . 
Immediate Past Master, 

Senior Warden, 

Junior Warden 

Chaplain, 

Treasurer, 

Secretary 

Assistant Secretary, 

Senior Deacon 

Junior Deacon, 

Director of Ceremonies 

Inner Guard, 

Tyler 

Senior Steward, .... 
Junior Steward, .... 

Organist, 

Historian, 

Archivist, 



.W.Bro. Balfour LeGresley 

W.Bro. George E. Z wicker 

.W.Bro. David C. Bradley 

.W.Bro. C. Edwin Drew 

.W.Bro. Arthur Watson 

.W.Bro. Gary J. Powell 

.W.Bro. Jacob (Jack) Pos 

W.Bro. George Moore 

.W.Bro. Robert S. Throop 

W.Bro. Albert Barker 

W.Bro. Aage Bjerknes 

W.Bro. Edsel C. Steen 

W.Bro. Wilfred Greenhough 

.W.Bro. Edmond V. Ralph 

W.Bro. Donald B. Kaufman 

W.Bro. Len Hertel 

W.Bro. Allan J. Cohoe 

W.Bro. Glen T. Jones 



CHAIRMEN, LODGE COMMITTEES (1982 - I983) 

GENERAL PURPOSES, R.W.Bro. David Bradley (SW). 
MEMBERSHIP & UNATTACHED MASONS, R.W.Bro. Ed. Ralph. 
REFRESHMENT & ENTERTAINMENT, R.W.Bro. Ed. Ralph (SS) . 
MASONIC INFORMATION, R.W.Bro. Frank J. Bruce. 
CENTRAL DATA BANK, W.Bro. F. James M. Major. 
MASONIC MUSEUM, R.W.Bro. Jack Pos 
LODGE LIBRARY, W.Bro. Donald Co sens. 
LODGE PUBLICATIONS, R.W.Bro. Clifford Baxter. 
FINANCE & BY-LAWS, R.W.Bro. W. Ed. Wilson. 
FREEMASON EDITOR, W.Bro. Gregory Robinson. 
EDITORIAL BOARD, R.W.Bros. W.E. McLeod, F.J. Bruce, 

and J. Pos. 

note: The duties of all Lodge Officers, Lodge Committees 
and Appointed Positions are defined in the Lodge 
By-Laws, ARTICLES V to VIII. 



<Proceetimg£ 

Zi)t heritage Hobge J5o-730 



INSTITUTED 

Sept. 21, 1977 
WORSHIPFUL MASTER 
R.W.Bro.B. LeGresley 
213 Riverside Drive, 
Toronto, Ontario, 
M6S 4A8 
Res. (416) 769 3804 




CONSTITUTED 

Sept. 23, 1978 
SECY & EDITOR 
R.W.Bro. J. Pos 
10 Mayfield Ave. , 
Guelph, Ontario, 
NIG 2L8 
Res. (519) 821 4995 
Bus. (519) 824 4120 



Vol.6, No. 4 



Cambridge, Ontario, Canada 



May 1983 



Please Note : 

The opinions expressed by the authors, reviewers and 
other participants in the papers and discussions included 
in these Proceedings are not necessarily those of The 
Heritage Lodge. 



SUMMONS 

Dear Sirs and Brethren: 

By order of the Worshipful Master, R.W.Bro. Balfour 
LeGresley, you are hereby summoned to attend the Twenty- 
Eighth Regular Meeting of The Heritage Lodge No. 730, to 
be held in the Preston-Hespeler Masonic Temple, Cambridge, 
located at the North-East corner of the intersection of 
Highways 401 and 24 on:- 

WEDNESDAY EVENING, SEPTEMBER 21st, 1983, at 7: 30 p.m. 

prompt for the purpose of introducing and transacting such 
business as may be regularly brought before the Lodge. This 
is also the annual election of officers. 

On this occasion we will be priviledged to have as our 
distinguished speaker, R.W.Bro. Wallace E. McLeod, Worshipful 
Master of Quatuor Coronati Lodge No. 20 76, London, England. 
Bro. McLeod is the first Mason in North America to be elected 
to this high and important office in Freemasonry 's Premier 
Research Lodge. 

By special request, Bro. McLeod, who presented the 
first research paper in our lodge, thereby setting the high 
standard of excellence which all subsequent speakers have 
endeavoured to emulate, will demonstrate by example his 
formula for masonic research. The primary objective is to 
inspire and encourage promising scholars to become more 



actively involved in masonic research activities. 

Favourable reports having been received on the appli- 
cations for affiliation, as presented at the Regular Meeting 
on May 18th, 1983. the Worshipful Master has declared that a 
Ballot will be taken at this meeting for the following 
Brethren: 

R.W.Bro. Floyd Walker; V.W.Bro. Richard Quinton; W.Bros, 
Leslie T. Bodrogi , Kenneth Hughes, John Frederick Unwin,and 
George P.R.(Bob) Webster? and Bros. Bryan D. Amos, William R, 
Campbell, William L. Eby, Robert Arthur Long, Terry Allan 
McLean, James Warren Soloman and Thomas Charles Warner. For 
full details, see pages 3 and ^ of these proceedings. 



GENERAL PURPOSE COMMITTEE 

I am directed by R.W.Bro. David C. Bradley, Chairman of 
the Committee on General Purposes to announce that the next 
meeting of the Committee will be held in the Preston-Hespeler 
Masonic Temple, Cambridge, on:- 

WEDNESDAY EVENING, AUGUST 31st, 1983, at ■ : 30 p.m. 

sharp for the purpose of transacting and discussing Lodge 
Business. 

All Lodge Officers and Chairmen of Standing and 
Appointed Committees are expected to attend; all interested 
Members are particularly welcome. Every Committee Chairman, 
or his designate, is reminded that a written report is to be 
presented, or you may mail it directly to the Secretary of 
the General Purpose Committee, W.Bro. George Moore, R.R.#1, 
Limehouse, Ontario. As a number of important issues that 
concern the future of the Lodge are to be discussed, it is 
important that a large number of Brethren be present. 

Sincerely and fraternally, 

R.W.Bro. Jack Pos, 
Lodge Secretary. 



3 - 



TWENTY- SEVENTH REGULAR MEETING 



The Twenty-Seventh Regular Meeting of The Heritage Lodge 
No. 730, G.R.C., was held in the Preston-Hespeler Masonic 
Temple, Cambridge, Ontario, Wednesday, May 18, 1983, with 
11 Officers, 56 other Members and 30 Visitors for a total 
of 97 Masons as per Lodge Register. 

OPEN THE LODGE 

The Lodge was opened in the First Degree at 7:44 p.m. 
by R.W.Bro. Balfour LeGresley, Worshipful Master, who 
welcomed the Brethren and hoped they would receive profit 
and pleasure from the unique program planned for the evening. 
A special welcome was extended to R.Wor.Bro. Rev. Gray Rivers 
D.D.G.M. , Waterloo District and R.Wor.Bro. John Hofstetter, 
D.D.G.M. , Wilson District. 

CONFIRMING LODGE MINUTES 

It was regularly moved by R.W.Bro. Edsel Steen, seconded 
by R.W.Bro. David Bradley, that the minutes of the Twenty- 
Sixth Regular Meeting of the Lodge, held in the Davenport 
Masonic Temple, Toronto, March 2, 1983, as printed in the 
Lodge Proceedings Vol. 6, No. 3, and mailed to all members 
of the Lodge, be accepted as circulated. Carried. 

RECEIVING PETITIONS 

Applications for membership by Affiliation were received 
from the following Masons: 

1. AMOS, Bryan D. , M.M. ; 3451 Capricorn Cresc, Mississauga; 
Age 38; Police Officer; member of Sunnylea Lodge No. 664, 
G.R.C.; recommended by W.Bro. N. Soutar and W.Bro. John 
Boersma. 

2. BODROGI, Leslie T. , P.M.; 1610 Magenta Crt. , Mississauga; 
Age 36; Private Investigator; member of Parkdale Lodge 
No. 510, G.R.C.; recommended by W.Bro. John Boersma 

and R.W.Bro. Jack Pos. 

3. CAMPBELL, William R. , M.M. ; 10 Belvedere #8, Brockville; 
Age 82; Retired; member of Salem Lodge No. 368, G.R.C.; 
recommended by Bro. Donald R. Moore and V.Wor.Bro. 
Donald J. Woodside. 

4. EBY, William L. , M.M. ; 206-601 Barber Ave. N. , Listowel; 
Age 63; Chief Engineer; member of Clifford Lodge No. 

315, G.R.C.; recommended by R.W.Bro. E. James Scarborough 
and R.W.Bro. Norman H. Bell. 

5. HUGHES, Kenneth, P.M.; R.R. #3" Tottenham; Age 54; Program 
Manager; member of Spry Lodge No. 3 85, G.R.C.; recom- 
mended by R.W.Bro. Ed Ralph and V. W.Bro. Laurie Brandridge 



6. LONG, Robert Arthur, M.M. ; 91 Springhead Gardens, 
Richmond Hill; Age 44; Psychometrist; member of Univer- 
sity Lodge No. 496, G.R.C.; recommended by W.Bro. R.S. 
Macintosh and Bro. C.C. Brodeur. 

7. MCLEAN, Terry Allan, M.M. ; 6540 Falconer Dr. #110, 
Mississauga; Age 35; Wage and salary specialist, Kodak 
Canada Inc.; member of Sunnylea Lodge No. 664, G.R.C.; 
recommended by W.Bro. N. Soutar and W.Bro. John Boersma. 

8. QUINTON, Richard D. P.G.S.; 105 Aloma Cresc, Bramalea; 
Age 48; Tooolmaker; member of Sunnylea Lodge No. 664, 
G.R.C.; recommended by R. W.Bro. N.R. Strutt and R.W. 
Bro. David C. Bradley. 

9. SOLOMAN, James Warren, M.M. ; R.R. #4, Havelock, Age 69; 
Retired; member of Havelock Lodge No. 435, G.R.C.; 
recommended by R.W. Bro. James H. Hutchinson and W.Bro. 
George E. Zwicker. 

10. UNWIN, John Fredrick, P.M.; 295 Burford St., Newmarket; 
Age 70; Retired; member of Tuscan Lodge No. 99, G.R.C.; 
recommended by V. W.Bro. Charles Tugwell and W.Bro. 
Philip B. Harrison. 

11. WALKER, Floyd, R.W. Bro.; P.O. Box 209, Lakefield; Age 
58; Semi-Retired; Life member of Richmond Lodge No. 23, 
G.R.C.; recommended by R.W. Bro. J.M. Howarth and W.Bro. 
George E. Zwicker. 

12. WARNER, Thomas Charles, S.W.; 4380 Longmoor Dr., Bur- 
lington; Age 51; Ontario Hydro; member of Brant Lodge 
No. 663, G.R.C.; recommended by W.Bro. David S. Amis 
and V. W.Bro. C. Laverne Dawdy. 

13 WEBSTER, George P.R. (Bob), P.M.; 1275 Markham Rd. , 
Apt. 1201, Scarborough; Age 56; Salesman; member of 
Confederation Lodge No. 720, G.R.C.; recommended by 
R.W. Bro. Ed Drew and R.W. Bro. David C. Bradley. 

The Worshipful Master declared the Petitions received 
and instructed the Secretary to process them in the customary 
manner. 

NAMES OF BRETHREN MORE THAN 12 MONTHS IN ARREARS OF DUES 

As the Secretary neglected to bring in the names of 
the four Brethren more than 12 months in arrears of dues 
and as each has received proper notification of impending 
suspension, the following will be suspended at the next 
Regular Meeting (September 21, 1983) unless payment is 
received in the meantime: 

D. Neil Gardner Peter Morrison 

R.A. Liebrock Stanley R. Westfall 



- 5 - 



COMMITTEE REPORTS 

1. General Purpose Committee, presented by the Chairman, 
R.W.Bro. David C. Bradley, S.W. 

"The Meeting of April 20, 1983, commenced at 7:30 p.m. 
with 14 members present. Minutes of the previous meeting 
of the Committee of General Purposes, held on February 16, 
1983, were accepted as circulated. 

The following correspondence was discussed: 

1. Letters received from R.W.Bro. Balfour LeGresley, 
R.W.Bro. W. James Curtis and R.W.Bro. Wallace E. 
McLeod offering suggested changes to the proposed 
By-Laws. These were discussed during the lengthy 
debate on the By-Laws. 

2. W.Bro. Stewart Greavette enclosed a proposal for a 
cataloging system being considered in Niagara 
District, which he felt may be useful to our Lodge. 
He also reported that he was preparing a paper 
dealing with the numbering system of Lodges in 
Ontario. The cataloging proposal was directed to 
the Library Committee, and the information about 
the paper to the Masonic Information Committee. 

3. R.W.Bro. D.J.H. Thompson, Secretary of Temple Lodge 
No. 690, to announce that one of their members had 
been suspended N.P.D. This was referred to the 
Secretary for appropriate action. 

4. W.Bro. David S. Amis reported on a special gavel 
in the possession of The Barton Lodge No. 6. This 
was referred to the Masonic Information Committee 
as it affected the presentations at the May 18, 
1983 meeting. 

5. Bro. P.J. Jeffrey, Secretary of the Wm. S. McVittie 
Bursary Committee enclosed nomination forms for 
possible candidates. Referred to the Secretary for 
appropriate distribution. 

6. Two letters from the Office of the Grand Secretary: 

(a) Confirmation of Saturday, October 1, 1983, as 
the date for the cornerstone laying of the 
restored Temple at the Black Creek Pioneer Village 
Toronto. The G.M. notes that a luncheon for the 
H.O.M.E. project is scheduled for July 20, 1983 
and directs that it must terminate at least 
fifteen minutes prior to the re-assembling of 
Grand Lodge at 1:30 p.m. 

(b) Announcements in regard to the 12 8th Annual 
Communication of Grand Lodge. 

7. W.Bro. Alan Cohoe advises that he had received the 
Historical Record of The Heritage Lodge from W.Bro. 
Alan Fowler, W.M. of the Western New York Lodge of 
Research U.D. 

8. R.W.Bro. E.V. Ralph, regarding the vault requirements 
and expressing concern about the environmental 
aspects. This was referred to the Expediting 



$ 


406 


60 




595 


47 




48 


00 




15 


00 




200 


00 




9 


25 




9 


19 


$1 


,283 


51 



Committee. The Chairman of the Committee W.Bro. Alan 
Hogg, noted that W.Bro. Hardy Caig, a professional 
engineer and a member of The Heritage Lodge, has 
kindly offered professional advice regarding the environ- 
mental concerns for the vault storage area in the base- 
ment of the restored structure. In addition the M.T.R.C.A 
has also been provided with professional assistance in 
formulating their plans. 

The following accounts were received and with the 
Secretary's latest addition are now presented to the Lodge 
for approval for payment: 

Secretary's account - postage, telephone, etc 

Guelph Printing Services 

Mrs. Karen Perry - Typing 

Turner Bookbinding 

Grand Lodge fee for 8 Life Memberships 

Assistant Secretary's Account 

Lee Craft - plaque engraving 

TOTAL 

A number of applications for affiliation were presented. 
It was duly moved and seconded that they be read in Lodge 
and the names published in the next summons. 

The Expenditing Committee reported that arrangements 
had been made for a sod turning ceremony which was held 
on Thursday, March 31, 1983, at 10:00 a.m. M. W.Bro. Howard 
0. Polk broke the ground with a ceremonial spade presented 
by Mrs. Florence Gell, Chairman of the Metro Toronto and 
Region Conservation Authority. The dedicatory prayer was 
read by R. W.Bro. Arthur Watson, Lodge Chaplain. 

R. W.Bro. Balfour LeGresley, Worshipful Master of The 
Heritage Lodge was present, also Mr. Russell Cooper, Director 
of Heritage Buildings, M.T.R.C.A. and a group of 37 Brethren 
and their familites. Grateful thanks must be extended to 
Bro. A. Sykes of Zeta Lodge No. 410, who obtained and had 
gold-plated a suitable spade, complete with a commemorative 
plaque. The spade, when suitably engraved, will be presented 
to M. W.Bro. Howard 0. Polk. 

The cornerstone laying ceremony will be conducted at 
1:00 p.m. October 1, 1983. The arrangements for this cere- 
mony are being organized by R.W.Bros. Robert S. Throop and 
Edsel C. Steen. 

The Finance Commitee for the H.O.M.E. project reported 
that as of April 15, 1983, the total of donations had 
reached $72,244.64. Although donations continue to come in, 
very little time remains to achieve the goal of $100,000.00 
before Grand Lodge meets in July, 1983, hence a sense of 
urgency exists. A special luncheon is planned for July 20, 
1983, in the Ballroom of the Royal York Hotel. Tickets at 
$12.00 are available. A meeting of D.D.G.M.'s and District 



7 - 



representatives was held as planned on April 23, 1983, with 
lunch provided by M.T.R.C.A. The Deputy Grand Master, R.W. 
Bro. Ronald E. Groshaw spoke to the Brethren. 

A lengthy discussion followed on the subject of the 
proposed By-Laws of the Lodge and the proposed amendments 
offered by several Brethren. As this will be the subject of 
a formal motion at this Regular Meeting, it is only necessary 
to state that the Committee of General Purposes recommends 
that the proposed By-Laws with the discussed amendments be 
adopted. To ensure that the By-Laws represent the wishes of 
the members, perhaps they should be printed in the next 
summons in their revised form and the formal vote taken at 
the next Regular Meeting in September, 1983. 

A discussion took place concerning the increasing costs 
of the Lodge Summons (Proceedings) . It was moved that, for 
a trial period of one year, commencing in September, 198 3, 
the summons only be sent four times a year and to include the 
report of the Committee of General Purposes; whilst the 
Proceedings would be published once a year. 

The next meeting of the Committee of General Purposes 
is to be held in the Preston-Hespeler Masonic Temple, 
Cambridge at 7:30 p.m., August 31, 1983. Respectfully and 
fraternally submitted on behalf of the Committee by the 
Chairman, R.W. Bro. David C. Bradley." 

MOTIONS 

It was regularly moved by R.W. Bro. D.C. Bradley, 
seconded by R.W. Bro. C.E. Drew, that the accounts as 
presented in this report in the amount of $1,283.51, be paid. 
Carried. 

It was regularly moved by R.W. Bro. D.C. Bradley, 
seconded by R.W. Bro. C.E. Drew, that the report of the 
Committee of General Purposes be adopted. Carried. 

MOTION RE: RESTORATION OF W.BRO. THOMAS A. SILAGY 

It was regularly moved by R.W. Bro. J. Pos, seconded by 
R.W. Bro. C.E. Drew, that W.Bro. Thomas A. Silagy be reinstated 
to good standing in The Heritage Lodge No. 730, G.R.C., in 
accordance with Section 203(a) of the Constitution and subject 
to payment of dues owing ($25.00) plus the current year dues 
($15.00) for a total payment of $40.00, and in conformity with 
the recommendations of the Committee of Inquiry. Carried. 

MOTION RE: PROPOSED AMENDMENTS TO LODGE BY-LAWS 

It was regularly moved by R.W. Bro. J. Pos on behalf of 
R.W. Bro. Ed Wilson, seconded by W.Bro. George Moore, that 
the proposed By-Laws of this Lodge as published in the Lodge 
Proceedings Vol. 6, No. 2, pages 22-48, Nov., 1982, with the 
amendments as published in the Lodge Proceedings Vol. 6, No. 



- 8 



3, page 26-29 and 32-34, March, 1983, which were reviewed 
by the Committee of General Purposes on April 20, 1983, 
and reported earlier at this meeting and which are sum- 
marized as follows: 

1. That the names of two of our Charter Members, Bro. John 
Edward Brittain and Bro. John Craig Masecar, which were 
left off the second list by mistake be added. 

2. Delete the reference to the September meeting being held 
other than in Cambridge, in Article IV, as this is the 
annual election of Officers. 

3. Delete the whole of Section 3, Article VI. 

4. Retain last sentence, Section 1, Article VIII. 

5. Delete the whole of Section 8, Article VIII; to be 
replaced by Appendix D as shown in Proceedings Vol. 6, 
No. 3, pages 32-34 and as modified in Item 14. 

6. Delete the whole of Section 9, Article VIII, and replace 
with the following sections: 

FINANCES 

9. The Finance Committee shall, subject to the approval 
of the Worshipful Master, consist of the Treasurer, 
Secretary, Senior Warden, Junior Warden, and one 
other appointed by the Worshipful Master. Their 
duties shall be: 

(a) Supervise the general finances of the Lodge. 

(b) Review all budgets submitted by Lodge Committees 
and incorporate them into its overall Lodge 
budget. 

(c) Prepare and submit to the Committee of General 
Purposes, at its first meeting after Installation, 
a budget of revenues and expenditures for the 
current year which, after approval by the said 
committee and adoption by the Lodge, shall 
control and govern the expenditures of the Lodge. 

(d) Submit to the Meeting of the Committee of General 
Purposes immediately prior to Installation, a 
detailed report of actual revenues and expendi- 
tures against budget figures, and make interim 
reports during the year. 

(e) Review the investment portfolio on a continuing 
basis, and make recommendations to the Committee 
of General Purposes for the purchase and/or sale 
of securities. 

REPORTS 

10. Immediately following their appointment and at their 
earliest convenience, all Committees shall prepare 

a plan of action and a budget for the coming year. 
Such budgets shall be submitted to the Chairman of 
the Finance Committee and to the Secretary of the 
Committee of General Purposes giving details of 
current activities to date. 



- 9 - 



7. Delete the whole of Section 3 (Resignation of Members), 
Article IX. 

8. Delete the whole of Article XI. 

9. Revise title of Article XV to read: Corresponding 
Subscriber. 

10. Add the six paragraphs which are presently in Appendix 
A and incorporate them in Article XVII, remembering 
them as Sections 8-13, respectively. 

11. Change Section 1, Article XX (Alterations to the By- 
Laws) , to read: 

1. No additions, alterations or amendments shall be 
made to these By-Laws except by notice of motion 
given at a Regular Meeting, entered in the minutes 
and presented in the summons for the next Regular 
Meeting, at which time the motion being duly 
moved, seconded and supported by at least two-thirds 
of the votes then present, the proposed amendment 
shall be submitted to the Grand Master for approval. 

12. In Appendix A, Vol. 6, No. 2, page 43, that the 
words " Example Only " be added to the sub-heading 
Life Membership Fee in the middle of the page. 

13. In Appendix B, that the fee for Initiation remain 
at $10,000.00. 

14. The Editorial Policy, Vol. 6, No. 3, pages 32-34; 
delete the last sentence Section 5 under 'The 
Editor 1 and replace with "His appointment will 
be reviewed annually by the Committee of General 
Purposes"; and add to the Lodge By-Laws as 
Appendix D. 

Following a brief discussion and a suggestion that all 
of the amendments be incorporated in a reprinting of the 
Lodge By-Laws, the motion was passed unanimously. 

MOTION RE: LODGE PROXY TO GRAND LODGE 

It was regularly moved by R.W.Bro. Balfour LeGresley, 
seconded by R.W.Bro. R.S. Throop, that R.W.Bro. J. Pos 
be the Lodge Proxy for the 1983 Annual Communication of 
Grand Lodge. Carried. 

UP-DATE OF H.O.M.E. PROJECT 

R.W.Bro. C.E. Drew reported that the Project Treasurer 
would be away for a couple of weeks, but the total receipts 
as of May 5, 1983, amounted to $79,957.00. He encouraged all 
members to emphasize the importance of reaching our objective 
before July 20, 1983. R.W.Bro. Drew invited all members of 
the Lodge to attend the Special Luncheon at Grand Lodge to 
honour the Fund Raising Representatives from all Districts. 
Tickets cost $12.00 each. 



- 10 - 



NEW CORRESPONDENCE 

At this time the Secretary read a letter from M.W.Bro. 
Robert E. Davies, Grand Secretary, dated May 5, 1983, as 
follows: 

■ Re : Cornerstone Laying Ceremony 

Dear Bro. Pos: 

Your correspondence under date of April 25, 1983, and 
concerning the above-captioned topic, has been received and 
referred to our Deputy Grand Master, R.W.Bro. Groshaw, for 
his consideration and direction. Much time was consumed in 
deliberating this subject and it was agreed that in view of 
the extenuating circumstances and ramifications involved in 
this project, little could be done by this office until 
after Grand Lodge 1983. Please be assured that the topic 
is not being shelved but will be foremost in our minds and 
certain planning and scheduling will take place within this 
office. However, little can be done in acceding to your 
request until following the Grand Lodge Communication. 

Kindest and personal regards, 

Sincerely and fraternally, 

R.E. Davies, 
Grand Secretary." 

Since the time and date had previously been set by 
Grand Lodge, the Secretary had been instructed to request 
a copy of the customary form outlining the various offices 
that normally participate in the Ceremony and for which the 
arrangements committee of our Lodge would be responsible. 

A number of Brethren expressed concern as to the 
disposition of our request, and the very heavy work load 
over a period of 12-14 weeks imposed on the Office of the 
Grand Secretary by the demands of the preparation, planning 
and organization of the Annual Communication of Grand Lodge 
which resulted in a motion by W.Bro. John Neu and W.Bro. 
Percy Moffatt and passed by the Lodge, that the Secretary 
relay the above concerns to the Grand Secretary. 

BALLOTING 

There being no objection, the Worshipful Master ordered 
a collective ballot on the 17 applications for membership 
as appeared on pages 6-7, Vol. 6, No. 3, of the Lodge 
Proceedings for March, 1983. R.W.Bro. Ainsley Roseborough 
having passed on to the Grand Lodge above between the time 
of his application and the balloting. 

Following a favourable ballot on all remaining applica- 
tions, R.W.Bro. Balfour Legresley, W.M. , declared the 



11 



Brethren eligible for membership in The Heritage Lodge No. 
730, G.R.C., by affiliation and requested that each affix 
his signature to the Lodge Register at his earliest conven- 
ience in token of submission to the Lodge By-Laws namely: 
R.W.Bros.: Robert Carl Casselman and Jack Moore; V.W.Bro. 
Harold Franklin Whitmore; W.Bros. Garry Edward Bulmer, 
John Richard Castle, George Ansley Heels, Kenneth A. Hunter, 
John Milton Robinson, Alan C. Snider, Sam Sniderman, and 
Samuel J. Wilson; Bros. Harold Jerrold Alpert, Warren R. 
Covent, Robert French, Brian J. Moorse, John Edward 
Herbert Rognvaldson and Donald M. Smith. 

The business portion of the Regular Meeting was con- 
cluded at 8:35 p.m. 

At this time the Acting Director of Ceremonies was 
received to introduce a large deputation bearing unique 
gavels. 

AT THE ALTAR 

The Worshipful Master, after a brief explanation of this 
custom in The Heritage Lodge, called on R.W.Bro. Arthur 
Watson, Lodge Chaplain, to attend the Altar: 

In the 40th Chapter of Isaiah we read these words: 

"They that wait upon the Lord shall renew their strength, 
they shall mount up with wings like eagles, they shall 
run and not be weary, they shall walk and not faint." 

Our fraternity must be like the eagle, spread its wings, 
display its great power and strive for the lofty 
peaks of achievement, where rests the destiny of our 
craft. 

The formula for generating this new power and strength 
is hard work and the use of our God-given powers of 
imagination and ingenuity. Thus we will overcome apathy 
and move to greatness. 

Remember each age is a dream that is dying, or one 
that is coming to birth. 

OURS IS THE CHOICE! 

LET US PRAY 

O God, who hast given us a plan and a challenge grant 
that we may take the opportunities that are ours so that the 
plan may come to fruition and our Order may go forth to 
enrich the life of mankind with strength and vitality. 

So mote it be. 



12 



SPECIAL HISTORICAL PROGRAM 

At this time the Worshipful Master called on R.W.Bro. 
Ed Ralph to proceed with the work of the evening. 

R.W.Bro. Ed Ralph 

I am honoured to have the opportunity of assembling 
such an important group of masons for this 'practicum' in 
The Heritage Lodge. The dictionary definition of a 'prac- 
ticum' is a group session in which a student gains practical 
experience. On this occasion we propose to demonstrate 
three of the seven important objectives of The Heritage Lodge 
After observing what we trust will be an interesting program, 
we hope you may be inspired to organize and present similar 
programs in your own Lodges and Masonic Districts. 

FIRST - We will demonstrate an interesting approach to the 
identification of certain artifacts which, through the 
passage of time, may have lost some of their masonic signif- 
icance to present day masons. We, in The Heritage Lodge, 
believe this documentation will be of considerable import- 
ance for future Historians. This demonstration is concerned 
with certain masonic gavels primarily in Wilson District. 
R.W.Bro. Joel Piper has contributed a great deal of effort 
in organizing and coordinating this activity. 

SECOND - This related objective deals with the presentation 
by W.Bro. Ted Jaques, to The Heritage Lodge, of an old 
Wilson District History. Bro. Jaques has researched the 
author of the History for this occasion. Brethren, it will 
soon be a reality, that is with the successful completion of 
the H.O.M.E. project, The Heritage Lodge will have its own 
atmospheric, dust proof, halogen lighted, and air-conditioned 
vault for storage of important masonic documents and 
artifacts. There is a real need for every member to be con- 
tinually alert for such items and when appropriate to have 
them presented to the Lodge for safe-keeping. 

THIRD - You will be given the opportunity to appreciate the 
value and importance of oral histories. The micro-electronic 
age in which we live simplifies the recording of our 
histories, but we must be willing to seek out masons who 
can relate their stories. R.W.Bro. Jack Dargavel and W.BrOi 
Arthur Andrew have each volunteered to relate a very real 
masonic experience in their life so that we might demonstrate 
to you the importance of documenting this type of information 
for future masons. 

R.W.Bro. Joel Piper will now introduce the first 
session. 

R.W.Bro. Joel Piper 

Worshipful Master, Officers of the Lodge and my Brethren, 
I am pleased to have the opportunity of participating in the 



- 13 - 



work of the evening and to have had some responsibility in 
coordinating the artifacts of the William Mercer Wilson 
gavels that are part of the history of our Jurisdiction and 
in particular Wilson and Hamilton A Districts. It would 
be very inappropriate not to express appreciation for the 
introduction by R.W.Bro. Ed Ralph, and on behalf of all those 
who journeyed here to display their respective gavels, we 
appreciate the introduction and the courtesy extended to 
us by The Heritage Lodge. 

It is proper to say that many items of early masonic 
usage are to be found in many lodges in our Jurisdiction. 
In keeping with one of the objectives of The Heritage Lodge 
No. 730, the subject of this evening's endeavour is the 
reported existence of a number of gavels believed to have 
been made from the effects of our late M.W.Bro. Wm. Mercer 
Wilson. Between 1911 and 1936 two individuals, W.Bro. Dr. 
W.A. Mcintosh and W.Bro. J.W. Church, both Past Masters of 
Norfolk Lodge No. 10, made a number of gavel presentations 
to certain lodges in Wilson District and also to The Barton 
Lodge No. 6 in Hamilton. It was a real challenge to identify 
those lodges and to encourage a representative to attend 
this gathering and bring with him the treasured artifact. 
I am particularly pleased that twelve such lodges are 
represented here tonight. The records suggest that about 
22 such gavels were presented over this period of time. 




TWO OF THE SIX GAVELS IN POSSESSION OF ERIE LODGE NO. 
14 9, PORT DOVER. THE LOWER GAVEL IS MADE OF RED OAK AND IS 
IDENTICAL TO MANY SIMILAR GAVELS IN OTHER LODGES IN WILSON 
DISTRICT. THE UPPER GAVEL IS MADE OF WALNUT AND UNIDENTIFIED 



14 



The initial research for this particular project was 
done by R.W.Bro. Jack Pos. It was he who identified the 
particular design, how they came into existance and which 
lodges may have received them. This naturally prompted a 
number of questions: what were they made from, who presented 
them, who made them, and are they in use in the lodges where 
they exist. I now call on the representative from each of 
the 12 lodges to present a brief two-minute ■ show-and-tell * 
concerning the gavel in possession of their lodge and any 
related anecdote that may be of interest. 

THE BARTON LODGE NO. 6, HAMILTON 
John W. Fernihough, W.M. 

Worshipful Master, R.W. DDGM's and Brethren, the Officers 
of The Barton Lodge are usually attending a dinner meeting 
tonight as we regularly hold an officer's meeting on the 
third Wednesday of each month. W.Bro. David Amis, our 
Director of Ceremonies, several other Brethren and myself 
have been chosen to attend this special meeting. It is a 
great pleasure for us to be with you on this historic occasion. 
I would like to read a paragraph from V.W.Bro. Rev. Norman 
Macdonald's history of The Barton Lodge. "The Brethren of 
Norfolk Lodge No. 10, Simcoe, like those of Union Lodge No. 
7 have special claims on the fraternal regard of the old 
Barton and are always welcome in our midst and we do not 
see enough of each other. In May, 1911, these three old 
lodges No.'s 6, 7 and 10, met and mingled together in our 
lodge room. To commemorate the event, the Norfolk Brethren 
presented The Barton with a gavel made from the wood from 
the dining table of the first Grand Master of the Grand 
Lodge of Canada, M. W.Bro. Wm. Mercer Wilson. The gift was 
most suitably acknowledged and handed to the Archivist for 
safekeeping. A similar presentation was made in November, 
1936, when Norfolk Lodge revisited The Barton. In June, 
1938, our Lodge paid a fraternal visit to Norfolk Lodge and 
exemplified the second degree." 

I have brought along this evening a photostat copy of 
the regular minutes of The Barton Lodge dated May 10, 1911, 
and November 11, 1936. They support and amplify the excerpt 
I have read from the history book. I am pleased to leave 
them with you. Although this gavel has no markings, we have 
every reason to believe this is the one presented by Norfolk 
Lodge in 1911 (similar to the lower gavel in the photograph) . 
You have heard that it was immediately handed to the archivist 
for safekeeping. You may be interested to know that although 
an archives committee had been in existence since 1896, it 
was in 1910 that W.Bro. E.B. O'Reilly was actually elected 
as the first archivist of the lodge. He was, in fact only 
invested with the collar, apron and jewel of his office in 
April, 1912 - the first such investiture in the history of 
the Grand Lodge of Canada. The archivist chest (we have a 
picture of it in our history) had been purchased in April, 
1911, so this gavel was probably one of the first items to 
be placed in the chest. Although the gavel was displayed 



15 



briefly with some of our other artifacts at the Grand Lodge 
Communication in 1980 , it has essentially remained in the 
chest for 72 years - not a very exciting existence! We are 
now more than happy to bring it here for an outing tonight 
to give it the publicity it so justly deserves. Thank you 
very much. 

Worshipful Master, The Heritage Lodge has a copy of 
The Barton History and I would like to present this copy to 
you personally on behalf of The Barton Lodge. 

NORFOLK LODGE NO. 10, SIMCOE 
John Hiley, W.M. 

Worshipful Sir, distinguished East and Brethren, the 
original design for the gavel is the one I now exhibit, so 
I am told although I have no documentation as proof. How- 
ever, I do have documentation of this gavel, which was made 
of wood from the locks at Sault Ste. Marie, and as you can 
see, it is exactly the same as the one you have seen earlier 

I only have proof of one gavel presented by W.Bro. 
Church on February 13, 1934, and I read from the minutes - 
"W.Bro. Church presented a gavel to Norfolk No. 10. This 
gavel was made from an oak table which at one time was owned 
by M. W.Bro. Wm. Mercer Wilson." I will leave this with your 
Secretary. 

KING HIRAM LODGE NO. 37, INGERSOL 
Robert Welt, W.M. 

Worshipful Sir and Brethren, I have in the minutes of 
our April meeting, 1934, a motion moved by R. W.Bro. McKay 
and seconded by Bro. S.W., that the presentation of a gavel 
to this Lodge made from furniture of our late M.W. Grand 
Master, Wm. Mercer Wilson, by R. W.Bro. Church of Simcoe 
at the regular meeting in March of St. John's Lodge No. 68, 
be incorporated in our minutes as of this date. Carried. 

We are presently unable to locate the gavel which we 
assume is the shape of those exhibited on the display table 
- since St. John's gavel is of the same shape and it was a 
joint presentation at their March meeting. I have however, 
brought two gavels with me which members of our lodge insist 
are Bro. Church gavels, although we cannot prove it. They 
are shaped, I am told, in the shape of a ship's beam since 
he at one time did woodwork on shipbulding. We have no 
proof other than the attestations of several elder brethren. 

ST. JOHN'S LODGE NO. 68, INGERSOL 
James Ranger, W.M. 

Worshipful Sir, R.W. Sirs and Brethren, as W.Bro. Bob 
Welt has said, our minutes are similar to those he has 
described. It was on March 16, that W.Bro. Joe Church 
attended our Lodge and presented two gavels, one to King 



- 16 



Hiram No. 37, and one to St. John's No. 68. I will leave 
copies of these minutes on the display table for later 
perusal by the brethren present. Fortunately the secretary 
at that time must have assumed he was the receipient of this 
gavel as he has had it in his home all these years. This 
was lucky for us as we have had two fires, one in 1872 and 
one in 1956 at which time this would have been destroyed. 
We owe our thanks to R.W.Bro. Fred Smith, the oldest R.W. 
Brother in Wilson District who has saved it for presentation 
tonight. 

BLENHEIM LODGE NO. 108, PRINCETON (meets in Innerkip) 
W.Bro. Max Riach, Secretary 

Worshipful Sir and Brethren, there is nothing in our 
minute book about this gavel and we have searched it from 
1900 to 1950. V. W.Bro. Harry White says he remembers the 
night that Bro. A.J. Pellow brought the gavel and said it 
was from a table in M. W.Bro. Wm. Mercer Wilson's home. 

WILSON LODGE NO. 113, WATERFORD 

Bro. Jim Barnett, J.W. 

Bro. Gerald E. Postell, J.S. and Historian 

Worshipful Sir, R.W. Sirs and Brethren, we consider 
ourselves very fortunate to have two of us here with four 
gavels. One is very similar to those you have already seen 
and three are made from walnut. At this time I would refer 
you to our historian for a brief history of these gavels. 

Worshipful Sir, as you may have noted already, Bro. 
Joseph Church must have been a very busy man in the month 
of March, 1934. I will read from our minutes of that month 
- "during this evening, Norfolk Lodge No. 10 put on a third 
degree in Wilson Lodge. Following the degree, W.Bro. Joseph 
Church of Norfolk Lodge No. 10 presented a gavel made from 
the furniture of the late M. W.Bro. Wm. Mercer Wilson, first 
Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Canada in Ontario and 
also gave a very interesting and comprehensive account of 
the history of masonry in Water f ord. " That verifies the 
one gavel. The other three gavels are not verified in the 
minutes. We do not have a copy of these minutes but they 
will be forthcoming W.S. 

ERIE LODGE NO. 149, PORT DOVER 
W.Bro. Charles Grant, P.M. 

Worshipful Master and Brethren, I had thought this 
particular gavel was unique but as I look around I now 
realize that Erie Lodge is not in possession of a "one-of-a- 
kind" rarity. I do know that it was made from a table owned 
by our Grand Master Wm. Mercer Wilson. Some members of 
Erie Lodge remember W.Bro. Mcintosh as an occasional visitor 
to Erie Lodge. Our minutes show that on February 18, 1929, 
W.Bro. Mcintosh gave a talk on the life and work of M. W.Bro. 
Wilson. This gavel could have been presented at that time. 



17 



The only record I have here is a program from our 100th 
anniversary in 1961. This states that we received a gift 
of a gavel from W.Bro. Mcintosh made from a walnut table. 
It further states that we received a gavel from W.Bro. Joseph 
Church made from an oak table from Bro. Mercer Wilson. It 
seems we must have another gavel somewhere and we will try 
to find it. 

WALSINGHAM LODGE NO. 174, PORT ROWAN 
W.Bro. William Godby, P.M. 

Worshipful Sir and Distinguished East, this photostat 
of our minutes is dated March 1, 1934, and reads in part 
- "W.Bro. Joseph Church of Norfolk Lodge No. 10, Simcoe, 
addressed the Lodge at this Juncture and spoke very fittingly 
of the first Grand Master, M. W.Bro. W.M. Wilson. He also 
spoke of W.Bro. W.A. Mcintosh as a brother with (sincere) 
interest in Craft matters and told us that W.Bro. Mcintosh 
had secured an oak dining table which had originally been 
the property of the first Grand Master, and his intention 
was to make twenty gavels from the wood in the table and 
present one to each of the 20 lodges in Wilson district. 
Unfortunately death had suddenly put an end to all his plans 
and W.Bro. Church had undertaken to finish his work and now 
presented one of the gavels to Walsingham Lodge." 

This gavel is a little different from the rest because 
the caretaker of the lodge used it as a hammer to pound a 
few nails he found sticking up. It does have a few marks on 
it. 

PLATSVILLE LODGE NO. 178, PLATTSVILLE 
W.Bro. Lloyd Hamilton, P.M. 

Worshipful Sir and Distinguished East, we have a gavel 
of which we have no record receiving but after seeing that 
it matches the other present I am certain it is authentic. 
I know that R. W.Bro. John Hofstetter has spent a great deal 
of time this winter trying to find out how we got it but I 
don't think he has been successful. 

SPRINGFIELD LODGE NO. 259, SPRINGFIELD 
Bro. Robert Hutton 

It gives me a great pleasure to present this gavel (iden- 
tical to the red oak gavel in the photograph) . It has two 
plaques on it- The one side reads - "made from a table from 
M. W.Bro. Mercer Wilson, first Grand Master" and on the other 
side - "presented by V. W.Bro. J.W. Church of Simcoe, May 11, 
1934." As has been pointed out by several previous speakers 
research is very difficult. Secretaries of that time put 
down what they thought was important. Our minutes of June 
24, 1936, records ' "it was moved by W.Bro. McKenney and 
seconded by Bro. Ken that Bro. Shively's report on the engrav- 
ing of S.W. Gavel, which was presented by Bro. Church of 
Simcoe, be accepted and Committee discharged. Carried." 



18 - 



This is all well and good but I cannot find any record of 
the committee ever having been formed. It is my pleasure to 
present this gavel for your perusal. 

OAK BRANCH LODGE NO. 2 61, INNERKIP 
W.Bro. Tom Semenick, P.M. 

Worshipful Master and Brethren, I have no copy to 
present but will read the brief section of minutes related 
to this gavel. - "It was presented by W.Bro. Church of 
Simcoe. This gavel was made from a table owned by M. W.Bro. 
Wm. Mercer Wilson." This gavel is of oak. We used it until 
about four years ago when we decided it was of unusual value. 
It was presented to the Worshipful Master of the time, 
W.Bro. W. E. Thompson. His son is a past master of our 
lodge and still an active member. Some of our members have 
claimed that the reason the gavels were presented was that 
Bro. Church was running for election to Districty Deputy. 
I don't know if there is truth in that or not but if so it 
apparently did not work. 

VITTORIA LODGE NO. 359, VITTORIA 
W.Bro. George Massey, P.M. 

Worshipful Sir and Distinguished East, in following up 
the request concerning the gavels, we found this gavel which 
seemed to fit the description in the photograph, being used 
in our working tools. No one had paid much attention to it. 
I took the task of researching the minutes and found in the 
minutes of February 23, 1934, the following - "W.Bro. J.W. 
Church presented the lodge with a beautiful case of flatware 
and also a gavel made from the furniture of the first Grand 
Master, M. W.Bro. Wm. Mercer Wilson." There is no inscription 
on the gavel so we have no proof but a further examination 
of the minutes shows that on March 30, 1934, a motion was 
made that the gavel to be sent to Woodstock for an inscrip- 
tion and the price was given. There was also a motion that 
W.Bro. J.W. Church be made an honourary member of Vittoria 
Lodge No. 359. This was done at a later meeting. There 
was a motion on May 25, 1934, that the decision on the 
inscription be delayed until the next regular meeting. At 
that meeting it was again laid over. In December, 1934, the 
secretary, W.Bro. Butler passed away so that may explain why 
the inscription was never made. The minutes of July 23, 
1937, record that the W.M. ordered the altar to be draped 
for one month in memory of our departed member W.Bro. J.W. 
Church. 

In going through the register to check the members still 
alive who were present when the gavel was presented, there 
were four: J. A. Thompson, then I. P.M. and uncle of V. W.Bro. 
Omar Thompson, our lodge Secretary who is present this 
evening; the Senior Deacon Bro. Nigle Bingleman who is alive 
and attends lodge; Bro. Wm. Johnson now 93 who attends with 
me at every meeting and is an honourary member; and Bro. Guy 
Teeple of Port Dover, a member of Erie Lodge No. 149, who is, 



19 



I believe 103 years old. This is all the information I could 
find and I think it verifies that this must be the gavel 
presented by W.Bro. Church. Regarding the earlier comment 
about W.Bro. Church. Regarding the earlier comment about 
W.Bro. Church running for District Deputy, I understand 
from senior brethren still alive, that it was his intention 
to run for this office and he was attending lodges throughout 
the district presenting these gavels. Perhaps this is why 
we have them. 

R. W.Bro. Joel Piper 

Once again I would like to express appreciation to the 
lodges that have participated and particularly to those 
beyond the district, Wilson No. 113 and The Barton No. 6. 
For the records of this lodge I must mention another gavel 
that does exist. It is inscribed and belongs to Oxford 
Lodge No. 76, Woodstock. I regret that they could not be 
represented here tonight. I feel that my share of the 
program is concluded but I would ask R. W.Bro. Jack Pos to 
offer remarks concerning the gavel mystery at this time. 

R. W.Bro. Jack Pos 

Worshipful Master, distinguished East and my Brethren. 
Thank you R. W.Bro. Piper. The saga of the Wilson Gavels 
started in earnest some 2 1/2 years ago after a personal 
interview with R. W.Bro. Bruce M. Pearce, the author of the 
book titled "First Grand Master - A Biography of William 
Mercer Wilson". On page 161 of the second edition published 
in 1973, Brother Pearce writes ... "Erie Lodge, Port Dover, 
and several other lodges have gavels made from wood taken 
from a table which belonged to him. They were gifts of the 
late* Rt. Wor. Bro. Dr. W.A. Mcintosh, Past Master of 
Norfolk Lodge No. 10 and Past Grand Superintendent R.A.M. 
for Wilson district, whose lamented death occurred suddenly 
in August, 1932. " 

It seemed like an interesting challenge to learn more 
about this intriguing bit of masonic history. The only 
reference we had was Erie Lodge in Port Dover, my father's 
lodge at the time of his death. I contacted W.Bro. Brian 
Varey, the lodge secretary, who is visiting with us this 
evening; and made an appointement to examine the noted gavel. 
Unfortunately, it could not be identified. We, therefore, 
gathered all the gavels together and photographed them 
individually and collectively. In the meantime a chance 
meeting with W.Bro. David Amis of The Barton Lodge No. 6 
in Hamilton revealed that their lodge had been presented with 
such a gavel. On comparing it with the photographs, it was 
determined that the red oak gavel was probably the mystery 
gavel. 

A search of the records indicated that there were 21 
lodges in Wilson district at the time. Accordingly a full 
size silhouette of The Barton gavel and the photograph of the 



- 20 



Erie gavel along with a covering letter was mailed to the 
21 Lodges in Wilson district. Encouraging responses were 
received from Oxford #76, King Hiram #78, St. John's #104, 
Walsingham #174, Thistle #250 and Oak Branch #261; these six 
along with Erie #14 9 and The Barton #6 brought our total to 
eight. At this point other activities in The Heritage Lodge 
were given a higher priority and the gavel project was 
tabled. However, as plans for the May meeting in 1983 came 
into focus, the gavel project was a top contender. Joel 
Piper's name came up as one who could provide the necessary 
leadership in providing the lodge with an interesting and 
viable project for the Regular Meeting in May. Not only 
did he uncover additional gavels namely: Norfolk #10, King 
Hiram #37, St. John's #68, Wilson #113, Platsville #178, 
Springfield # 259 and Vittoria #359, but in addition, and I 
am sure you will all agree, he has put together a very 
interesting program. However, the records should show yet 
another presentation. 

According to the minutes of a Regular Meeting of Vittoria 
Lodge No. 359, held on April 27, 1934, and on the occasion 
of the Official visit of the D.D.G.M. of Wilson district, 
Wor. Bro. J.W. Church made a presentation to Rt. Wor. Bro. 
D. J. Sinclair of a gavel made from furniture of the late 
Most Wor. Bro. Mercer Wilson ...". Perhaps after the Proceed- 
ings are circulated, we may eventually locate additional 
gavels of this unique design. 

Of course it is not uncommon to discover, after an 
extensive research into a particular topic, that you have 
uncovered more questions than answers. For this reason we 
are unable to close the book on this endeavour. Remember, 
according to the records of The Barton Lodge, W.Bro. Mcintosh 
presented a gavel to their Lodge on May 10, 1911, "made from 
wood which had been in the dining table of the first Grand 
Master". Then 25 years later, on November 11, 1936, W.Bro. 
Church also presented The Barton Lodge "... a gavel, the 
last of a great many made by his own hand, from an article 
of furniture taken from the home of M. W.Bro. William Mercer 
Wilson ...". According to W.Bro. Church, minutes of Walsing- 
ham Lodge, March 1, 1934, Dr. Mcintosh had secured an oak 
dining table, originally the property of the first grand 
master, but because of his untimely death in 1932, he was 
unable to carry out his plan of presenting each lodge in 
Wilson district with a gavel. As you will have noted from 
the reports of the lodges, W.Bro. Church was very busy in 
1934 carrying out the original plan of Dr. Mcintosh, that 
is, the presentation of red oak gavels. But what of the 
walnut gavels: The Barton #6, King Hiram #37, Wilson #113, 
and Erie #149? Was there another article of furniture made 
of walnut? Are the walnut gavels to be associated with 
Dr. Mcintosh during the 1911 period and the red oak gavels 
with W.Bro. Church and the 1934 period? According to the 
minutes of Vittoria Lodge dated July 23, 1937, "The Wor. 
Master ordered the altar to be draped for one month in 



21 



respect of our departed brother, Wor. Bro. Jas. Church" and 
one month earlier, on June 8, 1937, the 125th Anniversary 
of Norfolk Lodge, the list of officers includes Wor. Bro. 
J.W. Church, Chaplain. Yet the engraving on one side of the 
gavel as reported by Springfield Lodge indicates his rank 
as V.W.Bro. J.W. Church, did the engraver make an error? 
Which simply indicates that all research is not clearly 
defined and we must be exceedingly careful in arriving at 
conclusions. 

R.W.Bro. Piper 

R.W.Bro. Pos, members of The Heritage Lodge and Visitors; 
when this project was being coordinated for tonight's presen- 
tation, I used a vehicle on March 30 of this year to attempt 
to coordinate those having the gavels by requesting them to 
present themselves with the gavel at the Wilson District Past 
Masters and Wardens meeting. Photographs were taken of all 
the gavels. These slides are the results of that meeting 
and show the gavels suitably labeled with the name and 
number of the lodge. At this time I present them to R.W.Bro. 
Pos for safekeeping as the property of The Heritage Lodge. 

R.W.Bro. Pos 

On behalf of the lodge I thank you very much and I too 
have a parting comment and presentation. Last month I 
revisited Erie Lodge and with the good grace of my friend, 
W.Bro. Brian Varey, who is with us this evening, I was given 
permission to borrow their gavel in order that I might make 
an exact replica. The red oak was previously given to me by 
the late V.W.Bro. Randall Langs, one of the active founding 
members of our lodge. 

I would like at this time, to ask the Worshipful Master 
to meet me on the level to receive, on behalf of The Heritage 
Lodge this replica, in its hand carved holder, of the Wilson 
District Gavels in recognition of the assembly of those 
gavels at this Regular Meeting of The Heritage Lodge held on 
May 18, 1983. 

R.W.Bro. Ed Ralph 

I now call on our Lodge Chaplain, R.W.Bro. Arthur Watson 
to rededicate the historic gavels to "Freedom and Justice". 

CHAPLAIN 

R.W.Bro. Rev. A. Watson 

O Thou Great Architect of the Universe, thou hast given 
us the greatness of history and the edification of life. 
We give Thee thanks for the history bound up in these gavels 
and the lives they have influenced and the institutions they 
have kept in order. Grant that from this day they may 
continue to maintain order and that the glory they have 



22 - 



portrayed may continue to influence our order until time 
shall be no more. Amen. 

So Mote It Be 



HISTORICAL PRESENTATION 
by 



W.Bro. Edward M. Jaques 



Worshipful Master and Brethren; this history - "A 
Century of Masonry in Norfolk County/ 1804-1904", by John 
Fletcher Thompson, Classical Master, Simcoe High School, 
coincides with other writings describing the early settle- 
ments in Norfolk County, on the north shore of Lake Erie, 
but, because of its theme, this is unique. 

This is not intended as a biography, but only a brief 
summary of the author's Masonic activities during his five 
years in Simcoe, which culminated in writing this history. 
R. W.Bro. Edmond Ralph suggested that, if possible, mention 
be made of the author's background. 

John Fletcher Thompson, B.A. — joined the staff of 
Simcoe High School, at the beginning of the school term in 
September 1899, as Classical Master teaching languages 
including Latin and French. 

Two years earlier, at age 24, he had been made a Mason 
in Britannia Lodge No. 170, Seaforth, Ontario, and, on 
October 17, 1899, he attended Norfolk Lodge No. 10, Simcoe, 
Ontario, as a M.M. visitor. He lost no time in applying for 
membership by affiliation, and was soon a member of Norfolk 
Lodge and attending regularly. 

In 1901, his keen interest in Masonry was demonstrated 
by his motion - "that this lodge purchase a twelve dollar 
edition of M. W.Bro. J. Ross Robertson's "History of Free- 
masonry in Canada", and later to appropriate thirty dollars 
to purchase certain books to form the nucleus of a Masonic 
Library to be established in connection with Norfolk Lodge". 

Bro. Thompson's progress was so stimulated by his 
continued interest in all branches of Masonry, that, in 1904, 
the year this history was published, he held the offices — 
Junior Warden, Norfolk Lodge, No. 10, Simcoe, Ontario; Third 
Principal J., Ezra Chapter No. 23, R.A.M. , Simcoe, Ontario; 
Secretary-Treasurer Scottish Rite Association, in Norfolk 
County; and attained 18° A.&A. S. R. , Hamilton, Ontario. 

Continued confidence in Bro. Thompson was shown in the 
minutes of regular meeting September 1, 1903, when the W.M. 
appointed Bros. J.F. Thompson, J. Porter, and W.C. Everett, 



23 



a committee to "consider the centenary of Masonry in Norfolk 
County" . 

October 6, 19 03. The committee reported, recommending 
that — "The celebration of St. John the Evangelist's Day 
be combined with the celebration of the Centenary of Masonry 
at a convenient date in January, 1904; (in 1903, St. John 
the Evangelist's Day occurred on a Sunday). "The installa- 
tion of officers be held in the afternoon, and a banquet in 
the evening, to which certain Masonic speakers of reputation 
be invited, to include the Grant Master, and other elected 
officers of Grand Lodge; "The other lodges in Norfolk County 
be invited to participate in this celebration; That a com- 
mittee be appointed by the W.M. , to have full charge of the 
details of this celebration; Moved by Bro. J.F. Thompson, 
seconded by R.W.Bro. T.R. Atkinson, that the report of the 
committee on the Centenary be received and adopted. Adopted. 
The W.M. appointed the following committee in compliance 
with the above resolution — R.W.Bro. T.R. Atkinson, W. 
Bros. Frank Reid and R.E. Gunton, and Bros. J.F. Thompson, 
J. Porter, W.C. Everett, and H.P. Innes. 

The date chosen for this triple function was January 
22, 1904, giving the committee three and a half months to 
complete arrangements, and during that short time Bro. J.F. 
Thompson compiled this history, and included a complete 
story of the centenary celebration. 

Starting where Masonry in Norfolk County had its 
beginning — at Charlotteville, on the cliffs 150 feet 
above Lake Erie, and overlooking Turkey Point. In 1786 
white residents began settling in this area. In 1795, John 
Graves Simcoe, first Governor of Upper Canada, named Charlot- 
teville the prospective capital of "The Western Country" and 
in 1800, when the London district was first constituted, 
Charlotteville was chosen as the district town. 

Amongst the population were a few who were already 
members of the Ancient Order of Freemasonry, and these, 
"having made themselves known to each other", held a meeting 
at Job Lodor ' s Tavern, Charlotteville, on January 3, 1803. 
The meeting was for purposes of organization only, and the 
minutes record the resolution - "Resolved - that we will 
apply for a regular warrant to the Grand Lodge of Upper 
Canada". The second meeting was held December 27, i803. 
Regular meetings appear to have been held from January 1804, 
and finally getting their warrant September 27, 1804. 

Bro. Thompson tells of the frustrations in getting the 
warrant, but, apparently the lodge began to thrive after 
1804. Regular meetings were held, the membership increased 
until it spread over the greater portion of the district. 

He tells in detail of the outbreak of the war of 1812 - 
1814, the burning of Dover, pillagaing and burnings at Port 
Ryerse, Vittoria, and Waterford, and other parts of tne 
county. 



- 24 



He tells of another lodge being formed at Murphy's 
Tavern in 1812, two to three miles north of the present town 
of Waterford, now shown on some road maps as Dundurn. 

He tells of the Lodge at Charlotteville becoming known 
as Union Lodge No. 22; of the population growing and moving 
north and east; of Vittoria becoming the new capital of the 
London District of "Canada West" ; of Union Lodge moving to 
Vittoria and meeting in the Court House; of the Court House 
burning and most lodge records destroyed. Union Lodge No. 
22 did not open again, and most of the members went to the 
lodge north of Waterford now known as Lodge No. 26, and later 
as St. John's Lodge No. 14. After the Union Lodge at 
Vittoria burned, St. John's lodge was the only lodge meeting 
in Norfolk. 

He tells of St. John's Lodge moving to Simcoe in 1839 to 
quarters in the new Norfolk Hotel of William Mercer Wilson 
receiving the three degrees in the lodge room in the Norfolk 
Hotel; in 1854 the name was changed to Norfolk Lodge. 

He gives the history of each lodge formed in Norfolk 
County: 

Norfolk Lodge No. 10; Simcoe; 

Wilson Lodge No. 113, Waterford; instituted 1859; 
Erie Lodge No. 149, Port Dover; instituted 1861; 
Walsingham Lodge No. 174, Port Rowan; instituted 1865; 
Frederick Lodge No. 217, Delhi; instituted 1869; 
Victoria Lodge No. 359, Vittoria, instituted 1877; 
Defunct Langton Lodge No. 335, instituted 1876 to 1890. 

Besides the histories of the individual lodges, Bro. 
Thompson also relates our first Grand Master's efforts in 
forming our present Grand Lodge in the Province of Ontario, 
and that makes this history of particular interest to all 
Masons in this jurisdiction. 

This history is beautifully written in very understand- 
able language, although a few Latin phrases are thrown in 
— perhaps for interest. However, where these occur on 
this copy, an English translation is along the margin. 

We, in Norfolk County, are grateful to the author for 
providing us with such a comprehensive, and yet so concise, 
record. 

Worshipful Master, may I present to The Heritage Lodge 
this copy of Norfolk History? 

W.Bro. Ted Jacques initiated Erie Lodge No. 14 9, Port 
Dover, 1927; W.M. 1939. Exalted Regal Chapter No. 253, 
R.A.M., Port Dover; First Principal Z., 1938; Appointed 
Grand Sword Bearer 1973. Consecrated Odo de St. Amand 
Preceptory, 17; Knights Templar, Brantford, 1974. Admitted 
Murton Lodge of Perfection, A. & A. S. R. , Valley of 



25 - 



Hamilton, 1971. Hamilton Chapter Rose Croix, Hamilton, 1972; 
Moore Sovereign Consistory 32°, Hamilton, 1972. Installed 
Harington Conclave, Red Cross of Constantine No. 16, Ham- 
ilton, 1974. 



FREEMASONRY IN A GERMAN PRISONER-OF-WAR CAMP 

by 
R.W. Bro. John R. Dargavel 



To start with, what follows is in no way a speech, but 
a rambling cavalcade of masonic incidents that happened to 
me during the war. 

If, as we go along, you criticize me for the length of 
this talk, please don't forget - don't blame me - remember 
the war lasted six years! I was always in favour of a much 
shorter war. 

In June of 1940 - the fall of France - I was shipped 
to Iceland, a private in the Canadian army. I was stationed, 
there is a great word when talking about a private soldier - 
stationed - especially in Iceland. I was sleeping in a lava 
field twenty miles outside of their capital Rekavik. There 
I became friendly with a middle aged native. He was a 
Mason. The friendship developed and he was to take me to a 
lodge in Rekavik. I, as a private, depended on him for 
transportation. He was eagerly looking forward to me going 
to lodge with him - but about two days before the trip, 
the conversation cooled. He was not taking me to Lodge. I 
never did find out why. Two possible reasons - personally 
I think it was a combination of the two. 



Number one : 
in the war. 
station, etc. 
them. 



Iceland had been a neutral country - not involved 
Our regiment had landed - seized the radio 

We were resented. We had brought the war to 



Number two : We are not conscious of it here in North America 
but they are in Europe. We must belong, if we are going to 
visit. Belong to an acceptable Grand Lodge. An ordinary 
Mason in Iceland would not know how my Grand Lodge rated. 
He could have found out - but it was easier or simpler not 
to take me to Lodge. 

In the fall and early winter of 1940-41 - these were 
invasion days in England. What an experience to have had! 
What an experience to look back on! Our part of the Canadian 
Army was known as the travelling circus. We would spend 
our days driving around the South of England, sleeping in 
a different place ach night. The idea behind this was to 
keep the morale of the civilian population high by pretending 
that there were plenty of soldiers in England. The Masonic 



- 26 - 



reason for telling this was story was that - one night, our 
travelling company was billeted in the Masonic Hall in 
Kingston-on-Thames. We slept in the banquet hall on the 
floor, no mattress - two blankets, a haversack for a pillow. 
In those days that was just standard procedure - a way of 
life. Here in Ontario, I have seen Masons sleeping in 
Masonic banquet halls - but they were sitting upright in a 
chair! 

The night in Kingston-on-Thames, I was I believe, a 
corporal. I went to the Lodge meeting. I remember the 
expressions on the other soldier's faces when they saw me 
going into a Masonic Lodge. 

In September 1942, I was in a prison camp in Germany. 

One evening, the first month there, I was in a room, 
the same furniture, but more dismal and dirty, than the 
P.O.W. rooms that you see on T.V. That night, typical of 
me - I said as I was going out of the room "Happy to meet, 
sorry to part, happy to meet again". 

For once my big mouth had done me a favour. The next 
day, a new Zealand type came up to me, and had me prove 
myself as a Mason. Then he broke the news that there were 
two Masonic lodges operating in the camp. One Australian 
Lodge and one British. But the Lodges were all hush, hush 
- as by Hilter's creed - the Jews and the Free Masons were 
the two great evils in the world. Also some of our fellow 
prisoners - if they knew about the Masonic Lodge - could 
sell us out. Some of our escape operations were tripped off 
to the Germans. Nice atmosphere that we were living in. 

The Masons in the camp had a ritual book. It is known 
as the Emulation Ritual. The book had been taken from a 
dead British soldier in Crete by a fellow soldier and brought 
to the camp. The Germans had placed their censor stamp on 
the fly leaf. They had thought that the Little Book was a 
New Testament. 

Our Lodge met in the dentist's office. The dentist was 
a New Zealand Mason. The room was about the size of a small 
parlour. The Master's chair was the dentist's chair. 
Because of Hitler, the Tyler really was the Tyler! We 
always had guards snooping around. 

Oh yes, in the first month, the Germans had become wise 
to me. I was in handcuffs - which is a non-Masonic story. 
It ended up with about 5% of the prisoners in handcuffs. They 
were in the regular police handcuffs. They were put on at 
nine o'clock in the morning and taken off at nine o'clock 
at night. This nonsense went on for thirteen months. 

The greatest inconvenience to the handcuffs was that 
you couldn't change your clothing during the day. Have an 
overcoat on in the morning - and it stayed on all day. Also 



- 27 



there was the trouble with both wrists chained together, of 
reaching your braces and that back button. The only reason 
that I am mentioning this old history is because of its 
Masonic connection. I often think of this experience when I 
am giving my Masonic salutes - about the days when I was 
giving my Masonic salutes with handcuffs on. 

We had eighty-seven officers in the camp. I deliber- 
ately carried on a casual conversation with each of them. 
What service clubs, back in Canada, did they belong to and 
etc. and etc.? It ended up that I was the only Mason among 
the eighty-seven. Now, before you jump to a hasty conclusion 
- that is not as poor as it looks. The majority of these 
officers were young - unmarried and had never really become 
established in civilian life, when the war caught up with them, 

But one: I shall mention his name because in my mind he was 
not a phony. Lefty White came from Saskatchewan. His 
picture is in the documentary that CBC shows on the Dieppe 
Raid. Well - Lefty told me that he was a Mason. But, he 
couldn't even start to prove himself. Then I asked him what 
he was dressed like when he joined the Masons. Again he 
didn't have a clue. The interview with Lefty was embarras- 
sing. I still say that Lefty was not a phony. His name 
comes up again this evening. 

Now, before each of you sists in judgement of this man 
who couldn't come close to proving himself , let me tell you 
about myself and see if we cannot learn a lesson. 

I joined a branch of a Masonic fraternity some years ago. 
The ritual that was presented to me was a chaos. I remember 
them running outside to confer with the Tyler about the 
ritual. I never went back to that organization. Tonight 
I couldn't tell you a pass-word or how I was dressed for that 
ceremony. Let us not judge on Lefty White. My guess was 
that he joined our fraternity, but for some reason never 
became involved. Learn from this that the primary purpose 
in an initiation is to favourably impress the candidate so 
that he will come back to his lodge. 

Another problem faced me. We had only one ritual book 
between the two lodges. Therefore, I copied the ritual book, 
which I have here. On the front of the book is a title - 
"A Play". For nearly three years I carried this book in 
the inside pocket of my battle dress. Twice, in a search, 
our friends the Gestapo had me throw the contents of my 
pockets on the table. The second time, they were really 
interested, - wanted to know what the abbreviations were. 
I told them I didn't know. I just copied the play and the 
abbreviations were in it. 

Because of the crowded living conditions in the camp, 
there was no place to vocally practice the ritual. I 
remember when I was the Deacon in the Lodge - I would stand 
in the centre of a field in the snow - out of earshot of 



28 



anybody - beat a path in the snow just a little larger than 
the Mosaic pavement, stop at the Junior and Senior Warden's 
place and say my piece. 

Grenville Lodge was my Mother Lodge while all of this 
was happening. I wrote Father and said "I am seeing our 
friend Grenville in the South" - or - "I am now in a posi- 
tion to see my friend Grenville in the East". Meaning that 
at that time, I was Master. Therefore, the people here at 
home knew what we were doing. 

Also, in the fall of 1942, I had a letter from Mother, 
saying that my brother William's big night was that month; 
- meaning, though she couldn't say it - that William's 
installation as Master, was that month. 

As a matter of interest, we held Lodge meetings in the 
prison camp the same as here - nine months of the year, but 
suspended our activities in the summer months. 

In the last month of the war, when we were eagerly look- 
ing to the West for General Patton to come and release us - 
a notice went around the camp, asking all Masons to meet 
on a certain night - which we did - and signed a book - a 
photostat copy which is this. — The original book was 
given to the Grand Lodge of England. Our friend Lefty White 
was at that meeting and his signature was in that book. I 
still say that he wasn't a phony. 

There were prisoners at that final get-together who had 
been prisoners for the five years since Dunkirk - and they 
never had the good fortune to know that the Lodge was going 
on. 

What a great mental uplift or help that Lodge was to 
me - that I could keep active and study the ritual all of 
those years! 

But we didn't finish the war in that camp - we were 
marched across country to remain ahead of the American army. 
We were shot up once by the American Air Force.' After that, 
we marched each night. Finally we arrived at a camp that 
had 100,000 prisoners - and it was there that Patton liber- 
ated us. That is when our life became chaotic. Nobody was 
in charge or responsible. Anyway - to keep the story Masonic 
the barbed-wire was cut in various places and - if foolish 
enough, we could wander about the countryside. I went out 
and entered a small country church. In the vestibule of 
this church was a poster of President Roosevelt in his 
Masonic Regalia - and underneath was a caption. I can't 
read German - but it was something about the Jews and the 
Free Masons. 

When I arrived home, I still had my "Play" or Ritual 
Book in my inside pocket. My brother William was on the 
banquet circuit in Toronto District "C" (now 5 and 6) . 



29 



The very first day home, he confiscated the book and away 
he went on the banquet league of Toronto District "C". 

The uncertainty of life. William who was never in the 

army - died three months after I arrived home. I went out 

and obtained my Ritual Book from his effects - and here it 
is. 

One more Masonic story! I have told it privately, but 
I have never told it in public. And, out of respect for the 
Gentleman, I shall not tell his name in full. He is retired 
now but for many years was prominent in the Canadian Institute 
for the blind. 

I knew Fred as a soldier in England. All kinds of 
ability - an artist - also an outstanding centre fielder on 
a baseball team. Well, Fred went to Dieppe - got creased 
across the bridge of his nose by a bullet, took the bridge 
of his nose out. - Well, in the years immediately after the 
war - I came home one day and my Father was in his big chair 
and he said "We have an interesting case. A soldier from 
Dieppe was blinded and has an application in for the Masons. 
The Grand East has decided that if this applicant can tell 
the difference between daylight and darkness, we shall let 
him in". That was our Fred. The Grand East decided favour- 
ably. 

A year later, I was at a prisoner of war get-together 
in Mount Denis. He couldn't see the bottle of beer. He had 
to feel for it. Again, my big mouth. I leaned over and 
whispered to Fred, "Congratulations on joining the Masons". 
Fred showed a very pained expression on his face. He had 
been black balled by a local Lodge in Toronto. He was deeply 
hurt! If, at that time, I had been more experienced in 
Masonry, I would have advised him to bide his time, and then 
place his application in another Lodge. 

Your Heritage Lodge is to be congratulated for the work 
that you are doing. My only amazement is - why didn't some- 
body do it before? 

Moving the original Masonic Temple from Woodbridge to 
Black Creek Village - Wonderful! 

Your Lodge and its philosophy is telling us to keep the 
sacred obligations which have descended upon each of us - let 
them sink deeply intd our hearts. Those who established our 
individual Lodges have passed into the history books. Their 
great trust is now in our hands. 

I have heard - it was my family folk-lore of Free 
Masonry in Eastern Ontario - the years 1860-1900: My Great 
Grandfather was Master of Simpson Lodge. They were simple 
farmers or merchants - their academic education at the best 
was the three "R's". Their lodge took place on a certain 
day before the full moon - the easy driving - I have heard 



- 30 - 



how they repeated their Masonic Ritual as they drove along 
in their horse and buggy or how they became letter perfect 
while practicing on the banks of the Rideau Canal. However, 
of more importance - how they were continually striving not 
to get more men into Masonry - but more Masonry into men ! 
They did not realize it but their simple way of living was 
to exalt and ennoble humanity. To bring life out of dark- 
ness and beauty out of roughness. To make every hard won 
inheritance more secure, every sanctity more sacred and every 
hope more radiant! 

So it was throughout all of rural Ontario at that time. 
The pioneers, as Masons, sought to have the teachings of 
the Masonic Lodge become the silent partner of the home, 
the school and the church. 

That is why I am so proud of Heritage Lodge. You have 
reminded us of our Masonic Legacy. Their great trust is now 
in your hands. 

The greatest tribute that we can pay to our Masonic 
ancestors is to try to absorb from their example some of 
their dedicated purpose, some of their selflessness and 
sacrificial service. 

To resolve that part of the superstructure of the Masonic 
order which may be our responsibility to build - shall be 
worthy of the foundation already laid. 

R.W.Bro. John R. Dargavel 

A native of Toronto, graduated from University of 
Toronto and enlisted in Canadian Army, September, 1939; 
discharged June, 1945. Taught school in Toronto from 1946 
to 1972. Initiated, Grenville Lodge No. 629, Toronto, 1930; 
W.M. 1960. Grand Junior Warden, 1963. Presently Historian 
of Grenville Lodge. Member of St. Clair Chapter R.A.M. , 
Toronto, and A. & A.S.R., Valley of Toronto 32 degree. 



RE-BIRTH OF FREEMASONRY IN CONTINENTAL EUROPE 

by 
W.Bro. Arthur Andrew 



It is an honour for me to have the opportunity to speak 
to you this evening. When I was first asked to speak to you, 
I found myself at a loss in where to start and when to stop 
on the subject that you have asked me to speak. I realize, 
however, that the Brethren here tonight represent a cross 
section of Masonry from various Masonic Bodies. Therefore, 
I assume that you would be interested not only in Free- 
Masonry in France, but on the continent of Europe and the 
British Isles. The subject I shall endeavour to deal with 



- 31 



tonight is so extensive that it would take several evenings 
to exhaust it. 

I shall therefore, confine myself to the broad outlines, 
rather than detailed history. 

Masonry on the continent of Europe started a long time 
ago and it is generally admitted that the Mother Grand Lodge 
of the World is the United Grand Lodge of England. England 
has been and still is the Custodian of the Ancient Land- 
marks which are generally followed by all regular Lodges. 
At the opposite side of the Bulwark of Masonry in Europe, 
we must admit that in some countries Masonry is completely 
forbidden. In fact, not even tolerated, and I shall name 
Spain and the countries behind the Iron Curtain, and so my 
Brethren, Masonry as we know and recognize it today had its 
humble beginning in London, England in the year 1717. Over 
the years, many notable men have been initiated into Masonry. 
It would be only fitting to mention one of the greatest of 
our time, "Sir Winston Churchill" who was initiated in 
Studholm Lodge No. 1591, at the Cafe Royal, Regent St., 
London, on May 24th, 1909. Today in the great city of 
London, on Great Queen, stands one of the finest symbols 
of Freemasonry, "The Grand Temple", known as the Freemasony 
Hall which covers an area of over two acres. The Temple is 
120 feet in length and 90 feet wide, and is 62 feet in height 
This Temple was built in the late 1920 's as the Masonic 
Peace Memorial, and dedicated to the Brethren who fell in 
the first world war. There are 17 Lodge rooms of various 
sizes to accommodate 50 to 500 at one time. These rooms 
together with the Grand Temple can accommodate some 4,000 
Brethren. Before leaving the Grand Temple in London, one 
should mention the excellent Museum, of course the highlight 
to me was the showcase containing the Records of some 4 
Brethren proven to be Masons, held Regular meetings in Stalag 
No. 3 Concentration Camp during the last World War. While 
in London, I had the pleasure of a conducted tour of the 
Temple. I also attended Lodge at the Temple in London during 
this time and later at Grays, Essex. 

The Grand Lodge of Scotland deserves a special mention. 
It came into existance in 1736 and like London, it has a. 
Grand Temple on a smaller scale on Great George St., which 
is a very fitting name and location as the late King George 
VI was installed in the Temple in 193 6. One difference 
exists, the WM has the title of RW and the Wardens the title 
of W.Bro. 

Proceeding on the continent of Europe, the Grant Orient 
of Belgium was established in 18 33 and has continued in 
existence to the present time. However, many of its members 
do not believe in the existence of a Supreme Being and are 
opposed to the display of the Volume of the Sacred Law in 
Lodge Rooms because of a mistaken belief that such a belief 
and display indicates support of the Roman Catholic Church. 



- 32 



Therefore, the Grand Orient of Belgium is not recognized 
except by a few Grand Lodges. However, a Grand Lodge of 
Belgium, grouping 11 Lodges working regularly and display- 
ing the 3 Great Lights, was recently consecrated by the 
Grand Master of the Netherlands and it is already recognized 
by several North American Obediences. Moreover, a number 
of Belgium Masons formed a Lodge on the French Border, I 
had the priviledge of attending the Consecration and Instal- 
lation of Officers, presided over by the Grand Master, of 
the Grand Lodge National Francaise. 

Moving across the border to Holland, the Dutch take 
their Masonry activities very seriously. They have several 
small Lodges with a membership of some 6,500. They meet 
every week and devote many of these meetings to masonic 
research and instructing EA's and FC's, normally it will take 
one year between each degree. The Lodge work is of course, 
conducted in the Dutch language, however, about 90% of the 
Brethren speak good English. 

Let me now leave Central Europe for a few words about 
Italy. Masonry was reinstituted in Italy in 1733 and was 
after many years of activity, suppressed by Mussolini in 
1927. It was only in 1945 after Italy was liberated by our 
Armed Forces that Masonry was revived. The two former Grand 
Lodges joined forces under the Grand Orient of Italy. 
Another Grand Lodge, the Grand National Lodge was formed in 
1948. The latest report indicates that there is a movement 
toward unity of Freemasonry in Italy. 

Greece is a poor country with rather limited resources 
and the Freemasons of that country are struggling against 
tremendous odds, striving to keep the light of Masonry 
burning in an area that could well apply its principles to 
improve the conditions of the common people. 

There is an interesting tale about Masonry in Turkey. 
There the candidate must qualify in each degree before he can 
advance, then he must apply for the next two degrees. An 
unusual sidelight, the password is changed every three 
months, therefore, members must attend Lodge frequently so as 
to readily gain admission. 

In Israel, there is a wonderful spirit of Fellowship 
between Christians, Jews and Moslems featured by Masonic 
Principles. In 1948 the National Grand Lodge of Palestine 
was changed to the Grand Lodge of Israel. The two former 
groups buried their differences to form this body. They 
have been very successful bearing in mind the many differences 
of religious background. I have not had the opportunity to 
attend a Lodge Meeting in this area; however, several 
Brethren who I know have attended Galilee Lodge where they 
broke the bread of the fraternity in the true spirit of 
the Brotherhood of Man and the Fatherhood of God. 



- 33 



Switzerland deserves special mention, as for the past 
century, she has observed a strict neutral state in all 
Masonic activities. The Grand Alpine of Switzerland was 
created in 1844, however, it was not until 1931 that the 
volume of the Sacred Law was placed on the Alter at all 
meetings. In December 1963, Grand Lodge National Francaise 
formally recognized the Grand Alpine of Switzerland. 
I had the pleasure of attending this meeting in Paris where 
the French National Grand Lodge made this decision. 

Sweden never has a living past Grand Master of the Grand 
Lodge, as the King of Sweden becomes the Grand Master and 
holds that position for life. Now to quote the Grand Master 
of the French National Grand Lodge in Paris, on His recent 
visit to Norway, Sweden and Denmark, "If I were given the 
opportunity of choosing a picture giving the best illustra- 
tion of the beauty and purity of Freemasonry, I could not 
better than recall the visit to these countries and an 
evening spent with the Brethren". 

Another country deserves special mention for the 
purpose of Freemasonry. The original Grand Lodge of Germany 
was formed in 1723, however, Masonry has suffered for many 
years in that country and it is still split into two Grand 
Lodges. Prior to the ban of Masonry by Hitler in 1933, 
there were 9 Grand Lodges in Germany, after the end of the 
last war there still remains some 15,000 Members out of the 
original 70,000, 10,000 Members are in West Germany and 5,000 
in East Germany where Masonry is forbidden. The four remain- 
ing Grand Lodges which had their Lodges in West Germany 
transferred their Lodges in 1949 to the United Grand Lodge 
of West Germany. It took another 10 years to achieve complete 
unity of Masonry in West Germany. A special note of interest 
-- the 4th Convention since 1949 was held in West Berlin 
in September 1961, four weeks after that fateful day, the 
13th of August when the Wall was erected to divide the City 
of Berlin. Many Brethren used their leisure time to look 
at the Wall for the first time, however, in spite of these 
troubled times, over 230 worthy Masons were present at the 
Convention. Three Canadian Military Lodges exist in West 
Germany; a Canadian Army Lodge at Soest, which was conse- 
crated in 1962, two RCAF Lodges, Dominion 848 located at. 
Baden-Baden and the Lodge of Two Bridge 877, located at 
Zweibrucken. There are also several American Lodges, the 
most noted is George Washington Lodge 820 at Kaiserslaution 
which was consecrated in 1955. I have visited several of 
the above Lodges. 

The history of Freemasonry in France is extremely mixed 
up. It dates back to 1721. However, any attempt to follow 
its several strands would involve a mass of detail far 
beyond my scope of allotted time. To simplify things, I will 
say that there are three Masonic bodies in that country; the 
Grand Orient, Grand Lodge of France and the Grand Lodge 
National Francaise (Regular) . The Grand Orient started its 
existence in 1777; however, in the year of 1876 it denounced 



34 



the official reference to the existence of God, as many of 
the Members are Atheists. Lodges under the Grand Orient 
discuss subjects far remote from Masonry and they take an 
active part in political discussion at Lodge meetings. 
They have the largest body of some 20,000. Next we have the 
Grand Lodge of France with about 9,000 and was formed earlier 
than the Grand Orient, however, it ceased to exist in 1777 
and in fact, it gave birth to the Grand Orient. The Grand 
Lodge of France was revived in 1894 and worked in the name 
of and under the Supreme Socttish rite in France. The Grand 
Lodge of France was declared a self-governing body in 1904. 
While this Grand Lodge claims many of the ancient landmarks, 
it cannot be considered regular for two reasons; first of 
all inter-visitation with Lodges of the Grand Orient is 
openly permitted; secondly, many Members deny a belief in 
God, however, in order to retain many Members, the Grand 
Lodge of France considers the Great Architect of the Universe 
as a Vague Guiding Principle and the Holy Bible as an 
undefined Symbol. 

The Third Obedience, grouping some 7,000 Members under 
85 Lodges is the Grand Lodge National Francaise (French 
National Grand Lodge) which came into being in 1913. This 
Grand Lodge was formed from two Lodges under the Grand Orient 
which became increasingly dissatisfied with the negative 
attitude of the Grand Orient toward the belief in God and 
the display of the volume of the Sacred Law and its positive 
political activities. The G.L.N.F. celebrated its 50th 
Anniversary in December 1963, and many of the Masons who 
had made their Masonic home under this Grand Body during 
the past 50 years were present. 

It is interesting to note that near Paris during World 
War I, in an open field under special dispensation from Grand 
Lodge of England and assisted by Grand Lodge Officers from 
G.L.N.F., Paris, they initiated into Freemasonry a young 
American Army Captain, later destined to become a five star 
General and President of the United States, - General Dwight 
D. Eisenhower. World War II destroyed nearly all that had 
been so carefully built up in the years between the wars. 
In 1940 the Vichy Government issued a decree which forbade 
the practice of Freemasonry during the German occupation and 
most of the Lodge properties and records were destroyed. 
However, there are many interesting tales in Paris, one being 
that the Master of St. George Lodge buried the Charter in a 
wine garden which was recovered in tact after the war. 
Masonry did not flourish due to political and religious 
activities, however, with the advent of the Nato Alliance 
and establishment of many English and French Lodges in Paris 
and surrounding area, Masonry took a new lease on life. 

My personal experience with Masonry in Europe was as 
a member of the armed forces from 1958 to 1964 when I was 
stationed at Metz in France. At that time and to the best 
of my knowledge there were 6 Canadian lodges, three in 
France and three in West Germany. There were numerous 
American lodges as well. All were under the obedience of 
the Grand Lodge Nationale Francais, the only recognized 
masonic body. 



35 



During my tour there it became apparent that General 
DeGaulle was planning to drop out of N.A.T.O. and the armed 
forces lodges would then go into darkness. Eighteen of us 
therefore, received permission from the Grand Master to form 
a masonic lodge which would permit the admission of national 
Frenchmen. Many of those that joined had previously been 
members of masonic bodies but due to Hitler's decrees against 
masonry had gone into darkness. Some that kept the light 
of masonry burning continued to practice in secret and wore 
a small forget-me-not on their lapel. 

We did form Lorraine Lodge No. 76, which is still in 
operation. Meetings were held in a hen house. I was Tyler 
and although the weather is not as cold there as it gets in 
Canada, there was no heat in the building and heavy clothing 
was required to keep warm. I became the third master of 
Lorraine Lodge. 

We later purchased a bus garage and commenced renova- 
tions, installing the plumbing ourselves. I was transferred 
back to Canada before the work was completed. However, I 
have since returned and was delighted to see the transfor- 
mation. There are now two lodge rooms, one about the size 
of the Preston-Hespeler lodge room and a smaller room plus 
anterooms and washrooms. The work follows the Emulation 
Ritual of the Grand Lodge of England, but is conducted in 
French. 

After this brief summary of Masonry in France, you will 
surely wonder what are the prospects of reaching unity in 
France. At first sight there is little chance of the Grand 
Orient taking steps towards a return to regular Masonry. 
What about the Grand Lodge of France? For some time, there 
has been a movement in favour of a union of the Grand Lodge 
of France and the G.L.N.F.; however, it was made clearn during 
the past few years that the Grand Lodge of France is not yet 
ready to accept the basic landmarks and will not sever its 
relations with the Grand Orient. However, during the past 
five years, five (5) Lodges in their entirety have been 
reconstituted from the Grand Lodge of France to the G.L.N.F. 
and they are now working under the jurisdiction of that body. 
The Grand Lodge National Francaise is the only completely 
regular Masonic Body in France. 

The G.L.N.F. today and for the past 50 years is beyond 
a doubt, adhering to the ancient landmarks. It is recognized 
by all the Grand Lodges in Canada and U.S.A. and over 30 
Grand Lodges around the world. It is worth noting that over 
2,500 Members of the G.L.N.F. are Brethren belonging to the 
U.S. and Canadian Military Forces spread over 15 Lodges. 
One of these Lodges is comprised of American Brethren 
stationed in Spain and who meet monthly across the French 
Border. The G.L.N.F. is divided into five Provincial Grand 
Lodges, with each Lodge comprised of" about 1,500 Members 
comparable to the Grand Lodge of P.E.I. It was in one of 
these Provincial Grand Lodges that I served. 



36 - 



W.M. - thank you so much for being permitted to pass 
along a small bit of information about the Lodges, - some 
of which I was privileged to serve. 

W.Bro. Arthur Andrew 

Raised in Hiram & Lebanon Lodge #3, Summer side P.E. 
Island, (January 1948); Worshipful Master, Lorraine Lodge 
#74, Metz, France (1962); Provincial Grand Chaplain, Province 
of Austrasia, Metz, France (1963); Life member, Lorraine 
Lodge, Metz, France (1964); Affiliated Guelph Lodge #258, 
Guelph, Ontario (1971). 

Exalted St. Lambert Royal Arch Chapter #21, St. Lambert, 
Quebec (1967); First Principal, Guelph Chapter #40, Guelph, 
Ontario (1979). 

Consecrated Victoria Preceptory, Guelph, Ontario (#10) 
(1976) ; Presiding Preceptor, Victoria Preceptory (#10) (1979) 

Honoured as a Royal and Select Master of Ontario in 
Conestoga Council #17, Waterloo, Ontario (1978); Greeted as 
a Super Excellent Master in Adoniram Council #2, Toronto, 
Ontario (1978); Welcomed into Sir William York Rite College 
#57, Hamilton, Ontario (1980). 

Admitted to Lodge of Perfection, Guelph, Ontario (1974); 
Chapter Rose Croix, Guelph, Ontario (1975) ; Moore Consistory, 
Hamilton, Ontario (1975). 

Member Rameses Shrine Temple, Toronto, Ontario (1980) ; 
Member Guelph District Shrine Club, Guelph, Ontario (1980) . 

Installed Conestoga Conclave #12, Red Cross of Constan- 
tine, Waterloo, Ontario (1981) . 



MESSAGE FROM THE WORSHIPFUL MASTER 

The year is passing quickly. As we enter the summer 
recess only one regular meeting remains prior to Installation 
in November. Perhaps a few thoughts are timely. 

In September the lodge is to be honoured by a visit 
from the Master of the Quatuor Coronati #207 6, our own R.W. 
Bro. Wallace E. McLeod. As he possesses rare and special 
skills I have prevailed on him to modify his presentation to 
better suit the current needs of the lodge. His address 
will become both an informative research presentation and a 
teaching session. As we learn how to research, prepare and 
present a paper suited to the goals of this lodge, R.W. Bro. 
McLeod will inform us on a timely topic of his choice. We 
hope that some of those present will be inspired to follow 
his lead and begin work to prepare a paper that may in due 
time also be presented before this lodge. 



37 - 



I cannot be more enthusiastic about project H.O.M.E. 
which has done wonderfully well and is proceeding on schedule, 
I express the appreciation of The Heritage Lodge to both 
members and non-members alike for their support of it. 
Under R.W.Bro. Ed Drew, the fund-raising task force has done 
a splendid job with their treasurer, W.Bro. James Major 
reporting receipts of about $93,000 as of June 15. All 
that remains is a final push to complete our goal of $100,000 
before Grand Lodge convenes in July. 

We hope to see a large turnout of members for the 
cornerstone ceremony on October 1st. The lodgeroom will be 
dedicated at some later date not yet announced by the Grand 
Master. At present, the Expediting Committee under W.Bro. 
Alan Hogg is concentrating on the erection of the building 
and on the interior design and furnishing of the lodgeroom. 
Please continue to support their search for suitable period 
furnishings. 

In maintaining the lifeline of the lodge, R.W.Bro. 
Frank Bruce has this year presented an interesting and 
productive lodge program and I am delighted with the support 
it has received. Please continue to assist him by passing 
program suggestions to him. 

Although our Senior Steward would prefer that I pass 
the credit elsewhere perhaps a comment on our lodge refresh- 
ments is in order. R.W.Bro. Ralph has worked hard this year 
to provide something a little different and more extensive 
and it is important that we receive your comments on what 
is being done. I do apologize for the necessity of a small 
charge for food but I know you recognize that our low dues 
simply cannot support this expense. If you approve what has 
been done, let us know about it and in particular, express 
your appreciation to R.W.Bro. Ralph. If you feel otherwise, 
please communicate your criticism to me. 

Elections are upon us and new officers may be needed. 
The Wardens and I would be pleased to hear from any Past 
Master willing to serve. 

I hope these lines may help you to feel better-informed 
about current lodge activities. Please enjoy a relaxing 
summer. 



R.W.Bro. Balfour LeGresley 
Worshipful Master. 



- 38 - 

COMING EVENTS 

AUGUST 31, 1983i (Wednesday), General Purpose Committee 
Meeting of The Heritage Lodge will be held in the Preston- 
Hespeler Masonic Temple at 7: 30 p.m. This will be the 
commencement of another Masonic year and all Committee 
Chairmen, as well as members of the G.P. Committee are 
urgently requested to be in attendance. 

SEPTEMBER 21, 1983, (Wednesday), Twenty-Eighth Regular 
Meeting of The Heritage Lodge will be held in the Preston- 
Hespeler Masonic Temple at 7:30 p.m. On this occasion we 
will have the unique priviledge of receiving the Worshipful 
Master of Quatuor Coronati Lodge No. 2076, London, England, 
our own R.W.Bro. Wallace E. McLeod, who has been persuaded 
to modify his talk to emphasize the methodology of invest- 
igating, preparing and presenting a masonic research paper. 
For more details see 'Message From The Worshipful Master 1 , 
page 36 of these Proceedings. This is also our annual 
Election of Officers. 

OCTOBER 1, 1983, (Saturday), at 1:00 p.m., the Cornerstone 
Laying Ceremony, at the site of the proposed restoration of 
the Masonic Lodge Room in Black Creek Pioneer Village, 5 
Shoreham Drive, Downsview, Ontario. Anyone who has made a 
donation to the H.O.M.E. Project should have received a 
complimentary admission (including a guest) to the Black 
Creek Pioneer Village. If you have not received your special 
pass, or have not contributed to the H.O.M.E. Project, see 
your District Representative. The names of all Representatives 
are given on pages 48-50, Lodge Proceedings, Vol.6, No.l, 
Sept., 1982. 

NOVEMBER 16, 1983, (Wednesday), Twenty-Ninth Regular Meet- 
ing of The Heritage Lodge will be held in the Preston- 
Hespeler Masonic Temple, Cambridge, at 7*3° p.m. Installation 
of the Worshipful Master and Investiture of the Lodge Officers 
This is also the occasion of the Official Visit of the D.D.G. 
M. of Waterloo District. 

FROM THE SECRETARY'S DESK 

All members are reminded that their Annual Dues are 
payable at any time. Your Fees for 1983-1984 are due Sept., 
1st, 1983. This may also be your last opportunity to obtain 
a Life Membership at the low cost of $175-00 plus the current 
dues of $15.00; at the Annual Communication of Grand Lodge, 
a proposed motion if passed, will increase the cost of 
commuting a Life Membership from $25.00 to $30.00. Also from 
these Proceedings you will note that, subject to Grand Lodge 
approval of our amended By-Laws, there will be an increase 
in the cost of Life Memberships. 

MAILING LIST CORRECTIONS 

The following corrections should be made to your 
mailing list: 



39 - 



30. W.B. Bolton 

#1202, 1285 Cahill Dr., 
Ottawa, K1V 9A7 

64. George A. Campbell 
P.O. Box 37^, 
St. Catharines, 

74. Robert J. Clark 

Apt. 22 - 587 Cranbrook Rd 
London. N6K 2Y4 



111. J.H 



160 



PM 



Eagle son 

151. Robert F. Gordon 

Suite 906 - 180 Lees Ave., 
Ottawa, K1S 5J6 

Charles R. Griffiths 
1549 Dougall Ave. , 
Windsor, N8X 1S2 



195. Reginald E. Jewell 
170 Dundas St.W. 
Trenton, K8V 3R1 

228. George A. Marr 

Algoma Lodge No. 469 

236. George Y. Masters PDDGM 
Sault St. Marie, P6A 6k4 

'257. Cecil S. McKnight 
318-156 Fitch St. , 
Welland, L3C 5R7 

361. F. Roy Weatherdon 

Port Elgin, NOH 2C0 

316. Jack Shipp 

Guelph, N1E 3L5 

373. Edwin Wilson 

Georgetown, L7G 2Y5 



NEW ADDRESSES 

460. Robert C. Casselman PDDGM 
11 Hughes Rd. , 

Orillia, L3V 2L9 
Excelior Lodge #142 
Eastern (477) 

461. Jack Moore DDGM 

9 Knighton Dr. , 
Toronto, M4A 1V9 
Stevenson #218 
Toronto 3 (478) 

462. John Richard Castle PM 
27 Meadowglade Cr. , 
Willowdale, M2J 1C6 
Sunnyside #582 
Toronto 2 (479) 

463. Harold F. Whitmore GS 
43 Skyland Dr. , 
Hamilton, L9A 3B9 (^80) 
Hamilton C, Temple #324' 

464. Garry E. Bulmer PM 
243 Graham Ave . S . , 
Hamilton, L8K 2M7 
Dufferin #291 
Hamilton C (481) 

465. George Ansley Heels WM 
29 Doverwood Crt., 
Willowdale, M2M 2G6 
Simcoe #644 

Toronto 7 (482) 

466. Kenneth A. Hunter PM 

10 Conlins Rd. , 

West Hill Ont. , MIC 1C3 

Sunnyside #582 

Toronto 2 (483) 



467. John M. Robinson PM 
9 Sandhill Dr. , 
Rexdale, M9V 1H6 
Delta #634 

Toronto 6 (484) 

468. Alan C. Snider PM 
35 0'Meara Crt. , 
Willowdale, M2J 4Y9 
Mount Sinai #522 
Toronto 2 (485) 

469. Brian J. Moorse MM 
122 Iroquois Ave. , 
Oshawa, L1G 3X3 
Parkwood #695 
Ontario (486) 

470. Sam Sniderman PM 
208 Torresdale Ave., 
Willowdale, M2R 3E6 
Mount Sinai #522 
Toronto 2 (487) 

471. Samuel J. Wilson PM 
220 Spruce St. Box 146, 
Massey, POP 1P0 
Espanola #527 
Sudbury-Manitoulin (488) 

472. Howard J. Alpert MM 
15 Riderwood Dr., 
Willowdale, M2L 2X4 
Mount Sinai #522 
Toronto 2 (489) 

473. Warren R. Covent MM 
79 Gretman Cresc. , 
Thornhill, L3T 5L9 
Mount Sinai #522 
Toronto 2 (490) 



4o 



474. Robert French MM 
3661 The Credit Woodlands 
Mississauga, L5C 2L1 
Islington #715 
Toronto 2 (491) 

475- John E.H. Rognvaldson MM 
Apt. 116-4 Pine Rd. , 
Elliot Lake, P5A 2L1 
Elliot Lake #698 
Algoma East (492) 



476. Donald M. Smith MM 

Box 395 - 672 Ann St. , 
Prescott, KOE 1T0 
Central #110 
St. Lawrence (493) 



GRAND LODGE OFFICERS (1982 - 1983) 

THE MOST WORSHIPFUL THE GRAND MASTER 

M.W.Bro. Howard 0. Polk 

892 Aaron Ave., Ottawa, K2A 3P3 

THE DEPUTY GRAND MASTER 
R.W.Bro. Ronald E. Groshaw 
31 Princess Margaret Blvd., Islington, M9A 1Z5 

THE GRAND SECRETARY 

M.W.Bro. Robt. E. Davies 

Drawer 217, Hamilton, L8N 3C9 

DISTRICT DEPUTY GRAND MASTER, WATERLOO DISTRICT 
R.W.Bro. Rev. W. Gray Rivers 
8 Kirby Ave., Dundas, L9H 5K9 



LODGE OFFICERS (1982 - 1983) 



Worshipful Master, . . . 
Immediate Past Master, 
Senior Warden, . . 
Junior Warden, . . 

Chaplain, 

Treasurer, 

Secretary, 

Assistant Secretary 
Senior Deacon, . . 
Junior Deacon, . . 
Director Ceremonies 
Inner Guard, .... 

Tyler 

Senior Steward, . 
Junior Steward, . 

Organist, 

Historian, 

Archivist, 

Editor, 



.W.Bro. Balfour LeGresley 
W.Bro. George E. Zwicker 
.W.Bro. David C. Bradley 
.W.Bro. C. Edwin Drew 
.W.Bro. Arthur Watson 
.W.Bro. Gary J. Powell 
.W.Bro. Jacob (Jack) Pos 
W.Bro. George Moore 
.W.Bro. Robert S. Throop 
W.Bro. Albert Barker 
.W.Bro. Aage Bjerknes 
.W.Bro. Edsel C. Steen 
.W.Bro. Wilfred Greenhough 
.W.Bro. Edmond V. Ralph 
W.Bro. Donald B. Kaufman 
.W.Bro. Len Hertel 
W.Bro. Allan J. Cohoe 
W.Bro. Glen T. Jones 
.W.Bro. Jack Pos